Past Events @ C4E

  • Thu, Nov 29, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Arlie Loughnan

    Self, Others and the State: Relations of Criminal Responsibility

    The paper aims to make the case for a fresh examination of the topic of criminal responsibility. An assessment of the criminal law literature reveals that criminal responsibility is regarded as significant in three main ways: (1) as the normative heart of the criminal law; (2) as serving the coordination and legitimation needs of the criminal law; and (3) as a platform for the development of the modern criminal law. These three accounts of the significance of criminal responsibility correspond to the work of a group of scholars, or, in the case of (2) and (3), single scholars – Nicola Lacey and Lindsay Farmer – who have developed sui generis analyses. This is not all there is to the significance of criminal responsibility, however. I suggest that criminal responsibility is significant because it encodes keys sets of relations – between self, others and the state – as relations of responsibility. My account of criminal responsibility as encoding relations of responsibility assists in identifying the significance of criminal responsibility outside the criminal law. As I discuss in this chapter, on my account, the significance of criminal responsibility arises from the dynamic inter-relation between criminal responsibility and social ideas about responsibility, according to which considerations of power, subjectivity and relationality make themselves felt in the criminal law in particular ways.

    ☛ please register here

    Arlie Loughnan
    University of Sydney
    Law

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Nov 28, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: John Enman-Beech

    Contract as an Ethical Frame for Employment, Tenancy, and Consumption

    What happens when we think employment, tenancy, and consumption (ETC) through the ethical frame of contract? This frame sees ETC as a collection of individual deals that assign obligations to the deals’ parties. The ETC system is justified if the individual deals are justified, and a deal is justified if it is the product of voluntary and informed agreement. But deals are rarely if ever fully voluntary and informed in ETC. This calls the contractual frame into question, but it continues to be used everywhere, from legal doctrine to economic analysis to political rhetoric to individuals’ conceptions of their relationships to their cell providers. My hypothesis: contract perversely conscripts people into choosing and re-choosing the existing social order, entrenching patterns of preferences and entitlements, and thereby (through people’s desire to feel in control of their choices) to identify with their roles.

    ☛ please register here

    John Enman-Beech
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Doctoral Fellow

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Nov 27, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Regina Rini & Leah Cohen

    Deepfakes, Deep Harms

    Imagine that an online video appears, showing you doing or saying something you would never do. You know it is fake, but not everyone believes you. This scenario may soon be possible, thanks to the use of machine learning to fabricate convincing video and audio recordings, so-called ‘deepfakes’. We look ahead to the dangers of this technology, distinguishing the variety of ways it can harm or wrong people: material, reputational, and existential.

    ☛ please register here

    Regina Rini & Leah Cohen
    York University
    Philosophy


    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Mon, Nov 19, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Murad Idris

    Idealizations of Peace in Islamic Political Thought: The Case of Sayyid Qutb

    “Before us today is the problem of universal peace,” Sayyid Qutb declares in the prologue to his much-neglected Universal Peace and Islam (1951). “Does Islam have an opinion on the matter? Does Islam have a solution?” Albeit popularly considered the ideologue of “Islamic jihad,” the Muslim Brotherhood’s leading theorist designed a plan for universal peace. Qutb’s plan pegs the emergence of universal peace to an immanent organization of individual states with laws in common. Its promise of peace is embedded in an Enlightenment script that claims to correct unjust savagery through the state and the law. This is a script that calls up Immanuel Kant and Thomas Hobbes, specifically their predications of peace upon law and statehood. Drawing attention to Kant’s discussions of “the Arab” and Hobbes’s references to empire, this talk unpacks the unacknowledged salience of denials of law, political economy, and settler-colonialism for theorizations of peace. Qutb’s adaptations of that familiar logic unwittingly expose its limits, culminating with perpetual war against enemies whose laws and form are ‘wrong. This talk draws on a chapter of Idris’s book, War for Peace: Genealogies of a Violent Ideal in Western and Islamic Thought, published by Oxford University Press in Fall 2018. This book deconstructs dominant formulations of peace in the writings of Plato, al-Farabi, Aquinas, Erasmus, Grotius, Gentili, Hobbes, Ibn Khaldun, Immanuel Kant, and Sayyid Qutb.

    ☛ please register here

    Murad Idris
    University of Virginia
    Department of Politics

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Nov 14, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics in the City
    Ethics & Film: Marshall McLuhan's The Burning Would (Ethics in the City Film Series)

    ☛ please register here

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Nov 14, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics in the City
    Ethics in the City: Ken Greenberg

    A Human-centred Use of Technology in Cities

    Advances in technology inevitably play a critical part in the evolution of cities. How they are absorbed, and what impacts they have are open questions. We have good examples and uncomfortable ones. The uncritical euphoria with which we embraced the internal combustion engine in the decades after World War II led to many unforeseen consequences as we reshaped the urban world around the needs of the car. As we recover from that excess, we now have a new and pressing set of challenges in the digital area. The questions for me often come down to how a ‘human-centred’ urbanism could be aided by technology, not be subverted by it. Can we assess potential solutions against human values and decide when to say no, not exactly, bend, inflect and choose.

    ☛ please register here

    Ken Greenberg
    Principal, Greenberg Consultants

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Nov 14, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Nicola Lacetera

    Ethical Concerns and the Reach of Markets: Paying Kidney Donors

    Legislation and public policies are often the result of competition and compromise between different views and interests. In several cases, strongly held moral beliefs voiced by societal groups lead lawmakers to prohibit certain transactions or to prevent them from occurring through markets. However, there is limited evidence about the specific nature of the general population’s opposition to using prices in such contentious transactions. We conducted a choice experiment on a representative sample of Americans to examine preferences for payments to kidney donors. We found strong polarization, with many participants in favor or against payments regardless of potential supply gains. However, about 20% of respondents would switch to supporting payments for sufficiently large supply gains. Preferences for compensation have strong moral foundations. Participants especially oppose systems with payments by organ recipients, which they find in conflict with principles of fairness and dignity. We corroborate the interpretation of the findings with the analysis of a costly decision to donate money to a foundation that supports donor compensation.

    ☛ please register here

    Nicola Lacetera
    University of Toronto
    Department of Management UTM &
    Rotman School of Management

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Nov 13, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Avery Slater

    Kill-Switch: The Ethics of the Halting Problem

    Two centuries of dystopian thought consistently imagined how technologies “out of control” can threaten humanity: with obsolescence at best, with violent systemic destruction at worst. Yet current advances in neural networked machine learning herald the advent of a new ethical question for this established history of critique. If a genuinely conscious form of artificial intelligence arises, it will be wired from its inception as guided by certain incentives, one of which might eventually be its own self-preservation. How can the tradition of philosophical ethics approach this emerging form of intelligence? How might we anticipate the ethical crisis that emerges when machines we cannot turn off cross the existential threshold, becoming beings we should not turn off?

    ☛ please register here

    Avery Slater
    University of Toronto
    Department of English

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Oct 31, 2018

    The Precarious Pathways Project

    The Precarious Pathways Project

    A growing number of people live in Canada with precarious immigration status. These migrants experience barriers accessing many social services, including education. Despite living in Canada and paying taxes, often for many years, they are unable to apply to university as domestic students and pay domestic fees. They are also unable to apply without fear that their immigration status will be discovered and they may be detained or deported. The term ‘precarious immigration status’ encompasses a wide range of experiences, including those who have entered Canada as a visitor but overstayed their visa, those who are still undergoing the – often lengthy – refugee determination process, or those who have come on a work-related visa and have lost their job, among many others.

    Universities can easily reduce these barriers by admitting academically-qualified students with precarious immigration status and charging them domestic fees. It is important to note that it is legal for a university in Canada to admit students with precarious immigration status. Neither the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act nor the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations provide sanctions to punish institutions that do not enforce the requirement of a study permit. It is imperative that universities carefully consider privacy when admitting students with precarious immigration status, as the fear of their immigration status being released or reported is another major barrier to accessing education for this population.

    ☛ please register here

    Presenters:
    Dr. Stephanie J. Silverman
    Almeera Khalid
    Kate Motluk

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Oct 30, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: John Vervaeke

    Why the Creation of A.I. Requires the Cultivation of Wisdom on Our Part

    Abstract:  Most considerations concerning the ethics of A.I. are concerned with the ethical issues posed by the potential threat of the machines or concerning their ambiguous moral status and the resulting unclarity of our ethical obligations towards them.  However, a cognitive scientific approach suggests an additional ethical issue. There is converging theory and empirical evidence that while necessary, intelligence in not sufficient for rationality. Rationality requires acquiring skills for overcoming the  biases and the self-deception that inevitably result from any cognitive agent using optimization strategies.  These heuristic strategies often reinforce each other because of the complex and recursively self-organization nature of cognitive processing.  As our A.I. moves increasingly into Artificial General Intelligence (A.G.I), these patterns of self-deception increasing become possible in our machines. This vulnerability is pertinent to us because we are often unaware of our biases or how we are building them implicitly into our simulations of intelligence.  Since self-deception and foolishness are an inevitable result of intelligence, as we magnify intelligence will may also magnify the capacity for self-deception.  Our lack of rational self-correcting  self-awareness could very well be built into our machines. The examination of a couple of historical examples will add plausibility to this argument.  Given this argument, i will further argue that we have an ethical obligation to seriously cultivate a cognitive style of self-correcting self-awareness, i.e., wisdom, in individuals and communities of individuals who are attempting to create A.G.I.

    ☛ please register here

    John Vervaeke
    University of Toronto
    Cognitive Science

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Fri, Oct 26, 2018
    Events on Campus, Ethics & the Arts, Ethics of AI in Context
    Reading Frankenstein: Then, Now, Next. A Celebration of the 200th Anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818-2018)

    Reading Frankenstein: Then, Now, Next. A Celebration of the 200th Anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818-2018) (October 26-31, 2018)

     

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM


  • Thu, Oct 25, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Derrick Darby

    Du Bois’s Defense of Democracy

    I will reconstruct W. E. B. Du Bois’s argument for democracy in Darkwater and draw a lesson about how to address America’s democratic crisis.

    ☛ please register here

    Derrick Darby
    University of Michigan
    Department of Philosophy

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Oct 24, 2018
    Events on Campus
    Peter Alilunas, Closed (to the Profane) Due to Pressure from the Morality Squad: The Cinema 2000, Porn Studies, and Cultural Consecration

    Peter Alilunas, Closed (to the Profane) Due to Pressure from the Morality Squad: The Cinema 2000, Porn Studies, and Cultural Consecration

    The growth of Porn Studies has been accompanied by an exciting surge in research related to adult film history, which has started to fill in long-neglected gaps in traditional film histories. With this growth, however, the field has also slowly begun constructing familiar boundaries and barriers, valuing and foregrounding some objects of study as worthy of scholarly interest while dismissing or ignoring others. To explore these tensions, this presentation explores a wide variety of historical moments, spaces, and places, and foregrounds the Cinema 2000, the legendary Yonge Street adult theater originally created by Max Allen. Drawing on Pierre Bourdieu’s formulations of “legitimate” cultural pleasures—and the ways in which they must be “closed to the profane”—this presentation will ultimately argue for an open and reflexive approach to studying adult film history.

    Peter Alilunas
    University of Oregon
    Cinema Studies 

    ☛ please register here

    co-sponsored by:

    Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies
    Cinema Studies Institute | Centre for the Study of the United States
    Canadian Studies Program | Centre for Ethics

    04:30 PM - 06:30 PM
    Faculty of Information
    140 St. George St.

  • Wed, Oct 24, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Colin Grey

    Cosmopolitan Pariahs: Exploring the Moral Rationale for Withholding Protection from Criminal Refugees

    Article 1F of the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees excludes from refugee protection persons guilty of serious international and domestic crimes. Excluded persons are not eligible for refugee status even if they face a well-founded fear of persecution. This paper asks whether a coherent rationale for such exclusion is available, focusing on the influential—and strikingly unexamined—suggestion by UNHCR that Article 1F serves to exclude persons who are “undeserving” of refugee protection. If refugees are persons threatened with violations of their basic human rights, as several philosophical and legal accounts hold, we must ask: What could possibly justify abandoning them to their fate? I will argue that exclusion of refugees for past criminality is best explained as the institutional expression of a form of blame that is appropriate if we accept that all human beings on the Earth exist in a juridical relationship of cosmopolitan right, a Kantian construct that is plausibly seen as the animating idea behind the international refugee regime. The construal of the exclusion clauses as an institutional expression of blame, however, is ultimately inconsistent with a strong human rights reading of the international refugee regime. Instead, the exclusion clauses suggest refugee law represents an institutionalized form of humanitarianism. In other words, the ultimate claim of this paper is that we must choose between exclusion and a strong human rights reading of refugee law. We cannot have both.

    ☛ please register here

    Colin Grey
    Université du Québec à Montréal
    Faculty of Political Science and Law

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Oct 23, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics of AI Film Series
    Ethics & Film: WALL-E (Ethics of AI Film Series)

    ☛ please register here

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Oct 22, 2018
    Author Meets Critics
    Author Meets Critics: Hilary Evans Cameron

    Refugee Law’s Fact-finding Crisis: Truth, Risk, and the Wrong Mistake (Cambridge 2018)

    ☛ please register here

    Hilary Evans Cameron
    Postdoctoral Affiliate, Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    Commentators:
    Amar Bhatia
    (Law, York University)
    Catherine Bruce 
    (Refugee Law Office, Toronto)
    Graham Hudson (Criminology, Ryerson)

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Oct 17, 2018
    Events on Campus
    The Sexual Representation Collection Presents: Susanna Paasonen and Jenny Sundèn

    Susanna Paasonen: NSFW, or, Sex as Risk

    The Internet slang term and social media tag NSFW—“Not Safe/Suitable for Work”— is widely used in Anglophone contexts (and beyond) to organize and regulate sexual content and pornographic imagery, often in connection with humor. Zooming in on the tag that functions as both a warning and a lure, this talk examines the logics of content classification and filtering connected to it. More specifically, it asks how the boundaries of risk and danger become drawn in connection with sexuality on online platforms, and on Facebook in particular, as well as what other avenues remain available for considering the distribution of risk and harm online. Refusing the default association of sex and risk, upon which the marker NSFW more or less playfully operates, I argue for shifting focus onto considerations of consent in the circulation of sexual content, as well as for highlighting the value of sexuality in and for people’s lives as these intersect with social media.

    Susanna Paasonen 
    University of Turku, Finland
    Media Studies 


    Jenny Sundén: Play, Secrecy, and Sensitive Data: On Networked Intimacy and Public Sex

    Based on a new materialist analysis of ‘vibrant matter’ (Bennett 2010) to understand the disobedience of sexual objects in toy-based play, in this presentation I investigate the politics of thinking digital technologies as operating partly beyond human forms of agency and control. I use as my core examples privacy breaches and data leaks in the world of networked sex toys – such as a vibrator which allegedly audio recorded its clients’ play sessions without express permission – to engage with questions of intimacy and privacy in digital networks of humans and nonhumans. In particular, the discussion focuses on the consequences of new forms of publicness for how we can understand sexual intimacy and sexual play. What does it mean to be have an intimate moment when connected to a device, a medium, and a network that is by definition public, corporate, and promiscuous (cf. Chun 2016)? And how could we imagine other ways of being intimate and exposed – yet safe – in public digital networks?

    Jenny Sundén
    Södertörn University, Sweden
    Gender Studies

    ☛ please register here

    hosted by:
    Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies

    co-sponsored by:
    Centre for Ethics

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Faculty of Information
    140 St. George St.

  • Tue, Oct 16, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Mark Fox

    Accountable AI Systems 

    The most recent advances of AI technology, namely neural networks, and their application to sophisticated pattern recognition tasks, such as image classification in automated vehicles, has led to a plethora of concerns regarding accountability, often couched in terms of the capability of these algorithms to explain their decisions. This presentation will address a different type of accountability: system accountability. We will look at the architecture of intelligent systems that are made of large numbers of intelligent agents and explore the issues and possible solutions to accountability when decisions and actions are the result of large numbers of individual decisions made by interacting intelligent agents.

    ☛ please register here

    Mark S. Fox
    University of Toronto
    Distinguished Professor of Urban Systems Engineering

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Oct 16, 2018
    Public Lectures
    Ruth Gavison, Israel and the Legacy of World War II

    The lecture will address the question whether it was WWII that in fact enabled the foundation of Israel, and the question whether it is justified that the world make the Palestinians pay for the horrors of the Holocaust. While the Holocaust ‘helped,’ the Jewish national infrastructure built in Palestine from the 1880s was a critical necessary condition for Israel’s foundation in 1948.

    Ruth Gavison
    Hebrew University
    Faculty of Law

    presented by:
    Anne Tanenbaum Centre for Jewish Studies

    co-sponsored by:
    Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures | Centre for Diaspora and Transnational Studies | Centre for Ethics  | Centre for European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies (Munk School of Global Affairs)  | Department of History  | Joint Initiative in German and European Studies and the German Academic Exchange Service | Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations | Konstanty Reynert Chair of Polish History | Al and Malka Green Program in Yiddish Studies

    01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Oct 15, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Nils Holtug

    Does Nationhood Promote Egalitarian Justice? Challenging the National Identity Argument

    According to the national identity argument, a shared national identity is important for two aspects of social cohesion that, in particular, are required for egalitarian, distributive justice, namely trust and solidarity. I critically discuss the national identity argument as it pertains to social justice. I first provide a more detailed account of the argument. Then I consider, in greater detail, different conceptions of the nation on which the national identity argument may rely. Furthermore, I assess two theoretical arguments for why we should expect national identities to promote social cohesion and so distributive justice. According to the first, a shared identity tends to produce the emotional disposition towards compatriots required for trust and solidarity. According to the second, sharing an identity with someone tends to make their behaviour more predictable which makes it easier to trust them. However, neither of these two accounts of the causal mechanism leading from a national identity to trust and solidarity establishes the need for a national identity, or so I argue. For the purpose of assessing the empirical studies that test the national identity argument, I then decompose the argument in terms of the different elements that may be thought to causally impact social cohesion. On this basis, I survey the empirical evidence for and against the national identity argument. One worry pertaining to these studies is that, very often, they do not appropriately distinguish between different conceptions of the nation, or at least do not do so along the lines that political theorists have thought important. Therefore, I go into greater depth with a recent Danish study I have conducted with two colleagues – a study that aims more specifically to test the impact on trust and solidarity of conservative and liberal nationalist identities. I conclude that, just as the theoretical explanations to which nationalists appeal do not sufficiently support the national identity argument, nor does the empirical evidence that has been gathered so far.

    ☛ please register here

    Nils Holtug
    University of Copenhagen
    Director, Centre for Advanced Migration Studies
    Professor of Political Philosophy
    Philosophy Section
    Department of Media, Cognition and Communication

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Fri, Oct 12, 2018
    C4E Flash Event, Ethics of AI in Context
    Crime Prediction Support System (CPSS): A State-of-the-Art Artificial Intelligence Based Expert System for Crime Prediction (with E.G. Rajan) (Kelly Hannah-Moffat, commentator)

    Crime Prediction Support System (CPSS): A State-of-the-Art Artificial Intelligence Based Expert System for Crime Prediction (w/ E.G. Rajan) (Kelly Hannah-Moffat, commentator)

    We are in the process of developing a Reliable, Robust and Fast Crime Prediction Support System (CPSS) using novel machine learning techniques that work on genuine crime data bases without causing any damage to the dignity of any ethnic society.

    Objective
    1. To develop a state-of-the-art Crime Analytics and Prediction Support System that involves a plethora of software components and IoT
    2. To customize the product for the benefit of individuals, security agencies, real estate businessmen, media, various research and service organizations

    Sub Objects
    1. To help organize global old and current raw crime data for format standardization (to start with US and Indian crime data)
    2. To train individuals and groups (intelligence agencies) in crime prediction and predictive policing
    3. To develop various modules and integrate CPSS with RedZone Map (a pioneering product developed by Zone Technologies Inc)
    4. To help maintain and upgrade CPSS periodically

    ☛ please register here

    Presenter:
    Prof. Dr. E.G. Rajan

    President & Chairman
    Pentagram Group of Companies

    http://www.pentagramresearch.com

     

    Commentator:
    Kelly Hannah-Moffat
    University of Toronto

    Professor of Sociology
    Vice-President, Human Resources & Equity
     

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Oct 10, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics in the City
    Ethics in the City: Mark Kingwell

    Human Cities, Posthuman Cities

    Traditional urban philosophy has focussed on the relationship between humans and their built environments. Thus the emphasis on spaces, forms and circulatory systems as conditioned by the physical features of people. A standard injunction of such philosophy would then be to make cities ‘more human’. But what if the standard human body is no longer the baseline for consciousness within cities? In such a case, cities would have to be reconceived at a basic level.

    ☛ please register here

    Mark Kingwell
    University of Toronto
    Philosophy

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Oct 3, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics in the City
    Ethics & Film: Urbanized (Ethics in the City Film Series)

    ☛ please register here

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Oct 3, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Kimmo Nuotio

    ☛ please register here

    What’s Wrong and What’s Right with Deterrence Theories in Criminal Law

    Criminal law has many aims, one of them being that it seeks to influence human conduct. Criminal law has in-built theories about human action. Often some sort of rational action theory serves as a model. According to classical law and economics, human beings can be deterred by keeping the costs of offending high enough. The model of rational economic action has famously been challenged by findings of the so-called behavioral economics and law. Human beings simply fail to act rationally when studied empirically. Behavioral law and economics has created its own way, even its own language, to study law and regulation. We all know about ‘endowment’, ‘bounded rationality’, ‘nudging’, and ‘choice architecture’.

    The theory of positive general prevention, well known to Continental criminal law scholars, works on somewhat different premises than classical law and economics. According to that theory, human beings are able to internalize the moral and ethical values that the criminal law tells about which in turn gives individuals additional reasons not to offend. This theory could even be linked with the theory of a democratic Rechtsstaat, since the citizens quite obviously have reasons to respect legitimate norms. Even legal doctrines which provide for legal security and predictability could contribute to the legitimacy of criminal law.

    We should also mention regulatory theory, which has equally departed from classical law and economics. According to regulatory theory, at least if we read Christopher Hodges, no-blame cultures are most efficient as means to improve the quality of human action, be it in terms of security in civil aviation, or reducing malpractice by medical professionals. Often the solution seems to be to choose another regulatory option than criminal law. For serious violations of interests of others we may still need criminal law. From a regulatory point of view criminal law would still always also interact with ethics and social norms since criminalisations trigger effects on the side of the legal subjects, and on the side of the society at large. Hodges claims that behavioral law and economics is not enough to found socio-legal structures on the reality of how people make decisions. He tries to build an integrated theory, integrating theories of regulation, enforcement, compliance and ethics.

    I wish to look at more closely whether behavioral law and economics as well as the theory of regulation call for a reassessment of how we should think about criminal law as a way of regulating behavior. Is behavioral economics still too narrow, too utilitarian, to be relevant for criminal law theory? Isn’t it too reductionist in its style? How would regulatory theory see this? Should we only adopt the psychology part of it?

    It seems that the various approaches to and understandings about seeking to influence human behavior have very different criminal policy implications. As concerns environmental criminal law or economic criminal law, to take two examples, the Chicago-style law and economics leads to stressing the severity of (criminal) sanctions, whereas positive general prevention would leave more room for additional ethical reasons for actors in a company frame to work for minimizing the risk of crime. We do not need severe punishments to communicate blame. Much of EU criminal law seems to build on negative general deterrence.

    It looks as if it makes sense to stress that criminal law possesses certain specific qualities which go beyond simple instrumental and utilitarian concerns. The theory of positive general prevention might work even if we cannot expect people to act rationally. As criminal law uses blameworthiness to communicate values, this goes well together with the idea that the individuals should be approached as responsible citizens who have the ability to learn to do better. We need to go beyond a utilitarian theory of regulating behavior. This could even be a paradox: we have to introduce non-instrumental views about how criminal law is anchored in the society in order to truly understand how criminal law operates and becomes functional. There is different politics of criminal law involved, and a different view of the society.

    Nicola Lacey has put it aptly:

    ‘… as democratization proceeds, with the normative implication that the regulatory subject should be treated not only as a rational chooser but also in some stronger sense as an agent – as someone who not only makes choices but has some deeper form of responsibility for those choices, as a queen and not as a pawn – a non-instrumental attachment to the responsibility condition emerges.’ ‘Criminalization as Regulation’, in, Regulating Law (Eds. Parker et al), Oxford 2004, 158-159.

    Kimmo Nuotio
    University of Helsinki
    Faculty of Law

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Oct 2, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Moshe Vardi

    The Ethical Crisis in Computing?

    Computer scientists think often of “Ender’s Game” these days. In this award-winning 1985 science-fiction novel by Orson Scott Card, Ender is being trained at Battle School, an institution designed to make young children into military commanders against an unspecified enemy. Ender’s team engages in a series of computer-simulated battles,
    eventually destroying the enemy’s planet, only to learn then that
    the battles were very real and a real planet has been destroyed.

    Many of us got involved in computing because programming was fun.
    The benefits of computing seemed intuitive to us. We truly believe
    that computing yields tremendous societal benefits; for example, the
    life-saving potential of driverless cars is enormous! Like Ender,
    however, we realized recently that computing is not a game–it is
    real–and it brings with it not only societal benefits, but also
    significant societal costs, such as labor polarization, disinformation,
    and smart-phone addiction.

    The common reaction to this crisis is to label it as an “ethical crisis”
    and the proposed response is to add courses in ethics to the academic
    computing curriculum. I will argue that the ethical lens is too narrow.
    The real issue is how to deal with technology’s impact on society.
    Technology is driving the future, but who is doing the steering?

    ☛ please register here

    Moshe Vardi
    Rice University
    Karen Ostrum George Distinguished Service Professor in Computational Engineering
    Director, Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Mon, Oct 1, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Simone Chambers

    Democracy and Constitutional Reform: Deliberative Versus Populist Constitutionalism

    Whereas, populism has sometimes been thought to be a movement that attempts to bypass, discredit, or suspend constitutions, contemporary populism has often progressed and gained ground through embracing and claiming ownership over national constitutions and the “people.” The cases that I look at are Hungary, Poland, Turkey and Venezuela but the threat is quite broad.
    Populist constitutionalism poses a problem for scholars and citizens alike who believe that constitutional politics should also be democratic politics. How do we tell the difference between democratically driven constitutionalism and populist constitutionalism? How can citizens participate in constitution-making without hijacking constitutionalism for majoritarian, nationalist, and authoritarian ends?
    One of the challenges in identifying normative objections to populist constitutionalism is how to hold on to essential ideas of popular sovereignty and citizen participation without surrendering constitution-making and constitutional limits to the anti-pluralist forces of populism. Deliberative constitutionalism, because it invests popular sovereignty in processes of collective egalitarian discourse rather than in outcomes of majoritarian procedures or an identifiable general will is in a good position to offer a critical yard stick for questioning the democratic credentials (not just liberal) of populist constitutionalism.
    In this paper I lay out the main features of populist constitutionalism and then contrast it with three alternatives: liberal constitutionalism, popular constitutionalism, and deliberative constitutionalism. I argue that only deliberative constitutionalism offers a model of constitutional reform that includes citizens but offers practical advice for excluding or mitigating populist forces. The use of referendums in Scotland and Ireland are used as illustrations of deliberate appeals to citizens in constitutional questions.

    ☛ please register here

    Simone Chambers
    UC Irvine
    Political Science

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Fri, Sep 28, 2018
    C4E Flash Event, Ethics of AI in Context
    Flash Event: Bots at the Gate: A Human Rights Analysis of Automated Decision Making in Canada’s Immigration and Refugee System (w/ Petra Molnar)

    Bots at the Gate: A Human Rights Analysis of Automated Decision Making in Canada’s Immigration and Refugee System

    Canada is experimenting with the use of automated decision-making, or AI, in its immigration system. A brand new report by the International Human Rights Program and the Citizen Lab looks at how algorithms and automated decision making will augment or replace human decision makers in Canada’s immigration and refugee system and highlights how the use of these technologies threatens to create a laboratory for high-risk experiments within an already highly discretionary system. Vulnerable and under-resourced communities such as non-citizens often have access to less robust human rights protections and fewer resources with which to defend those rights. Adopting these technologies in an irresponsible manner may only serve to exacerbate these disparities.

    ☛ please register here

    Petra Molnar
    University of Toronto Faculty of Law
    International Human Rights Program

    02:30 PM - 04:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Sep 25, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics of AI Film Series
    Ethics & Film: Ex Machina (Ethics of AI Film Series)

    ☛ please register here

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Sep 24, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Kali Gross

    The Butcher of Richard Street: Hannah Mary Tabbs, Black Womanhood, Violence, and Sovereignty

    Hannah Mary Tabbs, an African American southern migrant, was accused of throwing the severed torso of her paramour off of a bridge in Eddington, Pennsylvania, in 1887. Through the trial and investigation Tabbs emerged at once as a figure steeped in the horror and tragedy of American slavery and its violent aftermath and as a brutal neighborhood terror in her own right. Whereas most studies of black women in this era focus on their victimization, this research explores an instance of black female violence that did not appear to be explicitly motivated by self-defense or even financial gain but rather by the sheer thrill of the exercise of power and domination, and, ultimately, pleasure. Further, this presentation ponders whether a black woman’s decision to mobilize violence on her own behalf may uniquely sketch and challenge the interstices of race, gender, sexuality, and state power.

    ☛ please register here

    Kali Gross
    Rutgers University
    Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of History

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Sep 19, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Rachel Cristy

    Justice in Nietzsche’s Virtue Epistemology

    This paper examines Nietzsche’s peculiar use of the word “justice” [Gerechtigkeit] and related terms, especially in the second of the Untimely Meditations, “On the Uses and Disadvantages of History for Life,” but also continuing into his later works, notably On the Genealogy of Morality. Nietzsche’s usage is peculiar in two major respects. First, he speaks of justice primarily as an epistemic virtue or attitude rather than a moral or practical one: justice is a matter of attributing to everything (events, institutions, agents) the appropriate level of importance and value; Nietzsche claims that all actions, even (morally) just ones, require a stance of epistemic injustice. Second, “justice” in Nietzsche’s writing often has an affective cast: it is not merely a reliable disposition but a “will,” a “drive,” with a distinctive associated state of mind; it is not indifference or impassivity, the lack of interest or preference, but rather, as Nietzsche puts it in the Genealogy, “justice is always a positive affect.” I interpret these data by reading Nietzsche, following Alfano (2013), as a virtue epistemologist of the “inquiry responsibilist” type, who is interested not in offering definitions of knowledge of justification but in the mindset and attitudes appropriate to knowledge-seeking and the place of inquiry in a good human life. Finally, I offer some connections between Nietzsche’s unusual understanding of “justice” and some of his larger concerns, including his perspectivist epistemology and his critique of (post-)Christian morality.

    ☛ please register here

    Rachel Cristy
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Postdoctoral Fellow in Ethics

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Sep 18, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Lea Ypi

    Eleven Theses on Migration in the Capitalist State

    For much of the past century, the expansion of the political franchise and the related exercise of political rights meant that citizenship had the potential of being a vehicle of political emancipation. Democratic citizenship was essential to opposing capitalism with radical social reforms; it was one of the cornerstones of egalitarian policy for social democrats around the world. Contemporary trends in the admission of immigrants illustrate that citizenship has become once more increasingly selective, a good to be bought, sold or denied at the will of political elites, accessible once again along class lines. In light of these trends, I argue that citizenship has turned from a vehicle of political emancipation to one of social oppression.  I focus on contemporary practices of migrant integration and try to show how they are instrumental to consolidating the oligarchical character of the capitalist state and to entrenching its class divisions.

    ☛ please register here

    Lea Ypi
    London School of Economics
    Professor in Political Theory
    Department of Government

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Mon, Sep 17, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Klaus Günther

    Freedom in a Universe of Echoes?

    When we are going online, we cannot avoid that our data are collected. Private and (some) governmental organizations use these data to produce a personal profile of you and me, some for observation and surveillance, others for mirroring and continuously confirming my individual preferences, choices, my activities, thoughts, emotions by offering corresponding products. Something similar happens in social networks. Many users are looking for other people who confirm what they are thinking, saying and doing. Others participate in groups which are constituted by a shared world view or at least a shared view on some issues, whose members encourage each other to maintain their view. Of course it always happens that these people are confronted with information or with views which are different, which do not coincide with what they are thinking. But in a universe of echoes, dissent and dissonance, criticism and contestation are only one more opportunity to confirm or slightly modify one´s own view, but not to change it or to give it up. Conspiracy theories are the most prominent examples of such a method. In my presentation, I shall ask for the consequences to our freedom. When we make a choice in a universe of echoes – is this still a free choice? Or does freedom require the experience of dissent, contestation, and even of failure and learning? If the answer to the last question were yes, then freedom would be lost in a universe of echoes.

    ☛ please register here

    Klaus Günther
    Goethe-Universitãt Frankfurt a.M.
    Faculty of Law & Excellence Cluster “Normative Orders”

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Thu, Sep 13, 2018
    Public Lectures
    Atsushi Moriya: "Harmony Between Morality and Business: The Philosophy of Shibusawa Eiichi"

    Harmony Between Morality and Business: The Philosophy of Shibusawa Eiichi

    A lecture by:
    Atsushi Moriya
    Scholar in Residence
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

    Shibusawa Eiichi (1840-1931) is regarded as the father of Japanese capitalism. He founded nearly 500 enterprises and economic organizations, most of which operate to this day. Equally dedicated to social and public welfare, he launched 600 philanthropic programs in many areas, including social welfare, education, and international exchange. His basic philosophy in the management of businesses was the harmony between morality and business.
    In recent years his thought has drawn increasing international attention for its ethical vision of capitalism as an alternative to the untrammeled profit-seeking and capital accumulation characteristic of contemporary market economies. His most famous work, The Analects and the Abacus, has been translated into Chinese nine times.
    This lecture will offer an overview of Shibusawa Eiichi’s thought, its roots in Confucian ethics, and its implications for 21st-century economic systems.

    Atsushi Moriya is a writer and a researcher. He is an expert in ancient
    Chinese thought and the thought of Shibusawa Eiichi, and has translated Shibusawa Eiichi’s books into modern Japanese. His translation of Shibusawa’s The Analects and the Abacus has sold over 130,000 copies.

    To register, please click here.

    Co-sponsored by



    06:30 PM - 08:00 PM
    Japan Foundation
    2 Bloor Street East, Suite 300

  • Fri, May 11, 2018
    Conferences
    Globalization and Its Critics in the 21st Century

    The 6th Annual
    University of Toronto
    Centre for Ethics

    Graduate Student Conference
    May 11-12, 2018

    Globalization and Its Critics in the 21st Century will take the opportunity to consider the ethical implications of the resurgence of anti-globalization movements, in an interdisciplinary setting. We will look at the categories and concepts that different disciplines have used to understand, defend, or critique globalization and its critics, and ask whether they remain adequate frameworks for thinking about contemporary developments.

    Further information, including a conference schedule, is available here.

    Keynote Speaker:
    Bernard Yack
    Lerman Neubauer Professor of Democracy and Public Policy
    Brandeis University

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, May 10, 2018
    Book Symposium
    Book Symposium: Abraham Rotstein, Myth, Mind and Religion

    Myth, Mind and Religion: The Apocalyptic Narrative (Peter Lang 2017)

    Abraham Rotstein (1929-2015) (Economics & Political Science, University of Toronto)

    Commentators:
    Ruth Marshall (Religion and Political Science, University of Toronto)
    Stephen Scharper (Anthropology, Religion, and School of Environment, University of Toronto)
    Igor Shoikhedbrod (Political Science, University of Toronto)

    Moderator: Kyumin Ju (Political Science, University of Toronto). 

    The French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss scoured the Amazon forest for the myths of its primitive peoples. He found that a certain logic governed the construction of these myths—his mythologique; he regarded this logic as innate in the human mind and thus universal. Despite this claim of universality, Lévi-Strauss deliberately sidestepped the myths of the biblical religions as well as the myths of modern societies. This proved to be a missed opportunity since these myths lend themselves very well to his mode of analysis.

    The apocalyptic narrative is the ongoing myth of Western society. It makes its first appearance in the Bible in the story of the Exodus and in the Passion of Christ. Its characteristic feature is its opening scenario of one or another form of unendurable oppression— whether the Pharaoh in Egypt for the Jews or the bondage of the body for Christians. “Lord and servant” is the binary pair that prevails and through a process of inversion leads to the Kingdom of Heaven (celestial or terrestrial). The work of Augustine and Luther follow suit as surprisingly enough, do the Lutheran Hegel and the Hegelian Marx. In every case, the initial oppression is inverted and a sublime destination ensues.

    A demonic version of the same apocalyptic narrative appears in the 1930s. The Nazis point to their own tale of ‘oppression’ of the German people and in the same fashion proclaim the Dritte Tausendjährige Reich. It is a terrible irony but perhaps Lévi-Strauss’s mythologique may help us to see through the ‘glass’ a little less darkly.

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, May 4, 2018
    Events on Campus, Critical Ethics
    Rainer Forst, A Critical Theory of Transnational (In-)Justice: Realistic in the Right Way

    Rainer Forst
    Professor of Political Theory & Philosophy
    Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M.

    hosted by:

    co-sponsored by:

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Solarium, Faculty of Law
    84 Queen's Park, Falconer Hall

  • Thu, May 3, 2018
    Critical Ethics
    C4E Master Class with Rainer Forst

    Noumenal Alienation: Rousseau, Kant and Marx on the Dialectics of Self-Determination

    Alienation (as Entfremdung) should be understood as a particular form of individual and social heteronomy that can only be overcome by a dialectical combination of individual and collective autonomy, recovering a deontological sense of normative authority. If we think about alienation in Kantian terms, the main source of alienation is a denial of standing or, in the extreme, losing a sense of oneself as a rational normative authority equal to all others. I call the former kind of alienation, where persons deny others equal standing as a normative authority in moral or political terms, first order noumenal alienation, as there is no proper mutual cognition and recognition of each other in such a social context. I call the latter kind of alienation, where a subject does not consider themselves an equal normative authority or an end in oneself’ – second order noumenal alienation (again, in a moral and a political form). In this sense, alienation violates the dignity of humans as moral and political lawgivers a dignity seen by Rousseau, Kant and Marx as inalienable: It can be denied or violated, but it cannot be lost. [full-text link]

    This interactive event is intended for graduate and professional students and postdocs. Participants should be prepared to discuss the above article by Professor Forst. To register, please click below (by May 1): 

    Rainer Forst
    Professor of Political Theory & Philosophy
    Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M.

    hosted by:

    co-sponsored by:

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Apr 13, 2018
    Events on Campus
    Stefan Gosepath, Is Inheritance Justified?

    This essay is concerned with the question of whether it is just that people inherit property. What should happen to private property after the death of the person owning it? Should the owner, while alive, be entitled to transfer their property holdings for the time after their death, to a person of their choosing? Is such a right to pass one’s property on posthumously a part of the right to private property?

    The intuition I want to begin to explore states that the common social practice of inheritance (embodied in law and institutions) is in fact pro tanto unjust, since it confers an unjust advantage on the beneficiary. The first step, as undertaken in this essay, will be to ask, very abstractly for now, whether bestowing or receiving an inheritance or a bequest is just. This part of the inquiry, then, is situated within the realm of abstract and ideal political philosophy or theory.

    Stefan Gosepath
    Professor of Practical Philosophy at the Free University Berlin (Germany)
    Co-Director, Centre for Advanced Studies “Justitia Amplificata: Rethinking Justice: Applied and Global”

    Commentator:
    Waheed Hussain
    Assistant Professor of Philosophy, University of Toronto

    hosted by

    co-sponsored by

    02:30 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 3130, Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George St.

  • Thu, Apr 12, 2018
    Conferences
    CRÉ/C4E 2018!

    This year’s installment of the annual CRÉ/C4E Montréal/Toronto joint workshop will take place at C4E, in Toronto. (If you’re interested in attending, please register below.)

    Here’s the schedule (and here are the abstracts):

    CRÉ/C4E 2018
    4.12/13.18

    April 12
    I 1-2:20
    Christine Tappolet & Mauro Rossi, “Happiness as an Affective Evaluation”
    Willem van der Deijl, “Is Pleasure All that Is Good About Experience?”

    II 2:30-3:50
    Aaron Ansell, “Dirty Compromise: The Ethics of Making Concessions to Injustice”
    Simon Lambek, “Receiving Rhetoric and the Hermeneutics of the Self”

    III 4:00-5:20
    Charles Dupras, ” Epigenetic Discrimination: Should We Rely on Recent Policies Against Genetic Discrimination for Oversight?”
    Hazar Haidar, “Expanding the scope of Non Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT) Uses: Ethical Considerations for Policy Decision-Making”

    April 13
    IV 9:30-10:50
    Stephanie Silverman, “A Difficult, Multilayered Conversation: The Promises and Perils of Incremental Abolitionism in Immigration Detention”
    Hilary Evans Cameron, “Logics of Legal Reasoning: Truth, Risk, and Inference to the Best Explanation”

    V 11-12:20
    John-Stewart Gordon, “Moral Rights for Intelligent Robots?”
    Pablo Gilabert, “Human Dignity and Human Rights”

    VI 1-2:20
    Richard Moon, “Conscientious Objection in Canada: Pragmatic Accommodation and Principled Adjudication”
    Étienne Brown, “Misinformation as Harmful Speech”

    Eventbrite - Judgement, Relationality, Care: A Celebration of the Work of Jennifer Nedelsky

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Apr 10, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Moonlight

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Apr 4, 2018
    Public Lectures, Ethics & the Arts
    Peter Brooks, The Chameleon Poet and the Ethics of Reading (C4E Public Lecture)

    My understanding of an “ethics of reading” stands more with John Keats’ “chameleon poet” than with his “virtuous philosopher.” Starting from my reaction to the U.S. “torture memos” (post 9/11), I explore what an ethics of reading might mean, and what is peculiar to the literature classroom. I then pursue the idea by way of the concept of a literary “character”: how we have learned to reach fictional persons, why we want and need them, and what kind of an ethical investment they propose to readers. Among a number of examples, that of Proust will be crucial here.

    Peter Brooks
    Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Scholar, Comparative Literature and University Center for Human Values

    Princeton University

    co-sponsored by:

     

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Apr 2, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics, Events on Campus
    Shai Lavi, Is Medicalization Secular? Regulating Circumcision in Germany, Turkey, and Israel

    Shai Lavi
    Director, Van Leer Jerusalem Institute

    hosted by:

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 100, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Wed, Mar 28, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Ryan Liss

    Crime at the Limits of Sovereignty:

    The jurisdictional framework governing the prosecution and punishment of international crimes is unusual. While the prosecution of domestic crimes is ordinarily limited to the courts of states with a connection to the offence or offender, such connections are not required in the context of international criminal punishment. Those accused of international crimes (such as crimes against humanity or war crimes) can be tried before the courts of foreign states that are unconnected to the offence, or before international tribunals. In this talk, I examine how this reality raises the question of whether the international criminal law framework and the unique scope of the right to punish it entails can be justified. I examine the shortcomings of existing theories of what might justify international criminal punishment. I also begin to sketch out a new theory, grounded in an historical account of the field, highlighting the connection between parallel changes in ideas of state sovereignty and the definition of international crime over recent centuries.

    Ryan Liss
    Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow
    Centre for Ethics

    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Mar 27, 2018
    Science|Ethics|Tech, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics of AI Film Series
    Ethics of AI Film Series: Her

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Mar 27, 2018
    Science|Ethics|Tech, Ethics in the City
    Ronald Deibert, These Are the Sensors in My Neighbourhood (Ethics in the City Series)

    As almost everyone knows by now, we share a lot of highly-revealing and sensitive data with companies. But what those companies do with that data, whether they share it or not with third parties, and just how much of it they collect and retain, is still largely a mystery. Drawing from Citizen Lab reports, in my talk I will review the exploding universe of “big data” collection, the accumulating fine-grained sensors that facilitate it, and the public policy, security, and privacy issues that accompany it.

    Ronald Deibert
    Director, The Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, Mar 22, 2018

    Deborah Stone, Why Statistics Should be Taught as Ethics, Not Math

    From simple tallies to complex quantitative analyses, counting necessarily requires value choices. Historically, measurement has always been intimately connected to notions of distributive justice and procedural fairness. This talk explores some of these connections and what it means to count with integrity.

    Deborah Stone is a Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University, and an Honorary Professor of Political Science at Aarhus University in Denmark. A specialist in health and social policy, she is the author of numerous articles and four books, including the renowned Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making, which won the American Political Science Association’s Wildavsky Award for an Enduring Contribution to Policy Studies, and The Samaritan’s Dilemma, a call for harnessing altruism, rather than self-interest, as the moral engine of political life. Her lifetime of distinguished contribution to political science was recently recognized with the APSA’s prestigious James Madison Award in 2017.

    Stone is one of the co-founders and sits on the editorial board of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law. In addition to academic publications, she has written for The American Prospect, Nation, New Republic, Boston Review, salon.com, and some natural history magazines. She has served as a consultant to the Social Security Administration, the Institute of Medicine, the Office of Technology Assessment, and the Human Genome Project, and more recently, to The Asia Foundation Nepal, where she helped establish a public policy institute called Niti Foundation.

    Stone holds a B.A. in Russian Studies from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in Political Science from MIT.

    This seminar is co-sponsored by the School of Public Policy & Governance and the Centre for Ethics at the University of Toronto.

    Lunch will be served.

    Admission is free by registration and open to the public. Register here.

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 21, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics in the City
    Building Cities Better, Building Better Cities: Are We Building Smart Cities on Dumb Information Systems? (Ethics in the City Series)

    The advent of Smart Cities has seen an explosion of research, development and deployment of applications that take advantage of the convergence of technologies such as Artificial Intelligence, Web-based information systems, mobile technologies, and the Cloud. But lurking beneath these applications is a city-wide information system (Urban Operating System) whose architecture is rooted in the previous century. Just as cities have physical infrastructures that are over 100 years old, city operating systems are often legacy systems over 10-20 years old. Yet, the Urban OS is fast becoming the primary means by which citizens and corporations interact with the city. It is becoming the face of the city. How do we want to interact with the city?. More importantly, how do we want the Urban OS to behave when the city and the Urban OS are the same? In this presentation we explore the question of how the future Urban OS should behave and not just how they are constructed.

    Mark S. Fox
    University of Toronto Distinguished Professor of Urban Systems Engineering

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Mar 20, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Kathryn Hume

    Ethical Algorithms: Bias and Explainability in Machine Learning Systems

    Over the past year, discourse about the ethical risks of machine learning has largely shifted from speculative fear about rogue superintelligent systems to critical examination of machine learning’s propensity to exacerbate patterns of discrimination in society. This talk explains how and why bias creeps into supervised machine learning systems and proposes a framework businesses can apply to hold algorithmic systems accountable in a way that is meaningful to people impacted by systems. You’ll learn why it’s important to consider bias throughout the entire machine learning product lifecycle (not just algorithms), how to assess tradeoffs between accuracy and explainability, and what technical solutions are available to reduce bias and promote fairness.
    [☛ eVideo]

    Kathryn Hume
    integrate.ai

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Mar 16, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Zhichao Tong, Epistemic Democracy and International Relations 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 3130, Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George St.

  • Fri, Mar 16, 2018

    Julian Savulescu, The Science and Ethics of Moral Enhancement

    The Science and Ethics of Moral Enhancement

    The greatest problems of the 21st century – climate change, environmental degradation, terrorism, poverty, global inequality, mass migration, depletion of resources, infectious diseases, abuse and neglect of children – are predominantly the result of human choice and behaviour. The greatest problems humanity now faces are not the result of external threat, but are the result of human choice. They are caused by human moral limitations.

    Human moral psychology has been shaped by its evolutionary history. It is characterized by aggression, restricted altruism, partiality to kin and in-group members, hostility and disregard of out-group members, bias towards the near future and limited co-operation including free riding. These dispositions have generated common sense moralities which are characterized by strong prohibitions against harming in-group members, few requirements for beneficence or aiding, especially out-group members, a causal sense of responsibility which places greater weight on the consequences of acts in the near future, affecting in-group members, with little consideration given to the foreseeable consequences of omissions.

    These dispositions and articulated moral norms expose humanity to unprecedented threats in the modern world of advanced technology and global community. Liberal democracy increases the threat our limited moral dispositions pose to our survival and flourishing. I will focus on violence, global poverty and climate change. I argue that we should not rest content with our current strategies for addressing these problems. I argue that we should look to not only policies tailored to our moral limitations, but to altering the biological dispositions which contribute to these limitations. I sketch briefly how this might be possible. I argue that research into human moral bioenhancement is an urgent priority.

    Julian Savulescu
    Director, The Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics

    02:00 PM - 04:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 14, 2018
    Science|Ethics|Tech, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics in the City
    Countering the Digital Consensus: The Political Economy of the Smart City (Ethics in the City Series)

    What are the risks related to the trend of increasingly technocratic governance? How might it enable the commercialization of the public service? How can government respond to this mounting digital and data-driven consensus?

    Bianca Wylie
    Head, Open Data Institute Toronto

    Co-Founder, Tech Reset Canada

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Mar 14, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Jeremy Davis

    The Algebra of Partiality

    Most people agree that we are permitted to do more for those with whom we stand in certain special relationships, subject to several constraints. But most also agree that the presence of partiality does not eliminate our more general moral reasons to others. In some cases, however, these two sets of reasons must be compared; thus, we need to know how these two sets of reasons weigh against each other. But just how much extra weight can partiality justify?

    Much has been written on the question of whether or not our reasons of partiality may override certain of our positive duties of beneficence to others—for example, our duties to provide aid and famine relief to the global poor. While there is disagreement about the grounds and the extent of such partiality, many philosophers believe that we may indeed give some preference to our co-nationals over outsiders. By contrast, very little has been said concerning the question of how to weigh our various duties of partiality against our negative duties of non-maleficence to outsiders—in particular, our duties to avoid harming or killing them. While the issue of beneficence arises most naturally in discussions of global justice, the question of our duties of non-maleficence is especially pressing in the context of war, which generally involves risking, harming, or killing many innocent people, some of whom are our co-nationals, but many of whom are not. Whereas many philosophers accept that our duties to our co-nationals may in some cases outweigh our duties of beneficence to outsiders, very few philosophers accept that we may prefer our co-nationals when it comes to duties of non-maleficence to outsiders.

    My goal in this talk is to illustrate—literally and figuratively—how can sometimes justify overriding certain otherwise weighty negative duties to those with whom we share no special relationship in order to satisfy duties, both positive and negative, that we have towards those with whom we do share such a special relationship. As I will argue, this conclusion follows from endorsing certain plausible assumptions about the relative base weights of various duties, as well as what I will show to be the most plausible account for how to determine the added weight that partiality affords.

    Jeremy Davis
    Centre for Ethics & Department of Philosophy
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Mar 13, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: The Second Mother

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Mar 12, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics, Ethics & the Arts
    Perspectives on Ethics: Jessica Rosenfeld

    Winners, Wasters, and the Shadow of Envy: Theories of Justice and the Scene of Medieval Literature

    Is envy at the root of all claims for justice (so says Freud), or is envy a regrettable but surmountable human tendency that will be minimized in a just society (as Rawls has it)?  Should we, as newer political and feminist theory has suggested, take envy seriously as a “political emotion” and allow it to direct the building of a better democracy?  My talk will trace the recent history of envy’s role in theorizing social justice and then turn to medieval literature as a terrain of close attention to envy, not only as a “deadly sin,” but as an emotion that provokes the social imagination, and the articulation of the move from the individual to the political.  The figures of the winner (upstanding citizen) and waster (profligate spender, “welfare queen”) have a long history, and can help us to understand the passages between the personal and the social, the economic and the affective, and perhaps to disentangle the threads of envy, resentment, and justice.

    Jessica Rosenfeld
    Washington University in St. Louis
    English

    co-sponsored by

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Mar 7, 2018
    Author Meets Critics
    Author Meets Critics: Richard Moon

    Putting Faith in Hate: When Religion Is the Source or Target of Hate Speech (Cambridge 2018)

    Richard Moon
    Faculty of Law
    University of Windsor

    Commentators:
    Mohammad Fadel
    (Law & Religion, University of Toronto)
    Anna Korteweg (Sociology, University of Toronto)
    Ruth Marshall (Religion & Political Science, University of Toronto)

    To allow or restrict hate speech is a hotly debated issue in many societies. While the right to freedom of speech is fundamental to liberal democracies, most countries have accepted that hate speech causes significant harm and ought to be regulated. Richard Moon examines the application of hate speech laws when religion is either the source or target of such speech. Moon describes the various legal restrictions on hate speech, religious insult, and blasphemy in Canada, Europe and elsewhere, and uses cases from different jurisdictions to illustrate the particular challenges raised by religious hate speech. The issues addressed are highly topical: speech that attacks religious communities, specifically anti-Muslim rhetoric, and hateful speech that is based on religious doctrine or scripture, such as anti-gay speech. The book draws on a rich understanding of freedom of expression, the harms of hate speech, and the role of religion in public life.

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Mar 7, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Simon Lambek

    Nietzsche’s Rhetoric and the Politics of Possibility

    This talk addresses the question of Nietzsche’s style and presents a reading of Nietzsche’s use of rhetoric as inseparable from his philosophical project. I provide an exegesis of Nietzsche’s own reflections on rhetoric and attend to its actual deployment. In doing so, I highlight the underexplored themes of receptivity and dissonance. I challenge common interpretations by arguing that Nietzsche’s rhetoric is neither deployed as a means to get at some unitary whole, nor is it evidence of an embrace of indeterminism. Nor yet does its significance reside only in relation to Nietzsche’s perspectivism. Rather, Nietzsche’s rhetoric, I argue, is often deliberately dissonant and oriented toward facilitating receptive effects. The aim is to alter the conditions of possibility. I conclude by suggesting that Nietzsche’s rhetoric has implications for critical theory, shifting how we might view critical political engagement in the public sphere. 

    Simon Lambek
    Centre for Ethics & Department of Political Science
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Mar 6, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Vincent Chiao

    Predicting Proportionality: Algorithmic Decision-Making in Sentencing

    Sentencing in many jurisdictions remains quite discretionary, with significant variability in how judges approach otherwise similar cases, raising concerns of both arbitrariness and bias. This paper proposes systematizing judgments of proportionality in sentencing by means of an algorithm. The aim of such an algorithm would be to predict what a typical judge in that jurisdiction would regard as a proportionate sentence in a particular case. Notably, unlike most discussions of algorithmic decision-making in the criminal law, the objective of the algorithm would be on predicting the behavior of judges rather than defendants. I show that endorsing such an algorithm does not come at the cost of case-specific justice, that it is consistent with a highly particularistic account of moral judgment, and that it is attractive even despite pervasive uncertainty as to the point of punishment.

    Vincent Chiao
    Law & Criminology
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Mar 2, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Thilo Schaefer, Laneways of the Imagination, Sidewalks in the Cloud: The Importance of Utopia for City-Building
    Political philosophy David Estlund has remarked that political philosophy suffers from a case of “utopophobia” or “the unreasonable fear of utopianism.” This paper shows how two common critiques of utopia, one represented by the work of F.A. Hayek and Karl Popper and the other by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, are based on a misunderstanding of the concept. Furthermore, this paper goes on to demonstrate how utopianism is also implicit in the writings of these anti-utopian critics in several problematic ways. Following this analysis, this paper suggests that we can think about utopia in terms of a loose typology, evaluating any particular utopian vision on two dimensions: (1) its level of perfectionism compared to its openness to possibility and (2) the degree to which it is grounded in generally accepted empirical facts. Finally, this paper uses the City of Toronto’s laneway housing debate and the recent proposal from Google’s Sidewalk Labs to build a smart neighbourhood in the city to illustrate the need to explicitly discuss the utopian visions underpinning contemporary planning practices.
    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, Mar 1, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Critical Ethics
    Emily Baxter, We Are All Criminals

    We Are All Criminals looks at people with criminal histories but no record–people who have had the luxury to forget.

    Doctors and lawyers, social workers and students, retailers and retirees tell stories of crimes they got away with, and consider how different their lives would have been had they been caught.

    The stories are of youth, boredom, intoxication, and porta potties. They are about race, class, and privilege. They are humorous, humiliating, and humbling in turn.

    Through photography and storytelling, this project seeks to challenge society’s perception of what it means to be a criminal and how much weight a record should be given, when truly – we are all criminals.

    Emily Baxter
    Founder & Executive Director, We Are All Criminals

    Commentators:
    Shaunna Kelly
    Law Offices of Shaunna Kelly

    Paula Maurutto
    Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

    co-sponsor:

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 28, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics in the City
    The End of Public Works? The Politics of Infrastructure and the Quiet Decline of Local Democracy (Ethics in the City Series)

    Focusing on Sidewalk Toronto, the joint project of Waterfront Toronto and Google’s Sidewalk Labs, Mariana Valverde critically examines the evolution, via neoliberal privatization, from public works to public-private partnerships as modes of urban governance.

    Mariana Valverde
    Criminology & Sociolegal Studies

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 28, 2018
    C4E Flash Event, Ethics in the City
    Akwasi Owusu-Bempah, To Police and Be Policed: Multiple Perspectives on Racialized Law Enforcement in a Diverse and Changing City

    Despite official claims of tolerance and inclusion, Toronto’s Black population has a historically tenuous relationship with the city’s law enforcement agencies. This study addresses how distrust of the police and notions of Black criminality are mutually sustained and reproduced through police encounters with Black citizens. Prior research has documented the myriad ways in which the police serve to subjugate and control Black populations. Previous research has also highlighted the importance of fair treatment in shaping citizens’ perceptions of police (and state) legitimacy. Very little, however, has simultaneously incorporated the perspectives of those on both sides of “the thin blue line.” Utilizing a mixed-methods approach, this study draws on interview and survey data with police officers and civilians to untangle the intricate relationship between race, policing, citizenship and state authority. The findings illustrate that both police officers and Black citizens act in ways that run counter to their own interests during their often hostile and confrontational encounters. Such encounters contribute to the erosion of police legitimacy and to the criminalization of race/racialization of crime. The findings provide support for a methodological approach to the study of racial inequality that is attentive to the multiple perspectives of the actors involved.

    Akwasi Owusu-Bempah
    University of Toronto, Sociology

    02:15 PM - 03:45 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 28, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: John-Stewart Gordon

    Moral Experts vs. Ethical Theories

    The lively topic of whether moral expertise and moral experts exist has been vividly discussed in recent contributions in ethics and, particularly, in bioethics. I hold the view that moral expertise exists and that some moral philosophers can be considered as moral experts in the full sense, who have moral expertise, while most cannot. In this talk, however, I focus on the question of whether moral experts–by adhering to their particular expertise–are better qualified to solve complex moral questions than (moral) philosophers who (only) use a particular moral theory. This is an important issue because my analysis will respond to the vital question of whether one is, in general, able to solve complex moral issues by adhering to only one moral theory given the background of the complexity of moral life.

    John-Stewart Gordon
    Professor & Head of the Research Cluster for Applied Ethics
    Vytautas Magnus University Kaunas

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Feb 27, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: No No: A Dockumentary

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Feb 27, 2018
    Ethics at Noon, C4E Flash Event
    New Perspectives on Mass Incarceration in the United States
    The American incarceration rate has quintupled over the last generation, to the point where the United States now incarcerates over two million individuals. A wave of new empirical, sociological and legal scholarship has begun shed new light on the growth of mass incarceration. John Pfaff (Fordham) and Jonathan Simon (Berkeley) will discuss their groundbreaking research on the causes of mass incarceration, the response by the courts and proposals for reform going forward.

    Panelists:

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Feb 26, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics, Science|Ethics|Tech
    Perspectives on Ethics: Regina Rini

    Democracy and Social Media Are Incompatible: Now What?

    It takes time for the norms of democratic debate to adjust to new technologies – in some cases, too much time. In parts of Europe in the 1920s and 30s, change brought on by the new technology of radio outran democratic adaptation. I will argue that we are now at a similar inflection point with social media. Healthy democratic debate requires that we view fellow citizens as typically sincere and thoughtful when they express disagreement. I identify several features of social media discourse that have rapidly undermined this presumption and weakened the authority of democratic norms. What can be done about these shifts? I will argue that state and consumer solutions are unlikely to work. Our best hope is for social media platforms to create infrastructure enabling citizens to detect insincerity and carelessness in discourse.

    Regina Rini
    York University
    Philosophy

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Feb 20, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics in the City
    The Ethics of Smart Cities: Interacting with Non-Human Agents (Ethics in the City Series)

    In her book on Smart Technologies and the End(s) of LawMireille Hildebrandt sketches the contours of a new landscape, animated by all kinds of machine agency. She calls the fusion of online and offline worlds “the Onlife World,” highlighting that the boundaries between on- and offline are becoming increasingly artificial: we have to make them to retain some of our personal space. Being human in a hyperconnected world was the subtitle of the “Onlife Manifesto,” that was written by a group of European philosophers, neuroscientists, psychologists, lawyers and experts in artificial intelligence. In her lecture, Hildebrandt will employ the work of Julie Mehretu to discuss the impact of a transformed cityscape that confronts citizens with the effects of hyperconnectivity, big data and predictive analytics at the level of municipal policies. The question will be what kind of humans we may become when ‘living with algorithms’ is the new normal, and how we can learn to shape our algorithmic environment in the Onlife World without succumbing to idealistic or cynical portrayals of the upcoming smart cityscape. This talk will revisit a presentation Hildebrandt gave at art centre Stroom in The Hague.

    Mireille Hildebrandt
    Law and Technology, Vrije Universiteit Brussels
    Computing & Information Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Feb 16, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Cáit Power, The Jew in Speech: Conceiving the City, God, and Man 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, Feb 15, 2018
    Events on Campus
    Killam Lecture: Thomas Hurka

    University Professor Thomas Hurka, the Chancellor Henry N. R. Jackman Professor of Philosophical Studies, is the recipient of a 2017 Killam Prize in the Humanities, one of the most prestigious academic honours in Canada, granted for outstanding career achievement.

    Prof. Hurka will deliver a public lecture under the title of The Intrinsic Values of Knowledge and Achievement. The event is free and open to the public.

    Read more about Prof. Hurka’s monumental achievement, publications, and career on the U of T Arts & Science News website.

    hosted by:

    co-sponsored by:

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 100, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Wed, Feb 14, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics in the City
    Canadian Smart Cities: Defining the Public Good (Ethics in the City Series)

    From the federal government’s smart city challenge to Sidewalk Labs‘ partnering with Waterfront Toronto on the planning of Quayside, smart cities are part of a new urban agenda in Canadian cities. Their technology and data have clear value to the private sector but what do smart cities offer in terms of public good outcomes? This talk will explore how early experiments with smart cities send signals that deliberate and creative attention must be paid if we seek to derive public good from this technology.

    Pamela Robinson
    Associate Dean, Graduate Studies and Strategic Initiatives, Faculty of Community Services

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 14, 2018
    Author Meets Critics
    Author Meets Critics: Mara Marin

    Connected by Commitment: Oppression and Our Responsibility to Undermine It (Oxford 2017)

    Mara Marin
    Postdoctoral Affiliate, Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    Commentators:
    Shannon Dea
    (Philosophy, University of Waterloo)
    Kerry Rittich (Law, University of Toronto)
    Meredith Schwartz (Philosophy, Ryerson University)
    Torrey Shanks (Political Science, University of Toronto)

    Saying that political and social oppression is a deeply unjust and widespread condition of life is not a terribly controversial statement. Likewise, theorists of justice frequently consider our obligation to not turn a blind eye to oppression. But what is our culpability in the endurance of oppression?

    In this book, Mara Marin complicates the primary ways in which we make sense of human and political relationships and our obligations within them. Rather than thinking of relationships in terms of our intentions, Marin thinks of them as open-ended and subject to ongoing commitments. Commitments create open-ended expectations and vulnerabilities on the part of others, and therefore also obligations. By this rationale, our actions sustain oppressive or productive structures in virtue of their cumulative effects, not the intentions of the actors.When we violate our obligations we oppress others.

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Feb 13, 2018
    Science|Ethics|Tech, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics of AI Film Series
    Ethics of AI Film Series: Star Trek TNG

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Feb 13, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Richard Zemel, Ensuring Fair and Responsible Automated Decisions

    Information systems are becoming increasingly reliant on statistical inference and learning to render all sorts of decisions, including the issuing of bank loans, the targeting of advertising, and the provision of health care. This growing use of automated decision-making has sparked heated debate among philosophers, policy-makers, and lawyers, with critics voicing concerns with bias and discrimination. Bias against some specific groups may be ameliorated by attempting to make the automated decision-maker blind to some attributes, but this is difficult, as many attributes may be correlated with the particular one.  The basic aim then is to make fair decisions, i.e., ones that are not unduly biased for or against specific subgroups in the population. I will discuss various computational formulations and approaches to this problem.

    [☛ eVideo]

    Richard Zemel
    Computer Science & Vector Institute
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 7, 2018
    Conferences
    Conference: Collective and Temporally Extended Rights and Wrongs

    Collective and Temporally Extended Rights and Wrongs
    (A Halbert Network Workshop)

    Paradigmatic cases of moral obligations and wrongdoing involve a single act of an individual towards specific persons. However many cases of moral obligations and wrong do not have this structure. I can wrong a student by repeatedly failing to call on her in class, even if I am not obligated to call on her on any specific occasion. It seems also that we together can wrong others even though no individual act of any of us wrongs any specific other person. A similar structure presents itself in the theories of practical reason and collective rationality. Philosophers have examined the rational demands on behaviour that obtain in virtue of projects, plans, and commitments that extend through time. In the area of collective action, we may ask how my participation in a collective action contributes to the assessment of what is rational for me to do.

    Organizer:
    Sergio Tenenbaum
    Professor of Philosophy
    University of Toronto

    Schedule

    Tuesday, February 6 (Location: Jackman Humanities Building Rm. 418)
    2:45 – 4:15pm Haim Abraham (Toronto), Corrective Justice Duties for Belligerent Wrongs
    4:30 – 6:00pm Alon Harel (HUJI) & Ofer Malcai (HUJI), Vox Populi Vox Dei: Populism, Elitism and Private Reason

    Wednesday, February 7 (Location: Centre for Ethics, Larkin Building Rm. 200)
    9:15 – 10:45am Emma McClure (Toronto), Microaggressions as Collective Harms and Individual Wrongs
    11:00am – 12:30pm Daniel Attas (HUJI), Who Owns Cultural Heritage?
    Lunch
    2 – 3:30pm Julia Nefsky (Toronto), Global Warming, Individual Obligations and the Inefficacy Problem: the Need for an Imperfect View
    3:45 – 5:15pm Rona Dinur (HUJI), Intentional Discrimination

    co-sponsored by:

    09:15 AM - 05:15 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Feb 6, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Mireille Hildebrandt, The Ethics of Agonistic Machine Learning

    What do we mean when we say that machines learn? What is the difference that makes a difference between human learning and machine learning? In my talk I will discuss the nature of machine learning (ML), including a series of design decisions that inform ML research designs and the trade-offs they incorporate. I will argue that these trade-offs have real world implications that require the participation of those who will suffer or enjoy the consequences of real world ML applications. Building on Mouffe’s democratic theory and Rip’s constructive technology assessment, I will argue for agonistic or adversarial ML as the only viable way to ensure that ML contributes to human and societal flourishing.

    [☛ eVideo]

    Mireille Hildebrandt
    Law and Technology, Vrije Universiteit Brussels
    Computing & Information Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen
    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Feb 5, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Jennifer Carlson

    The Police Man’s Burden: Emotional Labor, Masculinity and the Ethics of Force

    Use of force is central to police work, yet the contours of the use of force for American police have changed dramatically in recent years. First, police have become increasingly prepared to use force due to changes in training and equipment amid threats of mass shootings, domestic terrorism, and so forth. Second, police are increasingly policing contexts that are gun-rich and gun law-lax, with over 13 million people licensed to carry guns in the US. Third, police have increasingly faced public outcry related to the use of force, especially with regard to racial disparities in excessive force. In what contexts do police embrace, versus accept or even avoid, the use of force? Is police use of force equally ‘non-negotiable’ (see Bittner, 1973) across social settings? If not, why not—and to what ends? To explore these questions, this talk draws on interviews with nearly 80 police chiefs across Arizona, California, and Michigan. While policing scholarship has documented how “hard charger” masculinist approaches to policing mediates the central role of firearms in constituting “real” policework (see Herbert, 2001), I draw on the concept of ‘moral wages’ (see Kolb, 2014) to show how guns operate not just as means of violence but also as gendered tools of emotional management. Examining how police evaluate more versus less moralistic uses of force and at times even opt out of force, I show that police make ethical sense of the use of force by framing it as masculine carework. Further situating these findings within the divergent contexts of Arizona, California and Michigan (especially their respective gun cultures) reveals that the boundaries between police and broader society are more porous than often acknowledged: police sensibilities about legitimate force are patterned by more localized norms regarding the use of force as well as by the socio-legal regimes in which police are embedded.

    Jennifer Carlson
    University of Arizona
    School of Sociology & School of Government and Public Policy

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Fri, Feb 2, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Chi Kwok, Personal Autonomy and Workplace Justice 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Jan 30, 2018
    Science|Ethics|Tech, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics of AI Film Series
    Ethics of AI Film Series: Blade Runner

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Jan 30, 2018
    Science|Ethics|Tech, Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Frank Rudzicz, The Future of Automated Healthcare

    As artificial intelligence and software tools for medical diagnosis are increasingly used within the healthcare system generally, it will be important that these tools are used ethically. This talk will cover recent advances in machine learning in healthcare, current approaches to ethics in healthcare, likely changes to regulation to allow for increased use of AI, and new challenges, both technical and societal, that will arise given those changes.

    [☛ eVideo]

    Frank Rudzicz
    University Health Network & Computer Science
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Jan 29, 2018
    C4E Flash Event
    Flash Event: The Quebec City Mosque Shooting: What Have We Learned?

    On the evening of January 29, 2017, a University of Laval student entered a mosque in Quebec City after evening prayers, opening fire on the worshippers. In the end, he killed six, and wounded nineteen others. Although motivated by anti-Muslim animus, he was not charged with terrorism, but rather with first-degree murder. The massacre should have reminded Canadians that the election of Justin Trudeau did not usher in a new feel good era that spelled the end of anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim animus in Canada.

    One year later, what has Canada learned from this attack? Did it learn anything, or has it been forgotten or minimized in an attempt to preserve a complacent view of Canada as a successful, multicultural state that has successfully integrated immigrants without triggering the rise of right-wing, xenophobic nationalism, as has occurred in the United States and elsewhere, including in Europe?

    Panelists:

    Christopher Cochrane
    Political Science, University of Toronto

    Mohammad Fadel
    Law, University of Toronto

    Jasmin Zine
    Sociology, Wilfrid Laurier University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Jan 24, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics in the City
    Sidewalk Toronto: Ethics in the "Smart City" (Ethics in the City Series)

    Join us for the kick-off event in our new series on Ethics in the City: a panel discussion of the Sidewalk Toronto Project, a collaboration of Google’s Sidewalk Labs and Waterfront Toronto.

    Panelists:

    Mark Fox
    Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto

    Ruben Gaetani
    Management, University of Toronto

    John Lorinc
    spacing.ca

    Mariana Valverde
    Criminology & Sociolegal Studies, University of Toronto

    Kristina Verner
    Waterfront Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Jan 24, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Richard Moon

    Ktunaxa Nation v. BC and the Shape of Religious Freedom 

    The main criticism of the recent Supreme Court of Canada decision in Ktunaxa is that the court in its s. 2(a) (freedom of religion) analysis relies on a “Protestant” or “Christian” conception of religion – that focuses on personal belief rather than collective practice or shared ways of living. I will argue, however, that this criticism of the court’s approach to s. 2(a) fails to understand the practical limits of religious freedom in a spiritually and culturally diverse political community.

    Richard Moon
    Professor of Law
    University of Windsor

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Jan 19, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Constantine Vassiliou, Montesquieu and Hume's English Affinities: The Nature of Honour and Its Function in Polite Commercial Society 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Jan 17, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Audrey Macklin
    Resettler Society: Private Refugee Sponsorship and Citizenship 

    How does the project of making refugees into citizens remake the citizenship of those who undertake it? That question animates an empirical research project focused on private refugee  sponsors. I will introduce the conceptual framework that structures the inquiry, and consider (provisionally) cosmopolitanism as motive for sponsorship, privatization as mode, and citizenship as effect.

    Audrey Macklin
    Director, Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
    Professor of Law and Chair in Human Rights
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Jan 16, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Timbuktu

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Jan 15, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics, Understanding Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Joshua Knobe

    Norms and Normality

    People ordinarily distinguish between ways of behaving that are “normal” and those that are “abnormal.” But how exactly is this distinction to be understood? This talk will discuss a series of experimental studies designed to explore people’s ordinary notion of normality. The key result is that people’s ordinary notion of normality is not a purely statistical one (e.g., the type of behavior that is most frequent) or a purely prescriptive one (e.g., the type of behavior that is ideal) but rather one that mixes together statistical and prescriptive considerations. I discuss implications of these findings for ethics and for research in cognitive science.

    Joshua Knobe
    Yale University
    Program in Cognitive Science &
    Department of Philosophy

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Dec 7, 2017
    Ethics & the Arts
    Music Amidst Violence: A Discussion Forum

    Recent decades have witnessed a growing impetus to perform music invoking past violence or troubled historical contexts: music composed under oppression or in exile, songs sung by sufferers and survivors of trauma. Such performances bear witness to the past, recognize that trauma occurred, memorialize loss and celebrate survival. They may inspire reflection or engender empathy among listeners.

    Is this music’s ethical dimension? Or does the immediacy of musical experience argue against its re-performance: does it not merely remember but re-activate violent histories? Are there some sonic artifacts that should not be re-sounded –– might silence be a better means toward reconciliation with the troubled past?

    Join us for a roundtable-forum integrating performance with scholarly discussion and critical reflection on the challenges of musical rendition as historical recovery and traumatic reconciliation.

    Eventbrite - Music Amidst Violence: A Discussion Forum

    Participants:

    • Michael Beckerman (Musicology, New York University) is an eminent scholar of Central and Eastern European music of the 19C and 20C, Jewish music, music in contexts of war, and music in the concentration camps.
    • Anna Shternshis (Director, Centre for Jewish Studies, University of Toronto) is an expert on Jewish culture in the Soviet Union.
    • Joshua Pilzer (Ethnomusicology, University of Toronto) specializes in the relationships between music, survival, memory, and traumatic experience, with a focus on the anthropology of music in modern Korea and Japan.
    • Adi Braun (singer-songwriter, Toronto) and Linda Ippolito (Sheridan, Ippolito & Associates, Toronto) have been researching the music and performers of the politically progressive Weimar-era cabaret for Braun’s new album Moderne Frau (2017).
    • Dobrochna Zubek (cello, Toronto) is an award-winning Polish musician whose multifaceted international career encompasses solo, chamber, orchestral and interdisciplinary performance.

    Hosted by:

    11:00 AM - 01:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Dec 6, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics, Critical Ethics
    James Forman Jr., Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America

    In recent years, America’s criminal justice system has become the subject of an increasingly urgent debate. Critics have assailed the rise of mass incarceration, emphasizing its disproportionate impact on people of color. As James Forman, Jr., points out, however, the war on crime that began in the 1970s was supported by many African American leaders in the nation’s urban centers. In Locking Up Our Own (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2017)he seeks to understand why.

    New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice/
    Washington Post Best-Seller

    Eventbrite - James Forman Jr., Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America

    James Forman Jr.
    Professor of Law
    Yale Law School

    Commentator:
    Teddy Harrison
    Political Science & Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    co-sponsored by:

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Dec 5, 2017
    Science|Ethics|Tech, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics of AI Film Series
    Ethics of AI Film Series: 2001: A Space Odyssey

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Dec 5, 2017

    Ethics & Film: Iron Eaters

    Unfortunately, this event had to be cancelled. Another film event has been scheduled in its place: see here.

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Dec 5, 2017
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Molly Sauter, Algorithmic Ethics and Personhood

    As “big data”-based predictive algorithms and generative models become commonplace tools of advertising, design, user research, and even political polling, are these modes of constructing machine-readable models of individuals displacing humans from our world? Are we allowing the messy, unpredictable, illegible aspects of being human to be overwritten by demands we remain legible to AI and machine learning systems intended to predict our actions, model our behavior, and sell us something? In this talk, technology scholar Molly Sauter looks at how currently deployed modeling systems constitute an attack on personhood and self determination, particularly in their use in politics and elections. Sauter posits that the use of “big data” in politics strips its targets of subjectivity, turning individuals into ready-to-read “data objects,” and making it easier for those in positions of power to justify aggressive manipulation and invasive inference. They further suggest that when big data methodology is used in the public sphere, it is reasonable for these “data objects” to, in turn, use tactics like obfuscation, up to the point of actively sabotaging the efficacy of the methodology in general, to resist attempts to be read, known, and manipulated.

    [☛ eVideo]

    Molly Sauter
    Communication Studies

    McGill University

    Eventbrite - Ethics of AI: Algorithmic Ethics and Personhood (w/ Molly Sauter)

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Dec 1, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Danny Hutton Ferris, Three Theories of Political Representation 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Dec 1, 2017
    C4E Flash Event, Science|Ethics|Tech, Undergraduate
    Doxxing and Hacker Ethics

    01:15 PM - 03:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Nov 22, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Antje du Bois-Pedain

    Punishment and the Passage of Time

    Many (if not most) legal systems make the prosecution of crimes subject to certain time limits, calculated from the time of the commission of the offence. Such criminal statutes of limitation frequently create an absolute barrier to prosecution, even when the available evidence is good, the defence would not be unduly disadvantaged by the lapse of time, and the prosecution is not to be blamed for any delay. This presentation asks whether there are sound reasons to restrict the state’s ability to prosecute crimes through prescription. While my normative arguments are set in a context of a censuring conception of state punishment, I am concerned also to show how institutional concerns affect the legitimacy of prescription.

    Eventbrite - Antje du Bois-Pedain: Punishment and the Passage of Time

    Antje du Bois-Pedain
    Senior Lecturer
    Faculty of Law
    Cambridge University

    11:30 AM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Nov 21, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: The White Ribbon

     

    Eventbrite - Ethics & Film: The White Ribbon

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Nov 20, 2017
    Critical Ethics
    The Ethics of Food

    Food, and food choices, are complex. In what ways have ethical perspectives been brought to bear on various aspects of food production, consumption, and disposal? This panel will articulate social and cultural determinants of food systems, as well as explore and illuminate the origins of various moral questions about food.

    Eventbrite - The Ethics of Food

    Matthew Feinberg
    Rotman School of Management

    Stephen Scharper
    School of the Environment & Department of Anthropology

    Tammara Soma
    Food Systems Lab

     

    02:00 PM - 04:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Nov 15, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Emily Nacol, The Politics of Contagion: Immunity and Community in Modern Plague Narratives 04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Room 3130, Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George St.

  • Mon, Nov 13, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Sophia Vasalou
    Approaching the Virtues in the Islamic Tradition

    Over the last few decades, there has been a dramatic surge of interest in moral character and the virtues among philosophers and psychologists. This has led to a fresh concern to explore the different ways in which the virtues have been approached historically, not only in philosophical but also in religious contexts. In this talk, my aim is to reflect on—and open a discussion of—the place of the virtues in the Islamic tradition. Within this tradition, there were several genres of ethical writing that we might identify as having hosted an engagement with the virtues. These include works of philosophical ethics, Sufi treatises, works of literature (adab), and mirrors for princes. Yet just how comfortably can we indeed identify the moral concepts that govern these works with the virtues, as these are often understood? How seriously do these works take what we would call character? Using the philosophical tradition as my foil—including the work of the well-known ethicist Abū ʿAlī Miskawayh—I will tackle these questions by focusing on the eminent 11th-century theologian Abū Ḥāmid al-Ghazālī. In the Revival of the Religious Sciences, al-Ghazālī drew on Sufi and philosophical ideas to articulate a vision of the ethical and spiritual life that pivoted on the realisation of certain kinds of valued internal states. In true eudaimonist style, these states are viewed as playing an indispensable role in the achievement of happiness. Yet is al-Ghazālī talking about the virtues? Just how robust is the concept of character at work in his thinking? And what does this have to tell us about the prospects of locating the virtues within the Islamic tradition more broadly?

    Eventbrite - Sophia Vasalou: Approaching the Virtues in the Islamic Tradition

    Sophia Vasalou
    Library of Arabic Literature Fellow
    Department of Theology and Religion
    University of Birmingham
    04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Nov 7, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Roger & Me

     

    Eventbrite - Ethics & Film: Roger & Me

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Nov 7, 2017
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Hector Levesque, Rethinking the Place of Thinking in Intelligent Behaviour

    It seems clear that in people, ordinary commonsense thinking is an essential
    part of acting intelligently.  Yet the most popular current approach to
    Artificial Intelligence downplays this thinking aspect and emphasizes learning
    from massive amounts of data instead.  This talk goes over these notions and
    attempts to make the case that computers systems based even on extensive
    learning alone might have serious dangers that are not immediately obvious.

    [☛ eVideo]

    Eventbrite - Ethics of AI: Rethinking the Place of Thinking in Intelligent Behaviour (w/ Hector Levesque)

    Hector Levesque
    Computer Science
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Nov 6, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Valsamis Mitsilegas

    The Ethos of European Criminal Law

    The development of EU powers in the field of criminal law has been, and remains to date, a contested enterprise from the perspective of both state sovereignty and the protection of fundamental rights. In looking at the Ethos of European Criminal Law, the presentation will cast light on the main challenges underpinning the evolution of European Criminal Law by examining closely four fundamental questions:  the ‘why’ question (why has supranational integration in the field evolved and what are the main legal interests upheld by Europeanisation); the ‘how’ question (how has Europeanisation occurred and what are the forms of governance in European criminal law); the ‘what’ question (what is the content of European criminal law); and the ‘for whom’ question (who is European Criminal Law entitled to address and/or protect). Answers to these questions will lead to an analysis of the Ethos of European Criminal Law placed within the broader EU and domestic constitutional context.

    Eventbrite - Valsamis Mitsilegas: The Ethos of European Criminal Law

    Valsamis Mitsilegas
    Queen Mary University of London
    Professor of European Criminal Law, Head of the Department of Law and Dean for Research (Humanities and Social Sciences)

     


     

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Nov 3, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Simon Lambek, Theorizing Rhetorical Democracy: World-Building and Critique 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Nov 1, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Amber Riaz

    Moral Learning and Experience

    Many philosophers think that although experience sometimes plays a crucial role in putting one in a position to attain moral knowledge, moral knowledge is not empirical knowledge. In a recent paper defending this Orthodox View (“Moral Knowledge and Experience”), Sarah McGrath argues that at best experience can play an enabling, triggering and sensitizing role in the acquisition of moral knowledge, but that it neither gives moral knowledge, nor provides evidence for it. In this talk, I will consider and reject some arguments for the Orthodox View. In addition, I will provide an alternative account according to which there is at least some moral learning by experience, and experience provides an important evidential role in the acquisition of moral knowledge.

    Eventbrite - Amber Riaz: Moral Learning and Experience

    Amber Riaz
    Assistant Professor

    Department of Humanities & Social Sciences
    LUMS (Lahore University of Management Sciences)

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Oct 27, 2017
    Conferences
    Conference: Judgement, Relationality, Care: A Celebration of the Work of Jennifer Nedelsky


    This is a symposium devoted to a discussion of the work of Jennifer Nedelsky. It will begin with introductory reflections on Jenny’s first book devoted to the theme of property and American Constitutionalism and then proceed with three panels each devoted to an important theme of Jenny’s subsequent work: political judgement, law’s relations and work-care relations.

    Eventbrite - Judgement, Relationality, Care: A Celebration of the Work of Jennifer Nedelsky

    Schedule:

    10:45-11:00
    Coffee and iIntroductory Remarks by Peggy Kohn (University of Toronto)

    11:00-11:15
    Jennifer Nedelsky (University of Toronto): Reflections on My Work So Far

    11:15-12:00
    Joan Tronto (University of Minnesota): A Retrospective on Nedelsky’s Work

    12:00-12:20
    Discussion on Nedelsky and Tronto

    12:20-1:15
    Lunch

    1:15-2:30 Political Judgement
    Melissa Williams (University of Toronto), Torrey Shanks (University of Toronto), Anna Drake (University of Waterloo)

    2:30-3:45 Law’s Relations
    Rebecca Kingston (University of Toronto), Mara Marin (University of Toronto Centre for Ethics), Christine Sypnowich (Queen’s University)

    3:45-4:00
    Coffee

    4:00-5:15 Work-Care Relations
    Tom Malleson (University of Western Ontario), Kerry Rittich (University of Toronto), Rachael Desborough (University of Toronto)

    co-sponsored by:

     

    10:30 AM - 05:15 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, Oct 26, 2017
    Author Meets Critics
    Author Meets Critics: Alan Brudner

    The Owl and the Rooster: Hegel’s Transformative Political Science (Cambridge 2017)

    Alan Brudner
    Albert Abel Professor of Law Emeritus
    University of Toronto

    Since 1945, there have been two waves of Anglo-American writing on Hegel’s political thought. The first defended it against works portraying Hegel as an apologist of Prussian reaction and a theorist of totalitarian nationalism. The second presented Hegel as a civic humanist critic of liberalism in the tradition of Rousseau. The first suppressed elements of Hegel’s thought that challenge liberalism’s individualistic premises; the second downplayed Hegel’s theism. This book recovers what was lost in each wave. It restores aspects of Hegel’s political thought unsettling to liberal beliefs, yet that lead to a state more liberal than Locke’s and Kant’s, which retain authoritarian elements. It also scrutinizes Hegel’s claim to have justified theism to rational insight, hence to have made it conformable to Enlightenment standards of admissible public discourse. And it seeks to show how, for Hegel, the wholeness unique to divinity is realizable among humans without concession or compromise and what role philosophy must play in its final achievement. Lastly, we are shown what form Hegel’s philosophy can take in a world not yet prepared for his science. Here is Hegel’s political thought undistorted.

    hosted by:

    co-sponsored by:

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Faculty of Law, Conference Centre
    78 Queen's Park

  • Thu, Oct 26, 2017
    Ethics at Noon, Professing Ethics
    Ethics@Noon: Sunit Das

    Medical, Legal and Ethical Definitions of Futility

    What is medical futility? How do we define it? How does uncertainty about the meaning of what is futile direct us in the practical work of patient care? And how do we reconcile these questions with legal understandings of medical futility?

    In this seminar, we will attempt to address these concerns through an exploration of both conceptual and practical issues of the ethics of medical futility.

    Dr. Sunit Das
    Division of Neurosurgery
    University of Toronto

    Eventbrite - Dr. Sunit Das: Medical, Legal and Ethical Definitions of Futility

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Oct 24, 2017
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI: Brian Cantwell Smith, Reckoning and Judgment

    All we are likely to build, based on anything we currently understand, are systems that reckon.  Ethical deliberation, as opposed to ethical consequence, requires full scale judgment, which goes quite a bit beyond such reckoning powers.

    [☛ eVideo]

    Brian Cantwell Smith
    iSchool & Philosophy
    University of Toronto

    Eventbrite - Ethics of AI: Reckoning and Judgment (w/ Brian Cantwell Smith)

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Oct 23, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: George Pavlakos

    A Plea for Moderate Optimisation: On the Structure of Constitutional Principles as Interpersonal Reasons

    In this talk I will make a modest effort to overcome the dichotomy between a teleological and deontological understanding of constitutional rights, which I argue underpins the debate on the principle of proportionality in constitutional law. In an opening part I will introduce a standard account of constitutional principles as optimization requirements, which has come to be known as Theory of Principles [Prinzipientheorie], and then draw a distinction between a demanding and a moderate conception of optimisation. I will suggest that while the demanding conception is incompatible with the deontological character of rights, it is also one that does not find strong support in the standard account. Conversely the standard account lends support to a moderate conception of optimisation, which may be rendered compatible with the deontological character of constitutional rights. Whether it can be thus rendered, depends on the possibility of reconciling deontological with other impersonal (teleological) reasons, which I set out to explore in the third part of the talk. There I discuss the familiar distinction between agent-neutral and agent-relative reasons with an eye to demonstrating that no sharp separation can be maintained between these two conceptions of reasons, at least not in the Kantian framework within which the standard account of Theory of Principles operates.

    In concluding, I will suggest out that a relaxation of the tension between agent-neutral and agent-relative reasons can contribute to a better understanding of the claim that legal principles aim at optimisation. A notable consequence is that proportionality control is better understood in terms of determination of abstract normative reasons (principles) than in terms of balancing between disparate or conflicting standards.

    George Pavlakos
    School of Law
    University of Glasgow

    Eventbrite - A Plea for Moderate Optimisation

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 20, 2017
    Public Lectures
    Nick Smith, Apologies as Remedies/Apologies as Weapons

    Apologies as Remedies/Apologies as Weapons

    A C4E Public Lecture by

    Nick Smith
    Professor of Philosophy & Department Chair
    University of New Hampshire

    Apologies pervade our news headlines and our private affairs, but how should we evaluate these complex rituals? An apology can save a marriage, salvage a career, reduce settlement damages by millions, shave years off of criminal sentences, or even prevent a war. Whether from a child nudged to apologize to a sibling or an offender expressing remorse in hopes of avoiding execution, expressions of contrition can convey meaning across many different kinds of value and we suffer from considerable confusion about the moral meanings and social functions of these interactions.

    Beyond apologies from individuals, collective apologies add layers of intricacy and policy implications. If an executive publicly apologizes for a faulty product while corporate counsel simultaneously denies wrongdoing and obscures personal responsibility of anyone in the organization, how does this correspond to common expectations that accepting blame and changing behavior are cornerstones of good apologies? If a head of state draws attention to and apologizes for the offenses of a previous administration and provides only symbolic redress, how should we understand the value of such political theater?

    Eventbrite - Apologies as Remedies/Apologies as Weapons (w/ Nick Smith)

    co-sponsor:

    03:30 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 100, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Fri, Oct 20, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Daniel Sherwin, Comparative Political Theory in Canada: Engaging Indigenous Resurgence 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 3130, Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George St.

  • Fri, Oct 20, 2017
    Conferences
    Conference: The Ethics of Apology: Interdisciplinary & International Perspectives

    Today, apologies seem to be everywhere. Individuals apologize, offenders, doctors, lawyers, as do corporations, organizations, universities, police departments, cities, countries, and governments. We crave apologies, we seek and demand them, insisting that we “deserve” them. And sometimes, but not always, we “get” an apology, or at least we get a promise to get one later.

    Apologies may be ubiquitous, and yet they remain little understood. This workshop will consider questions such as: Why do we seek apologies? And why do we give them? How do they work (if they work)? What do apologies do? What do they mean, in different contexts, at different times, to different people? What makes a good apology, an effective one, a sincere or genuine or heartfelt one? What distinguishes apologies from apparent social, legal, rhetorical, or communicative alternatives like expressions of regret or sympathy and acknowledgments of fault, of responsibility, or of guilt? In general, is there an ethics of apology, a set of substantive and procedural norms that govern their performance, interpretation, and implementation in various cultural and historical settings?

    On the occasion of Canada’s 150th birthday, the proposed workshop sets out to explore the modern—or perhaps not-so-modern—phenomenon of the apology and its place in the ethos of contemporary Canadian society and politics. We will focus on certain apologetic moments in Canadian political life, placing them in a broad interdisciplinary and comparative context; these include, for instance, the various apologies offered for state wrongs committed against indigenous people over the past 150 years of Canadian history and, most recently, the demand that the federal government issue an official apology for “state sponsored discrimination against Canada’s LGBTQ2SI communities” (EGALE 2016), in contrast to remedies for unjust government actions offered elsewhere (expungement or pardon of convictions in the UK and Australia, compensation in Germany). It is one thing to regard an official apology as an acceptable symbolic alternative to an elusive concrete and enforceable legal remedy. Under what circumstances might an apology be regarded not as merely acceptable, but as preferable?

    To shed light on the ubiquitous yet still mysterious, and mysteriously powerful, phenomenon of the apology through open debate across modes and subjects of inquiry, this workshop brings together an interdisciplinary and international group of scholars, students, and activists at the Centre for Ethics, the University of Toronto’s interdisciplinary centre aimed at advancing research and teaching in the field of ethics, broadly defined. The results of this exercise in communal critical analysis will be widely shared beyond the walls of the university through dissemination on the Centre’s online open-access journal and YouTube channel, with the aim of stimulating and facilitating public debate about the role and continued salience of apologies in contemporary social, political, and ethical discourse, in Canada and beyond.

    Participants:
    Doug Elliott (Cambridge LLP, Toronto), “So Sorry: The Legal Myths and Social Realities of the Official Apology”
    Teddy Harrison (University of Toronto, Political Science), “Apologies and Violence in Criminal Justice”
    Cindy Holder (University of Victoria, Philosophy), “Whose Wrong Is It Anyway? Reflecting on the Public-ness of Public Apologies”
    Matt James & Jordan Stanger-Ross (University of Victoria, Political Science & History), “Impermanent Apologies: On the Dynamics of Timing and Public Knowledge in Political Apology”
    Patrick Keilty (University of Toronto, Faculty of Information), “Sorry/Not Sorry: Sexual Regulation and Apology at the Toronto Police Service”
    Mark Kingwell (University of Toronto, Philosophy), “Apologies: A Stylistic Investigation”
    Daryl Koehn (DePaul University, Philosophy), “The Business Ethics of CEO Apologies”
    Nico Lacetera (University of Toronto, Management), “Corporate Apologies and the Ethics of Trust”
    Steven Maynard (Queen’s University, History), “Sorry Seems to be the Easiest Word: The Gay Pardon in Canada and the ‘Rehabilitation’ of Queer History”
    John Ricco (University of Toronto, Art History), “On Queer Forgiveness”
    Mayana Slobodian (University of Toronto, Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies), “Finding Canada’s Official Apology at the Truth & Reconciliation Commission”
    Nick Smith (University of New Hampshire, Philosophy), “Apologies as Remedies/Apologies as Weapons” (Keynote: Please register separately here.)
    Simon Stern (University of Toronto, Law & English), “Atonement, Closure, and Narrative”

    Schedule (subject to change):
    ☛ Friday 20 October, 2017
    8:45 a.m. Welcome
    9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Doug Elliott, Patrick Keilty, John Ricco, Steven Maynard
    11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Matt James & Jordan Stanger-Ross, Mayana Slobodian
    1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Cindy Holder, Mark Kingwell, Simon Stern
    3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Nick Smith (Keynote Lecture) (Rm 100, Jackman Humanities Building; separate registration)
    ☛ Saturday 21 October, 2017
    9:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. Nick Smith, Teddy Harrison, Daryl Koehn, Nico Lacetera

     

    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, Oct 19, 2017
    Events on Campus
    Radical Black Political Thought in the 20th and 21st Centuries

    Working with and through a black radical/critical intellectual and political tradition, this talk–hosted by the Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education–will map another genealogy of critical theory which posits that the central issues of our time are our modes of production of the human and freedom. It will argue that contemporary black radical political thought (including the contributions of WEB DuBois, Sylvia Wynter, Frantz Fanon and Aimé Césaire) opens up spaces for the reframing of current critical theory.

    Speaker:
    Professor Anthony Bogues, Asa Messer Professor of Humanities and Critical Theory, Professor of Africana Studies & Director of the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice (CSSJ), Brown University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
    252 Bloor Street West

  • Wed, Oct 18, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Lucia Zedner

    Policing Civility in Public Space: Civil Orders and Uncivil Practices

    Public policing is increasingly sidelined by the rise of publicly owned private spaces, private security and the proliferation of alternate civil and regulatory measures. This paper examines a raft of civil measures introduced in the UK to police those whose presence is deemed inimical to a contrived idea of public civility. One particularly egregious example are Public Spaces Protection Orders, which allow officials to impose infinite restrictions and exclusions upon those whose conduct has, or might in future have, a ‘detrimental effect on the quality of life of those in the locality’. The paper considers their implications for justice, for those ‘uncivil’ citizens subjected to their prohibitions, and for participation in public life. It suggests that such disciplinary measures erode the very safeguards by which citizens are – or should be – protected against the unwarranted exercise of state coercive power. Targeting the poor, the homeless, the young, and marginalized, orders that seek to manufacture the appearance of civility arguably do little more than cosmetically conceal the underlying injustices of modern urban life.

    Lucia Zedner
    Faculty of Law & All Souls College
    Oxford University

    Eventbrite - Lucia Zedner: Policing Civility in Public Space: Civil Orders and Uncivil Practices

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Oct 17, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Tangerine

     

    Eventbrite - Ethics & Film: Tangerine

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Oct 17, 2017
    Professing Ethics, Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI: Sunit Das, AI in Medicine: Hopes? Nightmares?

    Artificial intelligence promises to change the practice of medicine, from identifying early radiographic signs of stroke to determining the most appropriate second line chemotherapeutic agent for a patient with cancer. But many of the questions around AI involving transparency, judgment, and responsibility are at the very core of the compact that grounds the place of medicine and the identity of persons in our society. In this seminar, we will explore some of the promise offered by AI to the practice of medicine, while considering the profound ethical questions raised by that promise.

    [☛ eVideo]

    Dr. Sunit Das
    Division of Neurosurgery
    University of Toronto

    Eventbrite - Ethics of AI: AI in Medicine: Hopes? Nightmares? (w/ Dr. Sunit Das)

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Oct 11, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: François du Bois

    Corrective Justice and Deterrence: A Partial Reconciliation?

    This talk will subject the two dominant theoretical accounts of private law to a critical assessment proceeding from the fundamental commitment of a liberal legal order to treating persons as ethically reasoning agents. The conclusions reached will then be used to explain why private law in many jurisdictions (not least Canada) fails to conform fully to the ideals articulated by either account but exhibits features of both corrective justice and deterrence.

    François du Bois
    Professor
    Leicester Law School

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Oct 3, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Weiner

     

     

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Sep 29, 2017
    Public Lectures
    Sheila Jasanoff, Ethical Futures: Imagination and Governance in an Unequal World

    Ethical Futures: Imagination and Governance in an Unequal World

    A C4E Public Lecture by

    Sheila Jasanoff
    Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies
    Director, Program on Science, Technology and Society
    Harvard Kennedy School

    Can we responsibly design a future that does not connect to its pasts?  Can we govern a future that we cannot imagine?  As technology becomes the most powerful instrument for shaping the human future, these questions have assumed greater importance for moral engagement and analysis.  Using examples such as nuclear risk, assisted reproduction, and agricultural biotechnology, I will show that choices of how to live with technology are shaped and constrained by prior, institutionalized visions of the public good.  New and emerging technologies, reflecting longstanding socioeconomic disparities among human societies, threaten to override such cross-cultural variations in moral imagination and associated norms of democratic self-governance.  How should global societies respond to that challenge?  Contemporary debates around gene editing, especially of the human germline, offer an opportunity for further reflection on this point.

    Eventbrite - Ethical Futures: Imagination and Governance in an Unequal World (w/ Sheila Jasanoff)

    co-sponsored by:


     

     

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Sep 29, 2017

    Master Class: Sheila Jasanoff, Post-Modern Democracy: Truth and Trust in the Public Sphere

    Post-Modern Democracy: Truth and Trust in the Public Sphere

    Even before Donald Trump was elected president of the United States in 2016, political commentators began expressing concerns about the decay of truthfulness in the public sphere. How, they asked, could any form of political legitimacy be maintained in a world where there were no agreed upon facts. Among the responses to this dilemma, one that has found widespread favor among liberals and progressives is that scientific consensus must be respected and held apart from politics. In a democracy, so the truism goes, people are entitled to their own opinions but not to their own facts. This analysis, however, is flawed. It is both ahistorical and asymmetrical in relegating public facts to a position outside of politics and society, a move that denies the contingent, constructed, and culturally situated character of truth in the public sphere. This presentation will propose an alternative view based on findings from Science and Technology Studies. The common misconception that recognizing the contingency of facts is equivalent to radical relativism will be discussed and set aside.

    Please note: This Master Class is open to graduate students at the University of Toronto. If you’re interested in attending, please contact ethics@utoronto.ca. Space is limited and registration is required.

    Sheila Jasanoff
    Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies

    Director, Program on Science, Technology and Society
    Harvard Kennedy School

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Sep 27, 2017
    Ethics at Noon, Ethics & the Arts
    Ethics@Noon: Eva-Lynn Jagoe

    The Ethics of the Individual

    [☛ eVideo]

    This discussion will revolve around the disjuncture between the ethical stance of the individual and the structures of late capitalism. What beliefs and stories do we tell ourselves about our own personal decisions and our responsibilities in the face of the challenges that our society faces as we move into an uncertain future?

    Eva-Lynn Jagoe
    Professor of Comparative Literature & Spanish and Portuguese
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Sep 25, 2017
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI: Mark Kingwell, Respect and the Artificial Other

    What role do personhood, respect, tolerance, and sympathy play in our relations to future AI developments? Do other concepts familiar from political-theoretic likewise apply, and if so, how? In this talk I will sketch some ideas for how to think productively about human-AI relations as their complexity advances in both the short- and long-term.

    [☛ eVideo]

    Mark Kingwell
    Department of Philosophy
    University of Toronto

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Sep 22, 2017
    Conferences
    Conference: The Limits and Legitimacy of Referenda

    The Limits and Legitimacy of Referenda

    Writing shortly after the Brexit vote, Kenneth Rogoff decried the use of referenda in modern constitutional democracy: “This isn’t democracy; it is Russian roulette for republics.” Beyond Brexit, many recent majoritarian decisions have concerned matters of real constitutional importance, in Colombia, Hungary, Italy, Crimea, Turkey and Thailand, for example. Referenda are sometimes exalted as the closest we can come to the exercise of popular sovereignty, but few of the world’s most influential constitutions have been ratified by a referendum. On the other hand, some of the referenda we have witnessed recently have not sought to change the formal or written constitution, but nevertheless engage questions of fundamental constitutional significance and national identity. A number of questions follow for scholars and students of public law:

    • Has the referendum emerged as a mechanism for effecting change to the fundamental structure of a political community without amending the constitution?
    • What is it about the referendum that explains why some notable constitution-making processes and the constitutional amendment procedures of influential constitutions avoid it, while change-makers at this sub-constitutional level embrace it?
    • Do referenda raise different questions in constitution-making versus constitution-changing or fundamental political change?
    • Under which conditions should referenda be used in making and changing constitutions?
    • Are referenda most appropriate for largely homogenous jurisdictions, and to be avoided in heterogeneous ones; or does the promise of referenda lie in their capacity to bridge and indeed to transcend differences, be they ethnic, ideological, geographic or otherwise?

    This symposium seeks answers to these and related questions, bringing scholars from around the world to Toronto for two days of discussion, with proceedings to be published in a special issue of the University of Toronto Law Journal. Scholars presenting papers for discussion at the symposium include:

    • Antoni Abat Ninet, Law (Copenhagen)
    • Richard Albert, Law (BC/Texas)
    • Carlos Bernal, Law and Philosophy (Constitutional Court of Colombia)
    • Zachary Elkins, Political Science (Texas)
    • Mattias Kumm, Law (NYU and Humboldt)
    • Janna Promislow, Law (Thompson Rivers)
    • Richard Stacey, Law (Toronto)
    • Stephen Tierney, Law (Edinburgh)

    Discussants include:

    • Jacques Bertrand (Toronto)
    • Jamie Cameron (Osgoode)
    • Yasmin Dawood (Toronto)
    • David Dyzenhaus (Toronto)
    • Ran Hirschl (Toronto)
    • Courtney Jung (Toronto)
    • Neil Nevitte (Toronto)
    • David Schneiderman (Toronto)

    A limited number of seats are open to faculty and graduate students with research interests on the subject of the symposium. To register your interest in attending this program, please click here to complete the form.

    Friday, September 22, 2017 – 8:00am to Saturday, September 23, 2017 – 12:45pm
    hosted by:
    08:00 AM - 12:45 PM
    Faculty of Law, Conference Centre
    78 Queen's Park

  • Wed, Sep 20, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Guy Kahane

    Runaway Trolleys or Distant Strangers? How (and How Not) to Study the Psychology of Utilitarianism

    Recent work in moral psychology has been heavily influenced by three assumptions: (1) that we can directly map notions and distinctions from ethical theory onto everyday moral psychology; (2) that in this way, we can directly uncover the psychological roots of ethical theories; and finally (3) that this allows us to directly debunk or vindicate such theories. Greene’s work on trolley dilemmas is perhaps the most ambitious example of these assumptions at work. Alas, the relation between ethical theory and the psychology of morals is not that simple. Many have criticized (3) and (2). Here, I will instead largely criticize the first assumption, which is arguably more fundamental. Focusing on the case of utilitarian judgment, I’ll show that a great deal of current research deploys this philosophical notion in a manner that is both simplistic and unhelpful. I will outline a more nuanced framework for thinking about the relation between theories like utilitarianism and ordinary psychology, and report new empirical findings utilizing this framework. These findings strongly suggest that aspects of utilitarianism that go together at the philosophical context are actually independent, and even in tension, in the psychology of ordinary folk. I will end by exploring how such work might shed light on the psychological roots of utilitarianism.

    Guy Kahane
    Associate Professor
    Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy, Pembroke College
    University of Oxford

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Sep 19, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: The Fog of War

     

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Sep 13, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Aaron Ancell

    Utopianism and Political Irrationality

     [☛ eVideo]

    Common ideas about how democracy should work require that people be informed and rational. Yet empirical studies of political beliefs and voting behaviour show that, at least when it comes to politics, people tend to be ignorant and irrational. To what extent must we adjust our ideas about how democracy should work in order to account for these facts? Many prominent philosophers argue that the problem is people, not our ideas about democracy, and that we simply need to work harder to be informed and rational. I argue that these philosophers underestimate the problem by ignoring the social and psychological mechanisms that underly much political ignorance and irrationality.

    Aaron Ancell
    Postdoctoral Fellow in Ethics
    Centre for Ethics

    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Sep 11, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics, Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Joe Halpern, Moral Responsibility, Blameworthiness, and Intention: In Search of Formal Definitions

    Moral Responsibility, Blameworthiness, and Intention: In Search of Formal Definitions

     [☛ eVideo]

    The need for judging moral responsibility arises both in ethics and in law.  In an era of autonomous vehicles and, more generally, autonomous AI agents, the issue has now become relevant to AI as well.  Although hundreds of books and thousands of papers have been written on moral responsibility, blameworthiness, and intention, there is surprisingly little work on defining these notions formally.  But we will need formal definitions in order for AI agents to apply these notions.  In this talk, I take some preliminary steps towards defining these notions.

    This is joint work with Max Kleiman-Weiner.

    Joe Halpern
    Cornell University
    Computer Science Department

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Aug 28, 2017

    Martina Pavlikova: Toward a Digital Media Ethics

    Martina Pavlikova
    Constantine the Philosopher University in Nitra
    Slovakia

    This presentation identifies some points to consider for developing a digital media ethics: Who is a journalist? Is it somebody who represents anonymity, good taste, and common decency? The internet and digital media have become means of sharing knowledge around the world, building connections between politics, economics, and culture. They can do so instantly and interactively (e.g., Twitter, Facebook, blogs). At the same time this very tool is also a means of bringing into the homes and lives of people disturbing images, fake news, and misinformation in the name of ideology, national security, and advertisement for a consumer driven society. Additionally, amateur and professional journalists engaged in blogging and tweeting indicate that we are moving toward a form of mixed media journalism. This means creating new guidelines pertaining to amateurs and professionals, for reporting and advertising instantly and interactively. What are the minimum ethical principles that might safeguard against fraudulent reporting and what examples of hard cases might test these principles?

    co-sponsored by Trinity College, Faculty of Divinity

    02:00 PM - 04:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, Jun 8, 2017
    Events on Campus
    Dying for Change: How to Heal Canada's Healthcare System

    The Institute of Medical Science presents:

    UofT Talks – Dying for Change: How to Heal Canada’s Healthcare System

    June 8th, 2017, 7-9pm

    TELUS Centre for Performance and Learning, Mazzoleni Hall
    273 Bloor Street West, Toronto

    Tickets available at www.uofttalks.ca

    UofT Talks aims to promote inter-disciplinary learning and networking through a symposium catered to everyone within all four School of Graduate Studies (SGS) divisions- Humanities, Social Science, Life Science, and Physical Sciences.

    This year, join us in discussing our national pride: Canada’s universal healthcare system. Explore the strengths and shortcomings of our current model. Discover if and how we can implement critical changes to secure healthcare for all Canadians. 

    Our featured speakers include Neil D. Fraser, President of Medtronic, and Dr. Danielle Martin, a family physician that is a strong advocate for better, universal healthcare and who infamously testified at the US senate in 2014 on what the United States healthcare system can learn from other countries. 

    07:00 PM - 09:00 PM
    Telus Centre for Performance and Learning
    273 Bloor Street West

  • Thu, Jun 8, 2017
    Events on Campus
    Historical Injustices Against the LGBTI Community in Germany and Canada

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Rm 161, University College
    University of Toronto

  • Mon, Jun 5, 2017
    Events on Campus
    Humanities in the 21st Century: The Research University in the World

    The Jackman Humanities Institute will host a special conference on 5-6 June 2017 to mark the 10th anniversary of the Jackman gifts that founded the JHI.  The occasion will be an opportunity to think about the place of humanities research within the university and in the world at large.  This event is free and open to all, but registration is requested.

    Please help us to get the word out by sharing this information widely with your faculty, staff, and students.  All are welcome.

    Information:  https://www.humanities.utoronto.ca/event_details/id=2883

    Registration:  https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/humanities-for-the-21st-century-tickets-32851871833

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
    Innis College Town Hall
    2 Sussex Avenue

  • Wed, May 17, 2017
    Events on Campus
    Well-Being and Changing Attitudes

    Krister Bykvist
    Professor of Practical Philosophy
    University of Stockholm

    02:00 PM - 04:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, May 8, 2017
    Conferences
    Embodiment: Bodies and Embodied Experience

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, May 5, 2017
    Public Lectures, Conferences
    Om Canada: What Scandals Teach Us About Religion, Diversity, and National Imaginaries

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Jackman Humanities Institute, Room JH100A

  • Fri, May 5, 2017
    Conferences
    Imagining 150: The Ethics of Canada’s Sesquicentennial

    CFP-UofT Centre for Ethics-Imagining 150The 5th Annual
    University of Toronto
    Centre for Ethics

    Graduate Student Conference
    May 5, 2017

    With the onset of Canada’s sesquicentennial year, Canadian institutions, collectives, and individuals are organizing a myriad of retrospectives and celebrations. The sesquicentennial year itself, and these diverse recognitions, present an invaluable opportunity for ethical reflection as well as critical assessment, both of the anniversary and of the idea of Canada itself. It prompts essential inquiries, like what are the ethical and political consequences of counting back 150 years to Canada’s “founding”? What kind of ethical exercise is the celebration of a national anniversary? In what ways does the category of national sovereignty reify identities and imaginaries that not all the territory’s inhabitants accept? And how do moments of national reflection elicit ethical questions about multiple categories of the Canadian imaginary?

    On May 5, 2017 the University of Toronto’s Centre for Ethics, hosts a graduate conference to explore the multiplicity of ethical questions this celebration prompts. Mobilizing its unique positioning as an interdisciplinary space examining ethics at the University of Toronto, and building on the groundwork of previous graduate conferences, the Centre for Ethics invites graduate students from the University of Toronto and the wider Canadian academic community to present work related to our theme from across the humanities and social sciences. This two-day event features faculty discussants as well as a public keynote address by University of Victoria Professor Paul Bramadat. For students and faculty who attend this conference it will be an indispensable opportunity to meet across disciplines and to use the shared questions of ethics to think carefully through what Canadian poet Al Purdy called “the more easily kept illusions.”

    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, May 4, 2017
    Events on Campus
    Techniques of the Corporation

    Over the last 150 years, corporations, like universities and laboratories, have generated an abundance of knowledge-making techniques in the form of psychological test, efficiency technologies, scenario planning, and logistical systems. As dominant forms of the last century, corporations are assembled with instruments, infrastructures, and interventions that arrange and rearrange the dynamics of capitalism. These techniques of the corporation have filtered into our daily lives, influencing everyday understandings of self, inequality, environment, and society.

    Techniques of the Corporation will assemble an interdisciplinary network of established and emerging scholars whose work contributes to the critical study of the techniques, epistemologies, and imaginaries of the 20th century corporation. This conference aims to foster a timely conversation between Science and Technology Studies (STS) approaches and the recent histories of capitalism. We treat the corporation in the same way that historians of science and STS scholars have approached science, colonialism, and militarism as generative sites for knowledge production, value-making, and technopolitics. The conference takes as its starting place North American corporations with the understanding that corporations are multinational forms with complex transnational histories. Building from the recent history of capitalism, we attend to the entangled genealogies of corporations with slavery, exploitation, environmental destruction, colonialism, and inequality.

    Hosted by the Technoscience Research Unit at the University of Toronto, from 4-6 May, 2017, this event will be an intimate multi-day conversation between established and emerging scholars in the fields of STS, history of science, and the history of capitalism. Techniques of the Corporation will be headlined by keynote speaker Joseph Dumit, and features invited talks by Dan Bouk, Elspeth Brown, Deborah Cowen, Orit Halpern, Louis Hyman, Michelle Murphy, Martha Poon, and Elise Thorburn. The conference will be an immersive experience in the Greater Toronto Area with meals and cocktails provided.

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
    George Ignatieff Theatre, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Apr 27, 2017
    Conferences
    Rencontre annuelle/Annual Meeting: Centre de recherche en éthique (CRÉ) & Centre for Ethics, UofT

    Montréal-Toronto 2 revd

    02:00 PM - 04:15 PM
    Université de Montréal
    2910, boul Édouard-Montpetit

  • Thu, Apr 20, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: The Look of Silence

    Joshua Oppenheimer’s Oscar-nominated The Look of Silence is the incredible story of a man confronting his brother’s killers and demanding they accept responsibility for their crimes. Adi, an optometrist who survived the 1965 Indonesian genocide, takes this unimaginable step in a society where murderers remain in power. To break the spell of submission and terror, he forces them, and us, to reckon with his country’s dark history. A companion piece to Oppenheimer’s The Act of Killing, also an Oscar nominee, The Look of Silence has been hailed as a “masterpiece” by The New York Times for bearing witness to the collapse of 50 years of silence. (Source: PBS)

    Eventbrite - Ethics & Film: The Look of Silence

    03:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Apr 7, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Thinking about Jews: Judaism, and the Jewish Question in the Construction of Modern Political Community

    Cáit Power

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Apr 4, 2017
    Public Lectures
    Pax Romana: Peace, Pacification, and the Ethics of Empire

    A C4E Public Lecture by

    Clifford Ando
    University of Chicago
    David B. and Clara E. Stern Professor
    Professor of Classics, History and Law and in the College
    Co-Director, Center for the Study of Ancient Religions, University of Chicago
    Research Fellow, Department of Classics and World Languages, University of South Africa

    Contemporary scholarship tends to assimilate empires to one another as kindred in form, and likewise construes the experience of conquest and subjection in light of supposedly universal ideologies of autonomy and rebellion. However, the ancient Mediterranean in general—and Rome in particular—should be differentiated from such claims. Roman theory and practice in governing conquered populations must be understood as arising in a situation of weak state power. This has profound implications for how they understood the ethics of empire.
    Free and open to the public. Reception to follow the lecture.

    Eventbrite - Pax Romana: Peace, Pacification, and the Ethics of Empire

    04:15 PM - 06:00 PM
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 31, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    A Chinese Version of Cosmopolitan Global Justice – Kang Youwei’s Da Tong shu

    Binfan Wang

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 29, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Clifton Mark – Crying Foul vs. Just Crying: On the Role of Instrumental Goals in Moral Struggles

    Crying Foul vs. Just Crying: On the Role of Instrumental Goals in Moral Struggles

    Clifton Mark
    Postdoctoral Research Fellow
    Centre for Ethics

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 24, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: The Act of Killing

    Executive produced by Errol Morris (The Fog Of War) and Werner Herzog (Grizzly Man), The Act of Killing examines a country where killers are celebrated as heroes and the filmmakers challenge unrepentant death squad leaders to re-enact their real-life mass-killings in the style of the American movies they love. The hallucinatory result is a cinematic fever dream, an unsettling journey deep into the imaginations of mass-murderers and the shockingly banal regime of corruption and impunity they inhabit. (Source: TIFF)

    Eventbrite - Ethics & Film: The Act of Killing

    03:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 24, 2017
    Professing Ethics
    Legal Ethics in the Age of Law and Tech

     [☛ eVideos]

    Join a distinguished panel of international experts to explore the implications of recent and future developments in law & technology for contemporary legal ethics.law and tech 2 cpd

    • Technological competence: how much are lawyers obliged to adapt to technological change?
    • How is artificial intelligence transforming the legal profession and expectations of professional competence?
    • Machine learning’s impact on the legal profession and legal ethics: threat or opportunity?
    • How can lawyers protect the privacy of client information in light of technological developments?
    • How can lawyers use technology to become more efficient, including formulating more sophisticated search queries and, perhaps, learning to code?
    • Automated prediction of judicial decisionmaking based on neuro-linguistic programming (NLP): the example of the European Court of Human Rights
    • What is the relation between legal ethics, technology, and the rule of law?

    Free!
    Eventbrite - Legal Ethics in the Age of Law and Tech
    cpdAccredFor Ontario lawyers, this program contains 1 hr 30 min Professionalism Hour(s).

    Panelists:

    Paul Gowder, University of Iowa College of Law download

     

     

    HildebrandtMireille Hildebrandt, Law Science Technology and Society, Vrije Universiteit Brussels & Institute for Computing and Information Sciences, University of Nijmegen 

     

    Frank Pasquale, University of Maryland School of Law 

     

     

    Dana Remus, University of North Carolina School of Law & Senior Counsel and Special Assistant to the President in the Office of White House Counsel (until 2016) 

     

    CILPlogoCo-sponsored with Centre for Innovation Law and Policy, University of Toronto

     

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 22, 2017

    Humanomics: A Better Plan for the Social Sciences

     

    Professor Deirdre McCloskey will lead a graduate seminar at the Centre for Ethics on March 14th from 12:30-2pm in the Larkin Building, Room 200.

    Professor McCloskey will discuss how economics, in the opinion of economists, is the queen of the social sciences. Econowannabes in other fields seem to agree. But Samuelsonian economics, the study of a charming sociopath named Max U, leaves out what can be learned from the humanities. The humanistic step of categorization lies behind any scientific program, because science is about human questions. Humanomics keeps mathematics and quantification, but adds literature, theology, philosophy, rhetoric and ethics to make a full social science.

    Admission is free by registration and open to the public. Register here.

    This event is possible because of the generous support of Paul Cadario, SPPG Advisory Board member and Senior Fellow at U of T, as well as the generous support of the Departments of Economics and Political Science at U of T.

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 22, 2017

    Deborah Stone, Why Statistics Should be Taught as Ethics, Not Math

     

    Professor Deborah Stone will lead a graduate seminar at the Centre for Ethics on March 22 from 12:30-2pm in the Larkin Building, Room 200.

    From simple tallies to complex quantitative analyses, counting necessarily requires value choices. Historically, measurement has always been intimately connected to notions of distributive justice and procedural fairness. This seminar explores some of these connections and what it means to count with integrity.

    Admission is free by registration and open to the public. Register here.

    This event is possible because of the generous support of Paul Cadario, SPPG Advisory Board member and Senior Fellow at U of T, as well as the generous support of the Departments of Economics and Political Science at U of T.

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 22, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Shaun Young: Politicians and Privacy

    Politicians and Privacy

    Shaun Young, DPhil
    Special Projects Officer, Strategic Initiatives
    Office of the Vice-President, Research & Innovation
    University of Toronto

    Abstract:
    Privacy is often identified as an essential element of being human: adequately respecting human dignity requires acknowledging and (reasonably) accommodating individuals’ privacy. During the preceding four decades the “private” lives of politicians have been subjected to an increasing degree of public scrutiny; so much so that it might be argued that those pursuing or occupying elected political office – especially senior positions (e.g., heads of state, Cabinet ministers) – are often denied a degree of privacy commensurate with adequately respecting and protecting human dignity.
    In this talk Shaun Young addresses the following question: Is it ethically legitimate to subject politicians’ behaviour to a degree of public scrutiny that is notably greater than that experienced by their fellow citizens?

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 17, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    From Gargantua to Leviathan: Rabelais, Hobbes, and the Eclipse of Fun

    Zak Black

    03:00 PM - 04:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 15, 2017
    C4E Flash Event, Professing Ethics
    The Ethics of Lawyering in Sexual Assault Cases

    Craig 3cpd revd invertA year later, the trial and acquittal of Jian Ghomeshi in March 2016 continues to stir controversy about the Canadian criminal justice system’s handling of sexual assault cases. The question which ethical norms should govern defence counsel in these cases is among the many still contentious issues, as evidenced by the recent controversy surrounding an invitation extended to Ghomeshi’s defence lawyer, Marie Henein, to give a university lecture.

    This Centre for Ethics event aims to stimulate thoughtful public debate about the important and complex ethical issues raised by sexual assault cases in the criminal process, including not only the role of defence attorneys, but also that of other systems participants, notably prosecutors and judges.

    Free! This event was originally scheduled for February 13, 2017. 
    Eventbrite - The Ethics of Lawyering in Sexual Assault Cases

    Participants:


    1467635674147Elaine Craig, Associate Professor, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University, Author of “The Ethical Obligations of Defence Counsel in Sexual Assault Cases” (2014) & “The Ethical Identity of Sexual Assault Lawyers” (2016)

     

     

    downloadAlison Craig, Partner, Lockyer Campbell Posner, Toronto (Discussant)

     

     

     

    cpdAccredFor Ontario lawyers, this program contains 1 hr 50 min Professionalism Hour(s).
    .

    06:10 PM - 08:00 PM
    George Ignatieff Theatre, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 15, 2017
    Ethics at Noon, Ethics & the Arts, Critical Ethics
    The Ethics of Legal Fictions

     [☛ eVideo]

    5-07

     

    legal fictionsLegal fictions, like “corporate personhood” or “constructive possession,” are often seen as ethically suspect because of the way they distort the reality that law operates on.

    • Do legal fictions differ from other legal devices such as presumptions, hypotheses, and “deeming” provisions?
    • Or do they merely illustrate a pattern that is typical of legal thinking more generally?
    • What’s a legal fiction anyway?

    Presenter:
    Simon Stern, Associate Professor of Law and English & Co-Director, Centre for Innovation Law & Policy, University of Toronto

    Free and open to the public.

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Mar 14, 2017
    Understanding Ethics
    Understanding the Process of Moralization: How Eating Meat Becomes a Moral Issue

    babe_2409351a-large_trans_NvBQzQNjv4BqqVzuuqpFlyLIwiB6NTmJwfSVWeZ_vEN7c6bHu2jJnT8

    • How does moral change occur?
    • How does something that’s morally neutral take on moral properties?
    • What role do emotions and cognition play?

    Free!
    Eventbrite - Understanding the Process of Moralization: How Eating Meat Becomes a Moral Issue

    Presenter:
    Matthew Feinberg, Assistant Professor, Rotman School of Management

    04:15 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 10, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975


    white pageTHE BLACK POWER MIXTAPE 1967-1975
    mobilizes a treasure trove of 16mm material shot by Swedish journalists who came to the US drawn by stories of urban unrest and revolution. Gaining access to many of the leaders of the Black Power Movement—Stokely Carmichael, Bobby Seale, Angela Davis and Eldridge Cleaver among them—the filmmakers captured them in intimate moments and remarkably unguarded interviews. Thirty years later, this lush collection was found languishing in the basement of Swedish Television. Director Göran Olsson and co-producer Danny Glover bring this footage to light in a mosaic of images, music and narration chronicling the evolution one of our nation’s most indelible turning points, the Black Power movement. Music by Questlove and Om’Mas Keith, and commentary from prominent African-American artists and activists who were influenced by the struggle — including Erykah Badu, Harry Belafonte, Talib Kweli, and Melvin Van Peebles — give the historical footage a fresh, contemporary resonance and makes the film an exhilarating, unprecedented account of an American revolution. (Source: IFC Films)

    Free!
    Eventbrite - Ethics & Film: The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975

    Das-SunitDr. Sunit Das was born in Dhaka, Bangladesh, and grew up in Detroit. He studied English Literature at the University of Michigan and Philosophy at Harvard University before obtaining an MD from Northwestern University and a PhD in Neurobiology at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, MD. He joined the faculty at St. Michael’s Hospital and University of Toronto in 2010.

     

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Mar 9, 2017
    C4E Flash Event
    The Ethics of Fake News

    fake news posterUofT’s Ethics, Society, and Law Students’ Association in collaboration with the Centre for Ethics is hosting an academic panel discussion on The Ethics of Fake News. We are living in what is repeatedly referred to as the post-truth era, witnessing a loss of trust in traditional media outlets, and social media accelerating the circulation of false, unverified, and exaggerated information. The term “fake news” itself has become deeply controversial as its use has devolved from a critique of the proliferation of false stories and conspiracy theories, to an attack on the legitimacy of political opposition; even the pervasiveness of the problem remains contentious. This discussion will explore the ethical obligations that apply to both producers and consumers of journalism, recognizing that inflammatory distortion of facts is not a partisan issue, but a threat to the function of a free, open, and critical press.

    Jeffrey Dvorkin, lecturer and director of the Journalism Program at UTSC, and also a board member of the Canadian Journalism foundation, is a frequent commentator on ethics of media in the digital age and the future of the journalism industry.

    Kathy English, the current public editor of the Toronto Star, and a member of the Canadian Journalism Association Ethics Panel and the executive committee of the Canadian Journalism foundation brings a unique perspective through her direct experience of upholding and enforcing journalistic ethics and responsibility.

    Free and open to the public! Register here.

    04:15 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 8, 2017
    Ethics at Noon, Critical Ethics
    The Financialization of Universities: Institutional Transparency and Accountability in the Age of "The Art of the Deal"

    MV invertUniversity governance, at U of T as at other institutions, has been called into question on a regular but sporadic basis (at U of T, when the arrangements relating to setting up the Munk School were revealed, or more recently by the campaign to divest from fossil fuels). What we collectively lack, however, is a good picture of everyday governance processes. I have been conducting research on just one aspect of university activities, namely decision-making concerning capital projects.

    To critically analyze the capital-project and related financing decisions, in universities as in the rest of the Ontario public sector, simply waving the flag of “transparency” is insufficient. U of T and similar broader public sector entities do make public a great number of documents. But neither the content nor the format of the documents that are publicly available, many of which I have closely studied, help to understand who decides what and when, and what evidence is used to make important decisions that, among other things, commit the university to continually increase both tuition fees and ancillary fees.

    Presenter:
    Mariana Valverde, Professor, Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies, University of Toronto

    Free and open to the public.
    Eventbrite - The Financialization of Universities in the Age of "The Art of the Deal"

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 6, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: The Act of Killing

    The_Act_of_Killing_(2012_film)

    Executive produced by Errol Morris (The Fog Of War) and Werner Herzog (Grizzly Man), The Act of Killing examines a country where killers are celebrated as heroes and the filmmakers challenge unrepentant death squad leaders to re-enact their real-life mass-killings in the style of the American movies they love. The hallucinatory result is a cinematic fever dream, an unsettling journey deep into the imaginations of mass-murderers and the shockingly banal regime of corruption and impunity they inhabit. (Source: TIFF)

    03:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 6, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Liam Murphy – Seminar Series

    Illusory Moral Rules: How Law Misleads Us About Morality

    Liam B. Murphy
    Herbert Peterfreund Professor of Law and Professor of Philosophy
    New York University School of Law

    Co-sponsored by Faculty of Law

    12:15 PM - 02:15 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 3, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    What kind of Good is Non-Domination?

    Dr. Ian Ward

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Feb 17, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Who is the ‘We’ that judges? Constituting the people in the courts and the theatre

    Ella Street

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Feb 16, 2017
    C4E Flash Event
    "Conscience for Change": Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1967 Massey Lectures

    mlk-featured

    On their 50th anniversary, drop by the Centre for Ethics during the week before Reading Week to listen to, “watch,” and reflect on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s powerful and still resonant 1967 Massey Lectures. For a preview, see here.

    Canada is not merely a neighbor to Negroes.  Deep in our history of struggle for freedom Canada was the north star.
    So standing today in Canada I am linked with the history of my people and its unity with your past. (Lecture 1)

    Schedule (subject to change):

    • Monday, February 13: Lecture 1 (“Impasse in Race Relations”)
    • Tuesday, February 14: Lecture 2 (“Conscience and the War in Vietnam”)
    • Wednesday, February 15: Lecture 3 (“Youth and Social Action”)
    • Thursday, February 16: Lecture 4 (“Nonviolence and Social Change”)

    Eventbrite - "Conscience for Change": Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1967 Massey Lectures

    12:00 PM - 01:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Feb 15, 2017
    C4E Flash Event
    "Conscience for Change": Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1967 Massey Lectures

    mlk-featured

    On their 50th anniversary, drop by the Centre for Ethics during the week before Reading Week to listen to, “watch,” and reflect on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s powerful and still resonant 1967 Massey Lectures. For a preview, see here.

    Canada is not merely a neighbor to Negroes.  Deep in our history of struggle for freedom Canada was the north star.
    So standing today in Canada I am linked with the history of my people and its unity with your past. (Lecture 1)

    Schedule (subject to change):

    • Monday, February 13: Lecture 1 (“Impasse in Race Relations”)
    • Tuesday, February 14: Lecture 2 (“Conscience and the War in Vietnam”)
    • Wednesday, February 15: Lecture 3 (“Youth and Social Action”)
    • Thursday, February 16: Lecture 4 (“Nonviolence and Social Change”)

    Eventbrite - "Conscience for Change": Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1967 Massey Lectures

    12:00 PM - 01:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Feb 14, 2017
    Critical Ethics
    The Ethics and Economics of Incentivizing the Uninformed

    eForum

    forestScorpionEdit

    • When people debate the ethics of medical trials, organ donation, or egg donation, do the arguments they typically use hold up under experimental scrutiny?
    • What can experimental and behavioral economics tell us about ethics in general, and medical ethics in particular?
    • How do incentives affect ethical decision making?
    • How do people determine when, why and how voluntary transactions should be restricted?
    • What are the empirical moral limits of markets?

    Presenter:

    downloadSandro Ambuehl, Department of Management UTSC & Rotman School of Management

     

     

    Discussants:

    download (2)Cendri Hutcherson, Department of Psychology; Toronto Decision Neuroscience Lab

     

     

    download (1)

    Nicola Lacetera, Department of Management UTM & Rotman School of Management

     

     

     

     

     

     

    04:15 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Feb 14, 2017
    C4E Flash Event
    "Conscience for Change": Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1967 Massey Lectures

    mlk-featured

    On their 50th anniversary, drop by the Centre for Ethics during the week before Reading Week to listen to, “watch,” and reflect on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s powerful and still resonant 1967 Massey Lectures. For a preview, see here.

    Canada is not merely a neighbor to Negroes.  Deep in our history of struggle for freedom Canada was the north star.
    So standing today in Canada I am linked with the history of my people and its unity with your past. (Lecture 1)

    Schedule (subject to change):

    • Monday, February 13: Lecture 1 (“Impasse in Race Relations”)
    • Tuesday, February 14: Lecture 2 (“Conscience and the War in Vietnam”)
    • Wednesday, February 15: Lecture 3 (“Youth and Social Action”)
    • Thursday, February 16: Lecture 4 (“Nonviolence and Social Change”)

    Eventbrite - "Conscience for Change": Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1967 Massey Lectures

    12:00 PM - 01:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Feb 13, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Jennifer Cyd Rubenstein: Money as Politics

    Money as Politics

    Jennifer Cyd Rubenstein
    Department of Politics
    University of Virginia

    Co-sponsored with Trudeau Centre

    Abstract:
    What is the relationship between money and democratic politics? One prominent view is that money corrupts democratic politics. “Get money out of politics!” is a common— and understandable— refrain.  Anyone who cares about political equality is rightly troubled when only wealthy individuals are able to win elected office and when individuals and corporations can “buy” influence by making campaign contributions.  However, a conception of money as an external substance that taints democratic politics obscures as much as it illuminates. It blinds us to the negative political effects of money not captured by the imagery of illegitimate incursion. It also conceals various ways in which activities involving money can promote and enact democratic values of inclusion, equality, and non-paternalism. Instead of conceptualizing money as (only) a foreign substance in politics we ought to also view money as a currency of politics.  Drawing on thinkers ranging from Rousseau and Michael Walzer to Audre Lorde and Viviana Zelizer, and examples including cash transfer programs in Kenya and the Abolitionist movement in the US, the aim of this talk is to bring the diverse political functions of money into view in a way that is helpful in both broad theoretical terms and for responding to our current political moment.

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Feb 13, 2017
    C4E Flash Event
    "Conscience for Change": Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1967 Massey Lectures

    mlk-featured

    On their 50th anniversary, drop by the Centre for Ethics during the week before Reading Week to listen to, “watch,” and reflect on Martin Luther King, Jr.’s powerful and still resonant 1967 Massey Lectures. For a preview, see here.

    Canada is not merely a neighbor to Negroes.  Deep in our history of struggle for freedom Canada was the north star.
    So standing today in Canada I am linked with the history of my people and its unity with your past. (Lecture 1)

    Schedule (subject to change):

    • Monday, February 13: Lecture 1 (“Impasse in Race Relations”)
    • Tuesday, February 14: Lecture 2 (“Conscience and the War in Vietnam”)
    • Wednesday, February 15: Lecture 3 (“Youth and Social Action”)
    • Thursday, February 16: Lecture 4 (“Nonviolence and Social Change”)

    Free and open to the public.
    Eventbrite - "Conscience for Change": Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1967 Massey Lectures

    12:00 PM - 01:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Feb 9, 2017
    Ethics & the Arts
    Leonard Cohen: Ethics and the Artist

     

    C4E_Ethics_and_the_Artist[☛ eForum] [☛ eVideos]

    Join us for an interdisciplinary panel discussion of the ethical dimensions of Leonard Cohen’s life and work…and catch a choir performing selections from Cohen’s songbook.

    When: Feb. 9, 2017, 12:15-2PM
    Where: Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place, University of Toronto

     

     

     

    Panelists:

    george_elliott_clarke_1024x1024George Elliott Clarke, E.J. Pratt Professor of Canadian Literature, University of Toronto, Department of English & Parliamentary Poet Laureate

     

    downloadNorman Ravvin, Professor & Jewish Studies Graduate Program Director, Department of Religions and Cultures, Concordia University

     

    leo-photo-march-09Leonardo Augusto Zaibert, Professor & Chair, Department of Philosophy, Union College 

     

     

    Plus:

    logoVIVA! Youth Singers of Toronto, Laura Menard, Coordinator; Carol Woodward Ratzlaff, Artistic Director

     

     

    Co-sponsors:

    FAC_applied_logo_letterhead

    UofT-English

    Print

     

    12:15 PM - 02:00 PM
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Feb 7, 2017
    Ethics & the Arts
    The Ethics of Ethics and Literature

    eForum

    Join an interdisciplinary roundtable discussion of literary ethics to explore questions about the relationship between ethics and literature, such as:Kingwell poster

    • What is ethical criticism? What’s wrong with it? What’s right? Can criticism ever not be ethical? Should it (try to) be?
    • What’s “ethics and literature” about anyway? Does it have a point? Does it need to have one?
    • Is ethics and literature, ethics? Or literature? Or … both? Neither?
    • How does “ethics and literature” relate to “law and literature”? Law and literature is often said to come in two flavours: “law in literature” and “law as literature”? What’s that distinction about and is there a similar distinction in ethics and literature?
    • Does reading make us more ethical? Is reading itself an ethical act? Writing? Translating?

    Suggested background reading: (1) Mark Kingwell, The Ethics of Ethics and Literature; (2) Richard Posner, Against Ethical Criticism

    Presenter:

    Discussants:

    When: February 7, 2017, 4:15-6PM
    Where: Centre for Ethics, 200 Larkin (@ Trinity College), 15 Devonshire Place, University of Toronto

     

    04:15 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Feb 6, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Ahmed Abdel Meguid: Seminar Series

    Ahmed Abdel Meguid
    Department of Religion
    Syracuse University

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Feb 3, 2017

    Are Refugees Welcome Here? Trump, Immigration, and Canadian Responses

    FINAL CARFMS IHRP EVENTThe Canadian Association of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS) and the International Human Rights Program (UofT) invite you to an informal, information-sharing, and brainstorming session at the Centre for Ethics to discuss the implications of Trump Administration’s Executive Orders on immigration and refugee policy in the US, and political change in Canada.

    Panelists:

    • Salina Abji, SSHRC Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Carleton University
    • Idil Atak, Assistant Professor, Ryerson University
    • Andrew Brouwer, Lawyer, Refugee Law Office
    • Stephanie J. Silverman, Bora Laskin National Fellow in Human Rights
    • Ethel Tungohan, Assistant Professor, York University, and others

    Introduced by Samer Muscati, Director, International Human Rights Program (IHRP), and facilitated by Petra Molnar, migrant rights researcher

    Free and Open to the Public!
    Eventbrite - Are Refugees Welcome Here? Trump, Immigration, and Canadian Responses

    This interdisciplinary conversation will situate the Executive Orders into a historic and sociolegal pattern of violence against specific communities and discuss how to effect positive change in Canadian law and policy.

    Throughout the sixteen year-old “War on Terror,” Muslim and other minorities have been exposed to racially-, religiously-, and ethnically-motivated targeting. Although history demonstrates time and again that refugees are not terrorists, Trump’s Orders specifically link the two and perpetuate the dangerous fallacy that the Muslim community is a source of danger.

    In the wake of the attack at the Quebec City Islamic Cultural Centre, this interactive dialogue will address how to effect realizable change quickly, effectively, and strategically in Canada, as well as how to combat Islamophobia and negative discourses around migration.

    Key points of intervention include:

    • the Safe Third Country Agreement which limits asylum seekers from coming to Canada through the US and results in needlessly life-threatening journeys and drawn-out legal battles

    • the Designated Countries of Origin regime, which works in tandem with, and separately from, the Safe Third Country Agreement to curb and discourage asylum claims from people originating from 40+ countries, including the US, Mexico, and Hungary

    • the Barbaric Practices Act, a Canadian predecessor for ‘”extreme vetting”

    • reopening the “quota” on Groups of Five and Community Sponsors resettling Syrian and Iraqi refugees to Canada

    04:30 PM - 06:00 PM
    George Ignatieff Theatre, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Feb 3, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Paradoxes of Self-Ownership

    Dr. Torrey Shanks

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Feb 1, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Samantha Brennan – Ethics at Noon

    Ethics and Our Early Years: Making Decisions for Children as if Childhood Really Mattered

    Samantha Brennan
    Department of Women’s Studies and Feminist Research
    Western University, London, Ontario
    Member, Rotman Institute of Philosophy
    Follow me on Twitter, @SamJaneB
    I also blog at  Fit Is a Feminist Issue and the Feminist Philosophers Blog

    Abstract:
    What would ethics look like if we took childhood seriously? Philosophy hasn’t always paid much attention to children. Even when children are mentioned, they are often considered simply as the property of their parents. Another, contemporary, way of thinking about children regards them not as property but rather as projects of their parents. But what if children aren’t property or projects? What if they are persons whose moral status matters independently? We can still get it wrong if we only value children on the basis of the adults they’ll become, for this leaves out the moral significance of childhood. It’s an error to include children and evaluate their treatment solely on the basis of the adults they become, by focusing purely on prospective goods. I argue instead that childhood well-being and childhood matters for their own sake.

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Jan 25, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Thomas Ferretti – Ethics at Noon

    Liberal egalitarianism and egalitarian organizations
    Should public institutions promote egalitarian organizations or tolerate inegalitarian ones?

    Thomas Ferretti
    Postdoctoral Research Fellow
    Department of Philosophy and Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Jan 20, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    The Political Problems of Modern Poetry: Rousseau’s On Theatrical Imitation

    Scott Dodds

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Jan 17, 2017
    Author Meets Critics
    Margaret Kohn: The Death and Life of the Urban Commonwealth

    The Death and Life of the Urban CommonwealthPeggys book

    eForum

    Introduction:
    Mayo Moran
    Professor of Law, University of Toronto &
    Provost and Vice-Chancellor of Trinity College, University of Toronto

    Author:
    Margaret Kohn
    Professor of Political Science, University of Toronto

    Critics:
    Theresa Enright, Political Science, University of Toronto
    Roger Keil, Environmental Studies, York University
    Mark Kingwell, Philosophy, University of Toronto
    Mariana Valverde, Criminology, University of Toronto

    04:15 PM - 06:15 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Jan 16, 2017
    Public Issues Forum
    Identity and the State: Immigration, Race and Belonging after the US Election

    Identity and the State: Immigration, Race and Belonging after the US ElectionC4E_ID_and_the_State_Poster
    Monday, January 16
    4:00-6:00 PM
    Nexus Lounge, 12th Floor
    OISE, 252 Bloor St. W.

    Free and Open to the Public!
    Eventbrite - Identity and the State: Immigration, Race and Belonging after the US Election

    The recent US election has destabilized many expectations of the democratic liberal state. Most concerning for some is the insistence of the President-elect on legitimizing race-based and anti-immigrant policies as a defining feature of the new administration. This forum, jointly sponsored by the Centre for Ethics and the Department of Social Justice Education, invites an interdisciplinary panel to consider issues of immigration, race and belonging as we anticipate the inauguration of Donald Trump.

    Panelists

    • Joseph Carens, Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    • Rinaldo Walcott, Director, Women’s and Gender Studies Institute and Associate Professor, Department of Social Justice Education, University of Toronto
    • Mohammad Fadel, Associate Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto
    • Minelle Mahtani, Host Roundhouse Radio 98.3, and Associate Professor, Human Geography and Planning, and the Program in Journalism, University of Toronto, Scarborough

    Moderator

    • Lauren Bialystok, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Justice Education, University of Toronto

    Hosted in collaboration with Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
    252 Bloor Street West

  • Tue, Jan 10, 2017
    C4E Flash Event
    Anti-Authoritarian Professional Ethics for Academics: Doing the Right Thing in the Era of Trump

    antiauthoritarian-academic-code-conduct

    eForum

    In the wake of the recent US election, Rachel Barney, a professor of classics and philosophy at the University of Toronto, turned her mind to the question of how a teacher and scholar could operate with a clear conscience under an authoritarian regime. The result was a professional ethics checklist that has attracted widespread attention, ranging from “I will not aid in the registering, rounding up or internment of students and colleagues on the basis of their religious beliefs” (at No. 1) to “I will be fair and unbiased in the classroom, in grading and in all my dealings with all my students, including those who disagree with me politically” (at No. 10).

    On January 10, 2017, an interdisciplinary panel at the Centre for Ethics discussed Professor Barney’s checklist in the context of questions such as:

    • What ethical norms should guide the behaviour of teachers not only at universities but also elsewhere in the face of an authoritarian, but democratically elected, government? What might give rise to these norms?
    • What conception of the teacher’s role do they reflect? Does it relate to the idea of teaching as a profession? As a calling? As a societal, or social, function or role? Do similar ethical norms apply to other professions (law, medicine, “science”)?
    • Do the same, or different, ethical norms apply to teachers, on one hand, and scholars (researchers, scientists), on the other? Do these norms differ from those governing the behaviour of “ordinary” people, citizens, employers, parents? What role does the claim to scientific expertise, objectivity, or neutrality, play in the notion of “professional ethics” or “scientific ethics”?
    • What distinguishes these “ethical” norms from “political” (or religious) beliefs?
    • How might a broader historical and comparative perspective illuminate consideration of professional ethics in the Era of Trump?

    Panelists

    • Rachel Barney, Canada Research Chair in Ancient Philosophy, Departments of Classics & Philosophy, University of Toronto
    • Lauren Bialystok, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Justice Education, University of Toronto
    • Simon Stern, Associate Professor of Law and English & Co-Director, Centre for Innovation Law & Policy, University of Toronto
    04:15 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Dec 9, 2016
    Public Issues Forum
    How Should We Vote? Electoral Reform in Canada

    electoral reform_final

    A distinguished and diverse panel of policymakers, community representatives, and academics, including a member of the committee, discussed the implications of electoral reform for Canadian democracy in action at a U of T Centre for Ethics Public Issues Forum on Friday, Dec. 9, 2016, at 3:15 pm, at Vivian & David Campbell Conference Facility, Munk School of Global Affairs, 1 Devonshire Place.

    See the event’s eVideos and its eForum for an accompanying mini-symposium.

    On December 1, 2016, the 12-member Special Committee on Electoral Reform released its final report. The parliamentary committee was charged with exploring alternatives to Canada’s first-past-the-post voting system, and to examine mandatory voting and online voting. How do the specific issues explored by the committee connect to more basic concerns about fairness, legitimacy, representativeness, constitutionalism, and ethics at all levels of Canadian politics? What ails Canadian democracy? Is electoral reform necessary, or sufficient, to address these concerns? What lessons, if any, does the recent U.S. election hold for Canadian electoral reform? 

    Participants

    • Ms. Ruby Sahota, MP (L) Brampton-North (Member, Special Committee on Electoral Reform)
    • Ms. Avvy Go, OOnt (Clinic Director, Metro Toronto Chinese & Southeast Asian Legal Clinic; Member, Community Council, Ontario Law Commission)
    • Professor Craig Scott (Osgoode Hall Law School & former MP (NDP) Toronto-Danforth)
    • Professor Yasmin Dawood (Canada Research Chair in Democracy, Constitutionalism, and Electoral Law, University of Toronto Law Faculty)

    Moderator

    • Royson James (Toronto Star)

     

    03:15 PM - 05:00 PM
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Dec 9, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    A Practical Past? The Political Philosophy of Reinhart Koselleck’s Conceptual History

    Dr. Sophie Marcotte Chénard

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 30, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop, Events on Campus
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Dr. Seth Jaffe

    Discussant: Robert Ballingall

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Room 3130, Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George St.

  • Wed, Nov 30, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Kerah Gordon-Solmon: Egalitarianism for Girls

    Egalitarianism for Girls

    Kerah Gordon-Solmon
    Department of Philosophy, Queen’s University

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 25, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    A Catholic Critique of Secularization

    Juan Pablo Aranda Vargas

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 25, 2016
    C4E Flash Event
    "Project Marie": Policing Sexuality in Law, Ethics, Policy

    Project MarieOn November 25, 2016, the Centre for Ethics hosted an interdisciplinary roundtable discussion of issues of law, ethics, and policy raised by “Project Marie,” a two-month operation by the Toronto Police in Marie Curtis Park in Etobicoke. The operation resulted in 89 charges against 72 individuals, primarily for indecent exposure and engaging in sexual activity, 95 per cent of whom are men. [CBC News]

    Participants included Patrick Keilty (UofT iSchool), Kyle Kirkup (uOttawa Law), John Paul Ricco (UofT Art), Simon Stern (UofT Law), and Mariana Valverde (UofT Criminology).

    See the event’s eForum for an accompanying mini-symposium featuring John Paul Ricco, Patrick Keilty & Kyle Kirkup.

    12:30 PM - 02:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 21, 2016
    Author Meets Critics
    Arthur Ripstein: Private Wrongs

    Private WrongsPrivate Wrongs by Arthur Ripstein

    Arthur Ripstein
    University Professor of Law and Philosophy
    University of Toronto

    Panel:
    Rahul Kumar, Philosophy, Queen’s University and Visiting Scholar, Centre for Ethics
    Clifton Mark, Postdoctoral Fellow and Deputy Director, Centre for Ethics
    Dan Priel, Osgoode Law School

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 16, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Rahul Kumar: Saving Lives and Statistical Deaths

    Saving Lives and Statistical Deaths

    Rahul Kumar
    Department of Philosophy, Queen’s University
    Executive Editor, Canadian Journal of Philosophy

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 14, 2016
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Harry Brighouse: Obligations Under non-Ideal Circumstances: The Case of Tenure-line Professors

    Obligations Under non-Ideal Circumstances: The Case of Tenure-line Professors

    Harry Brighouse
    Department of Philosophy
    Department of Education Policy Studies
    University of Wisconsin-Madison

    Co-sponsored by OISE Social Justice

    Abstract:
    Professor Brighouse will provide an overview of the role of elite colleges and universities in society. He will argue that, far from being engines of social mobility, they contribute to unjust inequality of opportunity. Professors at such institutions are unavoidably implicated and complicit in this role. He will argue for reforms in the role of professors at elite colleges and university and, more radically, that even in the absence of such reform individual professors are obliged to make considerable changes in their professional activities, even at considerable risk to their professional advancement.

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 11, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Starting with Rhetoric

    Simon Lambek

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 4, 2016

    Philosophy of Criminal Procedure Conference

    Philosophy of Criminal Procedure Conference

    Vincent Chiao, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto
    Chad Flanders, St. Louis School of Law
    Stephen Galoob, Tulsa Law

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
    Osgoode Law School
    4700 Keele St

  • Wed, Nov 2, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Vida Panitch: Liberalism, Commodification, and Justice

    Liberalism, Commodification, and Justice

    Vida Panitch
    Department of Philosophy, Carleton University

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 28, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Idealizing Humanitas in Cicero’s De Oratore, or, why Herbert O. Morrison was wrong

    Taylor Putnam

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Oct 25, 2016
    Events on Campus
    Living in the Digital Shadows of War

    Speakers

    Amar Amarasingam
    Fellow at the George Washington University’s Program on Extremism

    Naheed Mustafa
    Freelance Writer and Broadcaster

    Chris Tenove
    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Centre for Ethics and Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    People who live far from war zones and repressive states may nevertheless be connected to them through their use of digital communication technologies. This panel will discuss people’s digital vulnerabilities to conflict and repression, and possible responses to those vulnerabilities.

    Debates over cyber security usually focus on threats to military assets, critical infrastructure, and intellectual property, and ignore the individuals who might be at risk. These risks take different forms. Activists around the world are subject to hacking and surveillance, and they participate in propaganda wars on Twitter and Facebook. Alienated young people are targeted for radicalization and recruitment. And people who simply want to communicate with loved ones in repressive states and conflict zones may find that these communications are sources of sorrow or danger rather than solace.

    The panelists will discuss their recent research and reporting on these issues, with an emphasis on the Syrian context. The panel will also serve as the launch of a SSHRC-funded project, The War is Just a Click Away, which includes journalism and expert commentary published by OpenCanada.org.

    04:30 PM - 06:00 PM
    315 Bloor Street West, 1st Floor Boardroom/Round Room/Library
    315 Bloor Street West

  • Wed, Oct 19, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Laurens van Apeldoorn: Hobbes on sovereignty and the unity of the state

    Hobbes on sovereignty and the unity of the state

    Laurens van Apeldoorn
    Department of Philosophy
    University College The Hague
    Leiden University
    The Netherlands

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 14, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Indigenous People and the Legitimacy of Criminal Justice in Canada

    Teddy Harrison
    Doctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Oct 5, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Johann Frick – Ethics at Noon

    On the Survival of Humanity

    Johann Frick
    Department of Philosophy and University Center for Human Values
    Princeton University

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Sep 30, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Aristotle, Equity, and Democracy

    Daniel Schillinger

    03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Sep 28, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Richard Moon – Ethics at Noon

    Conscientious Objections by Civil Servants:  The Case of Marriage Commissioners and Same Sex Civil Marriages

    Richard Moon
    Professor of Law
    University of Windsor

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Sep 26, 2016
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Sarah Stroud – Seminar Series

    Relational Wrongs and the Demands of Justice

    Sarah Stroud
    Department of Philosophy
    McGill University

    Co-sponsored by Jackman Chair

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Sep 16, 2016
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Shmulik Nili – Seminar Series

    Integrity, Individual and Collective

    Shmulik Nili
    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Research School of the Social Sciences (School of Philosophy)
    Australian National University

    12:00 AM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Aug 31, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Anca Gheaus – Ethics at Noon

    Anca Gheus PosterBiological parenthood: gestational, not genetic

    Anca Gheaus
    Department of Law – Philosophy of Law
    Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Sat, May 14, 2016
    Events on Campus
    Approaches to Public Goods: Solidarity and Social Justice

    1Public Goods Workshop

    09:00 AM - 04:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, May 13, 2016
    Events on Campus
    Approaches to Public Goods: Solidarity and Social Justice

    Colour poster SSHRC1Public Goods Workshop

    SSHRC on Public Goods and Solidarity

    The goal of this workshop is to propose innovative ways to respond to conflicts that arise from current practices of public goods distributions. In this workshop we aim to juxtapose two seemingly distinct strands of thought—solidarism as a political theory and perfectionism as an ethical theory—to examine the extent to which they are mutually-reinforcing and to highlight the strengths and vulnerabilities in each approach. Of more practical importance, we aim to contribute to debates among scholars, citizens and policy makers by providing a more compelling rationale for public goods.  We also hope to generate compelling solutions to concrete instances of inequalities that result from unjustifiable distributions of public goods. Participants are invited to draw on their respective areas of expertise in order to explore, conceptually and practically, solutions to social and economic injustice.

    With:  Mara Marin, Charles Lesch, Waheed Hussein, Craig Borowiak, Thilo Schaefer, Margaret Khon, Rutger Claassen, Avigail Ferdman, Patrick Turmel, David Robichaud, Michael Kessler, Karel Martens, Avery Kolers, and Thad Williamson.

    Program Schedule

    Register here

    09:00 AM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, May 5, 2016
    Events on Campus
    REASON AND AGENCY – Graduate Conference in Philosophy

    2016 Graduate Conference Program

    REASON  AND AGENCY
    The 16th Annual University of Toronto Graduate Conference in Philosophy
    May 5 & 6, 2016

    SCHEDULE
    Thursday, May 5, 2016
    Jackman Humanities Building, (170 St. George St.), Room 100A

    9:30 – 10:00     Coffee and Snacks
    10:00 – 11:00   ‘Towards an Ecological Libertarianism’ William Hornett (Sheffield)
    Commentary: Aaron Henry & Parisa Moosavi (Toronto)

    11:15 – 12:15   ‘Some Puzzles about Reasons’ Zachary Blaesi (Texas, Austin) Commentary: Jonathan Payton (Toronto)

    12:15 – 1:45     Lunch Break

    1:45 – 2:45       ‘What ‘No’ Really Means’ Eleanor Gordon-Smith (Sydney) Commentary: Lisa McKeown (New School)

    3:00 – 5:00       Keynote Address
    ‘Bradley’s Regress and a Problem in Action Theory’ Helen Steward (Leeds)
    Commentary: Manish Oza (Toronto)

    5:00 – 7:00       Reception (all conference attendees invited)
    Location: Jackman Humanities Building, Room 418

    Friday, May 6, 2016
    Centre for Ethics, Larkin Building (15 Devonshire Place), Room 200

    9:30 – 10:00      Coffee and Snacks

    10:00 – 11:00   ‘Deontological Evidentialism and the Principle that Ought Implies Can’ Luis Oliveira (UMass, Amherst)
    Commentary: Emma McClure (Toronto)

    11:15 – 12:15    ‘Because I Said So’
    Juan Piñeros Sanchez (Yale) Commentary: John Bunke (Toronto)

    12:15 – 1:45      Lunch Break

    1:45 – 2:45       ‘Reason, Reasoning, and Weakness of Will’ Jeremiah Carey (Berkeley)
    Commentary: Mason Westfall & Rory  Harder (Toronto)

    3:00 – 5:00        Keynote Address
    ‘Retrospection’ Kieran Setiya (MIT)
    Commentary: Benjamin Wald (Toronto)

    6:00– 8:00          Conference Dinner (for invited guests)
    Location: The Host (14 Prince Arthur Ave.)

    Abstracts

    ‘Toward an Ecological Libertarianism – A Defence of Agency Incompatibilism’,
    William Hornett

    In this paper I will defend Helen Steward’s agency incompatibilism by utilising ecological notions in J.J. Gibson’s work on perception and  action. Steward uses  sub-intentional  actions  as counterexamples to a Davidsonian picture of action and presents a competing  picture which identifies actions as bodily movements controlled by the agent – this forms the basis for her libertarianism  as agential control requires a genuinely open future. Her response  to Mele’s luck objection to libertarianism  is that an act of control is predicated on facts about  agent’s gearing toward the action being integrated into the agent’s history prior to the action. She allows prior facts to constrain  actions  and retains  her libertarianism  by arguing that  the agent’s  freedom  lies in their capacity  to refrain from an action-type  or contour  their execution of an action differently than  they in fact did. However, when she later  on denies  that  all actions  are  done  for reasons,  she  thereby  denies  that  these  non-rational actions  have  explanations at  all. This undermines her  response   to  the  luck  objection  with  regards  sub- intentional actions, because their lacking prior reasons is now a reason to say they are not free. This undermines her  original  argument. I  propose  that  she  need  not  make  that  concession  and  can  instead  use  Gibson’s ecological  approach to  define  sub-intentional  actions  as  affordance-responsive  behaviour  which  shares  a structural  similarity to the way rational actions are reasons-responsive. I then suggest the outline, based on the paper’s previous discussions,  of what I call an ecological conception of freedom: to exercise free will is for an animal  to  intentionally  execute  controlled  responses to  environmental changes  perceived  in virtue  of the animal’s tacit understanding of its own bodily structure, capacities, and cognitive architecture.

    ‘Some Puzzles About Reasons’,
    Zachary Blaesi

    Many philosophers working in metaethics take for granted  that the predicates “is a reason for” and “counts in favor of” express or require a common relation, the favoring-relation, which holds of considerations and actions. However, this view encounters a puzzle. For example, suppose  Jones  owes Smith some money and thus has a reason  to pay Smith. In paying Smith, Jones  does what he has reason  to do, and what he does is an action, a concrete particular. But as H. A. Prichard first noted, this concrete  particular does not exist until Jones acts. So, it must  be a mistake  to think that  actions are  relata  in the  favoring-relations  that  hold  before  agents  act. Furthermore, as Roderick Chisholm pointed out, though Jones does what he has reason to do by paying Smith, he could have performed any other number of specific actions while still doing exactly what he has reason to do. This also demands an explanation.  I call the Prichard-Chisholm puzzle the combined  task of explaining what is favored in a favoring-relation and how it relates to particular actions. In my paper, I develop this puzzle in detail and propose a solution.

    ‘What ‘No’ really means’,
    Eleanor Gordon-Smith

    One way we can  exercise  our  agency  is by using  words  to  set  the  boundaries of what  other  people  may permissibly do to us. We can say “no”. What sort of speech  act is a refusal? Rae Langton’s anti-pornography argument claims it is an Austinian ‘illocution’, and therefore  that  it depends on ‘uptake’ – recognition  from its addressee – for its success.  Pornography,  goes the argument,  may teach  that  women who say “no” in sexual settings intend to gesture at modesty or to titillate instead of to refuse. This would cause widespread failures of uptake and render some women unable to use the word “no” to perform a refusal; it would rob them of one way to use words to exercise their agency. In this paper I argue that refusal does not require uptake  to succeed.  At least one important function of a refusal is that it marks a boundary around the refuser and declares all conduct over that line to be boundary-crossing. This function is not directed at any agent. It is simply the conjuring of a fact, and so does not depend  on uptake  by the addressee for its success. This means  it can survive an uptake failure like the one Langton describes.  I show that  this function is separate from – and in fact, prior to – the secondary  function of a refusal, which is to deliver a specific prohibition  to a specific person.  It is a speaker’s agency  – not  any epistemic  facts  about  her  interlocutors  – that  lets  her  use  words  like “no” to  wield the normative power of setting her own boundaries. As a final argument in favour of this account  of refusal, I show that it mirrors our pre-theoretic intuition that consent does not depend on uptake either.

    ‘Deontological Evidentialism and the Principle that Ought Implies Can’,
    Luis Oliveira

    Deontological  evidentialism  is the claim that  S ought  to form or maintain  S’s beliefs in accordance with S’s evidence. One promising argument for this view turns on the premise that consideration c is a normative reason for S to form or maintain  a belief that  p only if c is evidence that p is true. In this paper, I discuss the relation between  a recent  argument  for this key premise—offered separately  by Nishi Shah (2006) and Ward E. Jones (2009)—and the principle that ought implies can. I argue that anyone who antecendently accepts  or rejects this principle already has a reason  to resist either this argument’s premises  or its role in support  of deontological evidentialism.

    ‘Because I Said So’,
    Juan Piñeros Sanchez

    Stephen Darwall has argued that second-personal normativity drives a wedge between practical and theoretical rationality: whereas  it plays a fundamental role in some  areas  of the practical  domain,  it can play at most  a subordinate role in the theoretical one. Darwall’s main argument for this view relies on a picture of theoretical reasoning  as defined by relations between beliefs about  determinate matters  of fact. Partly by questioning  this picture,  I hope  to show that  second-personal normativity  plays as fundamental a role in some  areas  of the theoretical domain  as  well. My  central argument   against  Darwall is based  on  an  analysis  of what  I  call relationships of ‘expectational  trust’, where a person  asks us to believe they will do something  that  is in their power. Such relations, I argue, can give rise to reasons that are theoretical and fundamentally second-personal. The result is a picture of theoretical rationality that  allows for the kinds of rich second-personal relations  that authors like Darwall and Michael Thompson have argued are present  in the practical domain.

    ‘Reason, Reasoning, and Weakness of Will’,
    Jeremiah Carey

    In Plato’s  Protagoras, Socrates  defends  an  intellectualist  moral  psychology  –he argues  that  all action  is motivated  by evaluative belief. Plato himself seems to reject this view in the Republic, claiming that  there are three  distinct  sources  of motivation, reason, spirit, and  appetite. Though I  don’t  go into the  details  of this historic dialectic, I want to defend Plato’s side of the general debate. I begin by arguing that weak-willed action could not possibly be an expression of practical reason. Thus, if weak-willed action is possible, we must have a way of acting  intentionally  i.e., for reasons)  in addition  to  our  faculty  of reason.  After showing  how  this argument holds up against approaches from Michael Bratman and Pamela Hieronymi, I say briefly how I think we should respond  to this argument – by accepting  a new tripartite  theory of motivation  consisting of reason, desire, and will.

    09:30 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 100A, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Sat, Apr 30, 2016
    Events on Campus
    Graduate Associates Annual Conference

    Graduate Associates Annual Conference

     

    08:00 AM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Apr 29, 2016
    Events on Campus
    Deus v. Machina – Graduate Conference at the Centre for Ethics

    Graduate Associates Annual Conference

    http://graduateassociates.wix.com/conf2016

    Keynote Address

    “Thinking About Cognitive Scientists Thinking About Religion”

    John Lardas Modern, Franklin and Marshall College

    April 29th, 4- 6 PM

    Room JH 100A, Jackman Humanities Building

    Modern teaches classes in American religious history, literature, technology, and aesthetics. Modern is the author of The Bop Apocalypse: The Religious Visions of Kerouac, Ginsberg, and Burroughs (University of Illinois Press, 2001) and Secularism in Antebellum America (University of Chicago Press, 2011). Modern’s work has appeared in journals such as American Literary History,Social Text, Journal of the American Academy of Religion, Church History, Method & Theory in the Study of Religion as well as in a range of on-line venues.  Modern’s work has been funded by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Social Science Research Council. He is currently at work on two projects: “The Religion Machine, or; A Particular History of Cognitive Science” and “Akron Devo Divine: A Delirious History of Rubber At the End of the World.” Modern is an editor-at-large for The Immanent Frame. He was also co-curator of Frequencies: A Collaborative Genealogy of Spirituality and is currently co-editor of Class 200: New Studies in Religion (both with Kathryn Lofton)

    This lecture offers a genealogical perspective on the hyperactive agency detection device (HADD), a central concept in the contemporary cognitive science of religion. HADD is a machine of sorts, inside your head right now. Indeed, HADD is the machine that makes your prayers possible. It is a prayer machine by any other name. It scans the horizon for movement and pattern and alerts us to forces of otherness, variously construed. It is the machine that runs the programs of prayer, of sensing God as a fully realized agent. It is on all of the time, a form of troubleshooting the lines of transmission between you and what is on the other side of the screen. And it is the thing, this machine—for if we are talking about science we must be talking about the talking about materiality—that is said to offer some purchase on the phenomena of religion.

    Register for the Keynote

    08:00 AM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Apr 15, 2016
    Events on Campus
    Joint Conference Centre de recherche en éthique (CRÉ), UofM and Centre for Ethics, UofT

    Program

    CRE poster

    09:30 AM - 02:20 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Apr 14, 2016
    Events on Campus
    Joint Conference Centre de recherche en éthique (CRÉ), UofM and Centre for Ethics, UofT

    Program

    CRE poster

    01:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Apr 13, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Cristina Rodriguez

    Presidential Power and the Role of Discretion in Immigration

    Cristina Rodriguez
    Leighton Homer Surbeck Professor of Law
    Yale Law School
    Visiting Scholar, Centre for Ethics (2015-16)
    Cristina Rodriguez

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Apr 8, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Apr 6, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics Hour – Andrew Franklin-Hall – CANCELLED

    Andrew Franklin-Hall
    Department of Philosophy
    University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Apr 4, 2016
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk – Cecile Fabre

    Cecile Fabre

    Economic Sanctions
    Cecile Fabre
    All Souls College
    Oxford

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Apr 1, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 23, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – William Conklin

    A Parable, the Leap and the Written Legal Language

    William Conklin Poster

    Bill Conklin, F.R.S.C.
    Professor,
    Windsor Law
    http://ssrn.com/author=89895

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 18, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Dr. Andrea Cassatella

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 14, 2016
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk – Christine Korsgaard

    Christine KorsgaardAnimal Selves and the Good

    Christine Korsgaard
    Department of Philosophy
    Harvard University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 11, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop 02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 9, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Julia Nefsky

    Julia Nefsky

    Individual Consumption and Collective Impact
    Department of Philosophy, UofT
    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 4, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Presenter: Rebecca Kingston

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 340, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Feb 26, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Dr. Clifford Orwin
    UofT

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Feb 22, 2016
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk – Ebrahim Moosa

    Dilemmas in the Prohibition of Slavery in Islam: How the Islamic States Gets Away with Slavery
    EMoosa
    Ebrahim Moosa
    Professor of Islamic Studies
    Co-director, Contending Modernities program
    Keough School for Global Affairs
    University of Notre Dame, Indiana

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Feb 12, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Dr. Michaele Ferguson
    University of Colorado Boulder

    Cooptation or Complicity Poster

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Feb 10, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics Hour – Jennifer Nedelsky

    Jennifer Nedelsky
    Department of Political Science
    University of Toronto
    Jennifer Nedelsky

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Feb 5, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop 02:00 PM - 10:30 AM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Jan 29, 2016
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Michael Millerman
    Beginning with Heidegger

    Discussant: Professor Joseph Carens

    If you would like to read the paper, please contact: teddy.harrison@mail.utoronto.ca

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Jan 29, 2016
    Events on Campus
    Identifying and Analyzing Gaps in Protection for Asylum Seekers from the Middle East: Recent Research and Findings

    Jan29-panel-poster

    The ongoing humanitarian crises in the Middle East are provoking large-scale refugee movements. Across neighbouring states and during transit, existing legal and policy frameworks are proving incapable of securing safety and protection for these refugees. While reforms are urgently needed, any structural or local-level proposals should take into account the voices of refugees as well as firsthand reports from the field.

    This University of Toronto panel aims to contribute productively to the conversation on durable solutions.

    Panel presenters:
    Craig D. Smith, PhD candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Gulay Kilicaslan, PhD candidate, Department of Sociology, York University
    Nicholas A. R. Fraser, PhD candidate, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Raluca Bejan, PhD candidate, Faculty of SociaI Work, University of Toronto

    Sponsors:
    Canadian Association of Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS)
    Centre for Ethics

    Conveners:
    Alizee Bodson (Diaspora Studies)
    Stephanie J. Silverman (Centre for Ethics) University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Jan 28, 2016
    Author Meets Critics
    Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules that Run the World

    Blood Oil: Tyrants, Violence, and the Rules that Run the World
    Leif Wenar

    • Powerful explanations of how our everyday shopping puts money into the pockets of many of the most merciless men on earth
    • Discovers how today’s natural resource trade runs on the same rule that once made the slave trade, colonialism, apartheid and genocide legal
    • Describes the way the West can lead the world the next step forward in history through a peaceful resource revolution
    Leif Wenar holds the Chair of Philosophy and Law at King’s College London. He earned his degrees in Philosophy from Stanford and from Harvard, where he worked with John Rawls and with Robert Nozick. He has been a Visiting Professor at Princeton and at Stanford, and has been a Fellow of the Carnegie Council Program in Justice and the World Economy.

    Register online at: http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/event/19703

    07:00 PM - 08:30 PM
    B115 – The Observatory Building
    315 Bloor Street West

  • Wed, Jan 27, 2016
    Events on Campus
    Debating Skills Workshop with Teddy Harrison

    The Ethics, Society & Law Students’ Association is excited to be hosting its first workshop of the year led by special guest, Teddy Harrison. All are welcome! Refreshments will be served and no registration is necessary.

    Teddy Harrison is a PhD student in political science with experience in competitive debating. He is a two-time Winter Carnival champion, North American finalist and Canadian British Parliamentary National Finalist. He is also the convenor of the 2007-8 World University Debating Championship and has extensive experience in coaching and teaching debating workshops.

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Jan 27, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Andrew Sepielli

    On the Genealogy of NihilismAndrew Sepielli

    Andrew Sepielli
    Department of Philosophy
    University of Toronto-Mississauga

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Jan 20, 2016
    Public Issues Forum
    Public Issues Forum: Resource Development and Indigenous Peoples

    Resource Development and Indigenous Peoples

    The panelists are:
    Douglas Sanderson, Faculty of Law, UofT
    Rauna Kuokkanen, Departments of Aboriginal Studies and Political Science, UofT
    David Parker, CIRDI Vancouver
    The Hon. Bob Rae, Lawyer, Political Leader, and Advisor to the Matawa Chiefs Tribal Council

    Moderators:
    Stephen Toope, Director, Munk School of Global Affairs
    Peggy Kohn, Acting Director, Centre for Ethics

    Co-sponsored by:
    Munk School of Global Affairs
    Ethics, Society and Law Program, Trinity College
    Centre for Aboriginal Initiatives

    Please register online at: http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/event/19670

    Indigenous Peoples & Resource Development
    Indigenous Peoples and Resource Development

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Jan 15, 2016
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk – Charles Mills

    Charles MillsRacial Equality

    Charles W. Mills
    John Evans Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy
    Northwestern University

    02:00 PM - 04:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Jan 15, 2016
    Perspectives on Ethics, Events on Campus
    Under-represented Philosophy Panel Discussion with Charles W. Mills

    Academic Philosophy and the Question of Diversity: Perspectives on a Strange Uniformity
    Panelists:
    Zara Bain, PhD candidate, University of Bristol & Cardiff
    Shyam Ranganathan, Department of Philosophy, York University
    Frank Cunningham, Departments of Philosophy and Political Science (Emeritus)

    Clinton Debogorski, PhD candidate and President of Under-represented Philosophy

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Jan 13, 2016
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Mara Marin

    Mara Marin Poster
    What Domination Can and Cannot Do.
    Gender Oppression and the Limits of the Notion of Domination

    Mara Marin
    Go-In Post-doctoral Fellow, Exzellenzcluster Normative Orders, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt
    Visiting Scholar, Centre for Ethics

    12:00 PM - 01:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Dec 11, 2015
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    TBD

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Dec 9, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Clifton Mark

    Dignity as an Egalitarian ValueClifton Mark

    Clifton Mark
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Dec 4, 2015
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Igor Shoikhedbrod: “The Ontology of Social Being and the Normative Argument for Legality: Marx, Lukacs and Beyond

    Discussant: Dr. Alan Brudner (Emeritus Professor, Faculty of Law and Political Science 

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 27, 2015
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    David Polansky: “The Peuple as nation or political community?”

    Discussant: TBD

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 25, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Lauren Bialystok

    “My Child, My Choice”?Lauren Bialystok

    Lauren Bialystok
    Assistant Professor
    Department of Social Justice Education
    OISE, University of Toronto

    This talk deals with parental dissent in the public education system in Ontario.

     

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Nov 19, 2015
    Events on Campus
    Community Research Partnership in Ethics Workshop

    CRPE program workshop

    Thursday, November 19, 2015.

    Each student will be given the opportunity to present initial findings and hypotheses as well as future research directions.

    CRPE Nov Workshop Agenda

    10:00 AM - 01:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 16, 2015
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk – Iwao Hirose

    The disvalue of death and its temporal location
    Iwao Hirose
    Iwao Hirose
    Department of Philosophy
    McGill University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 13, 2015
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Jaby Mathew: “TBD”

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 11, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Noya Rimalt

    When Rights Don’t Talk: Abortion Law and the Politics of Compromise
    Noya Rimalt
    Noya Rimalt
    Law, University of Haifa

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 6, 2015
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Matt Hamilton: “Movement Thought: Aesthetics and Politics

    Discussant: TBD

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 4, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Lukas Meyer

    Legitimate Expectations and Climate EthicsLukasMeyer Poster

    Lukas Meyer
    Universität Graz
    Institut für Philosophie
    Austria

    http://dk-climate-change.uni-graz.at/

    http://www.uni-graz.at/lukas.meyer/index.php/home

    Event co-sponsored by Trinity College’s Ethics, Society and Law Students Association

     

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 2, 2015
    Perspectives on Ethics
    CANCELLED – Seminar Talk – Bonnie Honig

    What kind of thing is land? Hannah Arendt’s object relations

    Bonnie Honig
    Professor of Modern Culture and Media
    Brown University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Oct 29, 2015
    Public Issues Forum
    Public Issues Forum: Sex Education Curriculum and Controversy

    Sex Education_Page_2Perspectives from academic experts and community leaders

    • David Rayside, Professor Emeritus (UT), Political Science, former Director of the Mark Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, Activist
    • Kathy Bickmore, Professor, Curriculum Studies (OISE/UT)
    • Rabea Murtaza, Founder of Muslims for Ontario’s Health and Physical Education Curriculum
    • Lauren Bialystok, Assistant Professor, Department of Social Justice Education, OISE, University of Toronto, and Visiting Scholar at the Centre for Ethics

    NEXUS LOUNGE, 12th floor,
    OISE, 252 Bloor Street West (wheelchair accessible)

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
    252 Bloor Street West

  • Wed, Oct 28, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Avigail Ferdman

    You Can’t Have it Both Ways: Contemporary Liberalism and ‘Either/Or’ Decisions

    Avigail Ferdman
    Hebrew University of Jerusalem, School of Public Policy
    Visiting Scholar, Centre for Ethics (2015-16)

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Oct 26, 2015
    Author Meets Critics
    Book Launch

    Immigration Detention: The Migration of a Policy and Its Human Impact
    Routledge, 2015
    Edited by Amy Nethery, Stephanie Silvermanimmigration detention

    Panelists:
    Joseph Carens, Political Science, UofT
    Barbara Jackman, Faculty of Law, UofT
    Cetta Mainwaring (Waterloo)
    Co-sponsored by:
    Canadian Association for Refugee and Forced Migration Studies (CARFMS)
    02:00 PM - 04:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 23, 2015
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Dorina Verli: “Rousseau’s Theory of Justice and the State as Democratic Assembly

    Discussant: Scott Dodds

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Oct 19, 2015
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk – David Miller

    The Duty to Rescue Boat People

    David Miller
    Professor of Political Theory
    Nuffield College, Oxford

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 16, 2015
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    TBD

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 9, 2015
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Dan Schillinger: “Aristotle on Luck, Character and Politics

    Discussant: Dr. Laura Rabinowitz

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Oct 8, 2015
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk – Anne Phillips

    The Politics of the Human

    Anne Phillips
    London School of Economics and Political Science

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Oct 7, 2015
    Events on Campus
    Law, Urbanity & Justice Research Group

    Law, Urbanity & Justice

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 2, 2015
    Events on Campus
    Religion and citizenship in a post-secular society

    Symposium sponsored by:
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    The Institute for Studies in Global Prosperity
    Centre for Philosophy, Religion, and Social Ethics, Institute for Christian Studies
    Trudeau Foundation

    Symposium

    Speakers:
    Prof. Simone Chambers (University of California)
    Prof. Phil Triadafilopoulos (University of Toronto)
    Prof. Ronald A. Kuipers (Institute for Christian Studies)
    Prof. Ingrid Mattson (University of Western Ontario)
    Prof. Howard Adelman (York University)
    Dr. Mary Jo Leddy (Regis College; Romero House)
    Dr. Benjamin Schewel (University of Virginia)

    ReligionandCitizenship-DraftProgram-Sept152015

    Keynote lecture:
    Prof Armando Salvatore (McGill University)
    Religion, citizenship, and the challenge of transnationalism: Historical roots, convergences and divergences

    Seating is limited, please register

    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Sep 30, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – John Bishop

    JohnBishop PosterCorporate involvement in the creation of global sustainability norms: a theoretical perspective

    John Bishop
    Professor, Business Administration Program
    Trent University
    Peterborough, ON

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Sep 21, 2015
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Panel Discussion "The Ethics of Immigration"

    The Ethics of Immigration

    Joseph Carens
    Department of Political Science

    Panelists:
    Ronald Beiner (Political Science)
    Stephanie Silverman (SSHRC, post-doc)
    Audrey Macklin (Law)

    For more information: Global Migration Research Institute interview with Joseph Carens

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Sep 16, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Anna Su

    Government Involvement in Reforming Religions

    Anna Su
    Faculty of Law, University of Toronto

    Anna Su’s primary areas of research include the law and history of international human rights law, U.S. constitutional law (First Amendment), and law and religion. Her research has appeared in the Vanderbilt Law Review, the International Journal of Constitutional Law and the Journal of the History of International Law.

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Jun 24, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Jörn Lamla

    Governing Privacy by Digital Reterritorialization and the Reconfiguration of Democracy

    Jörn Lamla, Department of Scociology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Kassel. His research interests include social theory, the relation of consumer society and democracy, citizenship and issues of privacy in the digital world.

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Apr 30, 2015
    Events on Campus
    15th Annual Philosophy Graduate Conference

    Grad Conference

    Perspectives on the First Person

     

    09:30 AM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Apr 24, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Robyn Sampson Ethics at Noon

    “Embodied Borders: The Ethical Dilemmas of Alternatives to Immigration Detention”

    Robyn Sampson
    Research Fellow
    Swinburne Institute for Social Research in Melbourne, Australia

    Abstract: This paper will analyse subtle yet significant developments in state bordering practices identified during work into alternatives to immigration detention and consider the ethical implications of these developments. Robyn draws attention to an emerging practice in Australia, Belgium and Hong Kong in which immigration detention is no longer solely a site of confinement but is also interpreted as a legal status which permits the individual migrant to reside in the community with freedom of movement while a migration issue is resolved. Through this status, she argue, individuals carry the border with them into the community of the nation. Sampson proposes the term embodied borders to encapsulate this (re)location of the border on to the bodies of migrants who are physically present but legally absent from the territory. She contends that the regulated use of this official non-presence highlights a departure from the traditional territory-sovereignty nexus. Further, such bordering policies, while exclusionary, do not result in a homogenous form of exception produced by sovereign authority alone. Rather, bordering involves dynamic and responsive forms of differentiation being lawfully produced and enacted in specific contexts by multiple actors. Such developments introduce new ethical dilemmas in the area of migration.
    Dr Robyn Sampson is a Research Fellow at the Swinburne Institute for Social Research in Melbourne, Australia. Dr Sampson has a long-standing interest in issues of migration management, border control and forced migration. She is most well known for her research on alternatives to immigration detention, which was conducted in collaboration with the International Detention Coalition. That research has now been presented to over 50 countries and used by several governments, including Japan, Thailand, the Netherlands, Mexico and the United States, to develop alternatives to detention in their context. She has previously conducted research on the settlement of refugee youth in Australia, the impacts of long-term immigration detention post-release, and the deportation of refused asylum seekers who are seriously ill. Dr Sampson holds a PhD in Politics from La Trobe University.

     

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Apr 23, 2015
    Public Lectures
    Public Lecture – William Smith

    William SmithDemocratic Disruptions: Towards a Deliberative Theory of Direct Action

    William Smith
    Department of Government & Public Administration
    The Chinese University of Hong Kong

    Abstract

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Apr 20, 2015

    Annual Ethics Conference with CREUM

    Rencontre Montréal - Toronto

    In Montreal

    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM


  • Wed, Apr 15, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon with David Horst

    David HorstDavid Horst
    Visiting Scholar, Centre for Ethics
    The Martin Buber Society of Fellows
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    12:00 PM - 01:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Apr 13, 2015
    Public Lectures
    Public Lecture – Thomas Hurka

    Thomas HurkaMore Seriously Wrong

    Thomas Hurka
    Department of Philosophy, University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 30, 2015
    Public Issues Forum
    Physician Assisted Death: Where do we go from here?

    The Supreme Court of Canada has struck down the laws prohibiting physician-assisted Physician Assisted Deathdeath but has only partially defined the kind of legal regime that might replace them. This panel, consisting of a philosopher, a lawyer, and a clinician, will confront some of the questions that will now be very much on the public agenda: What, exactly, did the Court decide? What directions did it lay out for a regime of legal assisted dying? What is the federal government’s task now? What happens if it does nothing? Where might we look for guidance on how to construct a suitable regulatory framework? What criteria and procedures should it embody? What impact might the provision of legal assisted dying have on the practice of medicine, especially palliative care? How might we protect physicians’ right of conscientious refusal to provide this service?

    Panelists include:
    Wayne Sumner, University Professor Emeritus, Department of Philosophy, and author of Assisted Death: A Study in Ethics and Law
    James Downar, Palliative Care Physician and Intensivist, University Health Network; Assistant Professor, Divisions of Critical Care and Palliative Care, University of Toronto; Chair, Postgraduate Education Committee, Canadian Society of Palliative Care Physicians
    Jocelyn Downie, Professor, Faculties of Law and Medicine, Dalhousie University. Author of Dying Justice: A Case for Decriminalizing Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide in Canada ; member of pro bono legal team in Carter v. Canada (Attorney General) and member of Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel on End of Life Decision-Making

    Seating is Limited – Register here:

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    George Ignatieff Theatre, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 25, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon: Blain Neufeld

    “Citizenship Education, Religious Communities, and Non-Domination”

    Blain NeufeldBlain Neufeld
    Associate Professor
    Department of Philosophy
    University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee

    Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 9, 2015
    Perspectives on Ethics
    POSTPONED – Seminar Talk: Bonnie Honig

    What kind of a thing is Land? Hannah Arendt’s Object Relations

    Bonnie Honig
    Professor of Modern Culture and Media and Political Science
    Brown University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Sat, Mar 7, 2015
    Events on Campus
    Graduate Associates – Annual Conference

    Keynote speaker:
    Professor Saba Mahmood, University of Berkeley
    Minority Rights and Religious Freedom: Itineraries of Conversion?Unity and Resistance

    6:15 pm – Koffler House, 569 Spadina Avenue

    To register for Keynote:

    For more information:

    09:30 AM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 6, 2015
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop 02:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Solarium, Faculty of Law
    84 Queen's Park, Falconer Hall

  • Fri, Mar 6, 2015

    Legal Theory Workshop

    Bernadette Atuahene. She works on land restitution in South Africa.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/16/opinion/south-africas-land-inequity.

    http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-atuahene-mandela-land-south-africa-20141207-story.html

    12:30 PM - 01:45 PM
    Solarium, Faculty of Law
    84 Queen's Park, Falconer Hall

  • Tue, Mar 3, 2015
    Public Lectures
    Is the Government Fiscally Blind? An Empirical Examination of the Effect of the Compensation Requirement on Eminent Domain Exercises

    Ronit Levine-SchnurRonitLevineSchnur
    Visiting Scholar
    Faculty of Law
    Postdoctoral Fellow
    Centre for Ethics & Munk School of Global Affairs
    University of Toronto

    Ronit Levine-Schnur is Visiting Scholar at the Faculty of Law. She is also a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Centre for Ethics and Munk School of Global Affairs. She is the recipient of the 2014-15 Halbert Exchange Post-Doctoral Award, the Arie Shachar Post-Doctoral Fellowship in Canadian Studies and the Rothschild Post-Doctoral Award. Her research focuses on property and contract law and theory, with particular emphasis on land ownership.

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 2, 2015
    Public Issues Forum
    Toronto and the Natural City: Facing our Ecological Future

    Natural City Public Issues Forum PosterAbstract

    Panelists include:

    David Miller, President & CEO, World Wildlife Fund Canada; Former Mayor, City of Toronto (Moderator)

    Professor Roger Kiel, Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University

    Professor Pamela Robinson, School of Urban and Regional Planning, Ryerson University

    Olivia Chow, Former Member of Parliament and Toronto City Councillor, and

    Professor Stephen Bede Scharper, School of the Environment, University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    George Ignatieff Theatre, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Sat, Feb 28, 2015

    Just War Theory Workshop, Jindal Global University

    http://www.stockholmcentre.org/delhi-workshop-on-the-analytic-just-war.html

    09:30 PM - 05:00 PM


  • Thu, Feb 26, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon: Teresa Bejan

    Ethics at Noon - Teresa Bejan“Evangelical Toleration”

    Teresa Bejan
    Department of Political Science

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Feb 23, 2015
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk: Sally Simpson

    Sally SimpsonWhite Collar Crime

    Sally Simpson
    Professor
    Director C-BERC
    Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice
    University of Maryland

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Feb 5, 2015
    Public Issues Forum
    Event Postponed

    Public Issues Forum – Adscam: Ten Years Later

    (February 5, 2015)

    Mel Cappe, School of Public Policy and Government, U of T
    Andrew Stark, Rotman School of Management and Department of Political Science, U of T

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Feb 4, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon: François Tanguay-Renaud

    To Fill or Not to Fill Individual Responsibility Gaps?

    Prof. François Tanguay-Renaud, LLB, BCL, DPhil
    Director, Nathanson Centre on Transnational Human Rights, Crime and Security
    Director, Combined JD/MA Program in Law and Philosophy
    Coordinator, International Initiatives

    Osgoode Hall Law School, York University
    www.osgoode.yorku.ca
    nathanson.osgoode.yorku.ca

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Jan 30, 2015
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop 02:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Jan 21, 2015
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon: Waheed Hussain

    Dog Eat Dog: Morality, Social Institutions and Rivalry

    Waheed Hussain
    Department of Philosophy
    University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Jan 19, 2015
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk: William E. Scheuerman

    Edward Snowden’s Lessons: Against the Anti-Legal Turn in Theories of Civil Disobedience

    William E. Scheuerman
    University of Indiana Bloomington

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Dec 10, 2014
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon: Andrew Franklin-Hall

    Andrew Franklin-Hall
    Department of Philosophy, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 28, 2014
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop 02:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 26, 2014
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon: François Tanguay-Renaud

    State Crimes

    Prof. François Tanguay-Renaud, LLB, BCL, DPhil

    Director, Nathanson Centre on Transnational Human Rights, Crime and Security
    Director, Combined JD/MA Program in Law and Philosophy
    Coordinator, International Initiatives

    Osgoode Hall Law School, York University

    www.osgoode.yorku.ca
    nathanson.osgoode.yorku.ca

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 24, 2014
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk: Iwao Hirose

    The Value of a Statistical Life

    Iwao Hirose
    Department of Philosophy
    McGill University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 12, 2014
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon: Darryl Robinson

    The Justice of International Criminal Justice

    Darryl Robinson
    Associate Professor
    Queen’s University Faculty of Law

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 10, 2014
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk: David Estlund

    The Puzzle of Plural Obligation

    David Estlund
    Department of Philosophy
    Brown University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 7, 2014
    Book Workshop
    Why Law Matters by Alon Harel – Book Symposium –

    Why Law Matters AHarelWhy Law Matters

    Co-sponsored by the Jerusalem Review of Legal Studies

    Alon Harel
    Mizock Professor of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    Christopher Essert
    Faculty of Law, Queen’s University

    David Estlund
    Department of Philosophy, Brown

    Arthur Ripstein
    Faculty of Law and Department of Philosophy, U of T

    Assaf Sharon
    Tel Aviv University

    Link to the OUP Website for the reading of the introduction and some of the first chapter of the book: http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199643271.do

    09:30 AM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 3, 2014
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk: Eric Nelson

    The Bargain Basis: Rawls, Anti-Pelagianism and Moral Arbitrariness

    Eric Nelson
    Professor of Government
    Harvard University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 31, 2014
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop 02:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Oct 29, 2014
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon: Ronit Levine-Schnur

    Equality in Land Use Law

    Ronit Levine-Schnur
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Faculty of Law/Centre for Ethics

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Oct 27, 2014
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk: Rajeev Bhargava

    Forms of Restraint and Religious Coexistence in Ancient Indian Political Thought

    Rajeev Bhargava
    Director, Centre for the Study of Developing Societies
    New Delhi University

    Event co-sponsored by the Centre for South Asian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Oct 15, 2014
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon: Julian Culp

    Global Justice & Publicity

    Julian Culp
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics
    Course Instructor ETH201Contemporary Moral Problems and ETH210 Rationality and Action

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Oct 9, 2014
    Public Lectures
    Seth Lazar, Australian National University

    In Dubious Battle: Uncertainty and the Ethics of Killing

    Seth Lazar
    Australian National University

    Abstract:

    03:15 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Oct 6, 2014
    Perspectives on Ethics
    CANCELLED – Seminar Talk: Val Napoleon

    One Way: An Indigenous Legal Research Methodology

    Val Napoleon
    Faculty of Law
    University of Victoria

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 3, 2014
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop 02:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Oct 1, 2014
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon: Blain Neufeld

    Freedom, Money, and Justice as Fairness

    Blain Neufeld
    Department of Philosophy, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and
    Visiting Professor, 2014-15, Centre for Ethics

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Sep 24, 2014
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon: Christoph Lumer

    Constructing Morals and the Aim of Morality

    Dr. Christoph Lumer
    Professor of Moral Philosophy, University of Siena (Italy)
    Home 1:
    Website:

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Sep 15, 2014
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Seminar Talk: Kenan Malik

    What can the history of morality tell us about the nature of morality?

    Kenan Malik
    Writer, lecturer and broadcaster

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Sep 11, 2014
    Public Lectures
    Public Lecture – Judith Lichtenberg

    Comparing the Moral Weight of Global versus Domestic Poverty

    Judith Lichtenberg
    Department of Philosophy
    Georgetown University

    Abstract

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Jun 6, 2014
    Book Workshop
    Julius Workshop

    Alexander Julius

    Niko Kolodny

    Véronique Munoz-Darde

    Louis-Philippe Hodgson, York University

    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, May 9, 2014
    Events on Campus
    Maxims and MRIs: Kantian Ethics and Empirical Psychology

    Conference: May 9 – May 10, 2014

    Jeanette Kennett, Macquarie University
    Susan Dwyer, University of Maryland
    Patrick Frierson, Witman College
    Pauline Kleingeld, University of Groningen
    Hanno Sauer, Tilburg University
    Tom Bates, University of Groningen
    Marijana Milosavljevic-Vujosevic, University of Groningen
    Joseph Heath, University of Toronto

    M&M program

    Kant Papers

    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, May 6, 2014

    Book Manuscript Workshop

    Civil Law and Civil Sovereignty
    Roman Law and the Doctrine of Popular Sovereignty in Early Modern Constitutional Thought

    Daniel Lee
    University of Toronto

    Commentators
    David Dyzenhaus
    University of Toronto

    Kenneth Pennington
    Catholic University of America
    Tuesday, May 6, 2014
    10AM – 2PM
    Department of Political Science
    Sidney Smith Hall 3130
    100 St. George St.
    Lunch will be served

    Chapters will be posted online: politics.utoronto.ca/politicaltheoryworkshop

    10:00 AM - 02:00 PM
    Room 3130, Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George St.

  • Thu, May 1, 2014
    Events on Campus
    Normativity: 2014 Graduate Conference in Philosophy

    May 1 – May 2, 2014

    Keynote Speakers:
    Anandi Hattiangadi, St. Hilda’s College, Oxford University
    J. David Velleman, Department of Philosophy, New York University

    Co-Sponsors:
    School of Graduate Studies, UofT
    Graduate Students’ Union, UofT

    Conference Schedule (as of April 7)

    http://www.philosophy.utoronto.ca/news/2014-u-of-t-grad-conference/

    10:00 AM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Apr 25, 2014
    Events on Campus
    Graduate Associates: 2014 Conference

    Second Annual Centre for Ethics Graduate Conference

    April 25-26, 2014

    More Information

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Apr 22, 2014

    Human Rights, Refugees and Freedom of Movement

    David Owen
    Professor, School of Social Sciences
    University of Southampton

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Apr 17, 2014

    Book Launch (by invitation only)

    Enlightenment 2.0
    Restoring Sanity to our Politics, our Economy, and our Lives

    Joseph Heath
    Professor, Department of Philosophy
    Director, Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    05:00 PM - 07:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Apr 10, 2014
    Events on Campus
    Centre de Recherche en Éthique de l'Université de Montréal (CRÉUM) Forum

    Atelier conjoint 2014.04.10.CREUM-01
    avec le Centre de recherche en éthique de l’Université de Montréal
    et le Centre for Ethics de l’Université de Toronto

    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Apr 4, 2014
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    CANCELLED – Political Theory Workshop

    Why is the City-in-speech of Plato’s Laws Second Best?

    Presenter: Rob Ballingall

    Workshop Calendar

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 31, 2014
    Perspectives on Ethics
    The Moral Significance of Shareholders

    Alan Strudler
    Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics
    Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 28, 2014

    Community Research Partnerships in Ethics Conference

    John Duncan (http://utoronto.academia.edu/JohnDuncan)

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 26, 2014
    Events on Campus
    Philosophers for Peace

    Building Bridges Versus Walls:
    Violence, Conflict & International Intervention

    Timea Spitka
    PhD, Ben Gurion University, Bersheeba, Israel

    04:15 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 418, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Wed, Mar 26, 2014

    Cancelled – Ethics at Noon

    Truth, Lies and Controversy in Private Law (The Normative Structure of Estoppel)

    Larissa Katz
    Faculty of Law
    University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 21, 2014
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop

    Aristotle on Luck

    Presenter: Daniel Schillinger

    Workshop Calendar

     

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Mar 20, 2014
    Events on Campus
    “Fair or Unfair?: A Discussion of proposed changes to the Electoral Act”

    To be held at the Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto on Thursday, March 20th 2014 from 1 to 3 pm.

    Peter Loewen, Melissa Williams and Nelson Wiseman will be speaking to the issue.

    01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 17, 2014
    Perspectives on Ethics
    The Surprising Platonism of Hannah Arendt

    Patchen Markell
    Political Science
    University of Chicago

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 14, 2014
    Events on Campus
    The Value of Equality (Day 2)

    EqualityProgram

    08:30 AM - 05:30 PM
    Combination Room
    Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue

  • Thu, Mar 13, 2014
    Events on Campus
    The Value of Equality Workshop

     

    “Basic Equality, Consequentialism, and Priority
    Richard J. Arneson, San Diego

    “Rationality, Equal Status, and Egalitarianism”
    Thomas Christiano, Arizona

    “Inequality in Political Philosophy and in Epidemiology: A Re-Marriage”
    Nir Eyal, Harvard

    “Could Equality (or Priority) Be Intrinsically Valuable?”
    Daniel M. Hausman, Madison Wisconsin

    “Two Faces of Equality”
    Deborah Hellman, Virginia

    “Equality in the Law: What Kind of Value does Non-Discrimination Have?”
    Sophia Moreau, Toronto

    “Rescuing the Pareto Argument”
    Cynthia Stark, Utah

    “Illuminating Egalitarianism”
    Larry S. Temkin, Rutgers

    “Paretian Egalitarianism and Transitivity”
    Peter Vallentyne, Columbia-Missouri (with Bertil Tungodden, Norwegian School of Economics)

    Joseph Heath, Toronto
    Shlomi Segall, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Visiting Fellow at the Centre for Ethics)

    EqualityProgram

    Equality Papers

    02:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 7, 2014
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop

    Title: TBD

    Presenter: Steve Trochimchuk

    Workshop Calendar

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Feb 28, 2014
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop

    Rousseau’s Account of the Genevan Republic

    Presenter: Dorina Verli

    Workshop Calendar

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Feb 26, 2014
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon – Theresa Enright

    “The Right to Mobility: Mass Urban Transit and Socio-Spatial Justice”

    Theresa Enright
    Department of Political Science
    University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Feb 14, 2014
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop

    Self-Knowledge, Morality and the Problem of Punishment in Friedrich Nietzsche’s Daybreak
    Tom Meredith

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Feb 7, 2014
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    CANCELLED – Political Theory Workshop

    Homer’s Iliad and Political Theory: On Books 1-9 of the Iliad

    Presenter: Andrew Gross
    Discussant:Cliff Orwin

    Workshop Calendar

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Jan 24, 2014
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop

    Title: TBD

    Presenter: Cameron Sabadoz

    Workshop Calendar

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Jan 20, 2014
    Perspectives on Ethics
    On Valuing Moral Disagreement

    David Wong 2014.01.20 - David Wong
    Susan Fox Beischer & George D. Beischer Professor of Philosophy
    Duke University

    Abstract:

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Jan 17, 2014
    Events on Campus
    Contentious Politics in Egypt and Tunisia

    Matthew J. Gordner, M.A.
    PhD Student
    University of Toronto
    Department of Political Science

    http://politics.utoronto.ca

    Trudeau Scholar
    The Trudeau Foundation

    http://www.trudeaufoundation.ca/en

    Founder and Executive Director
    The Peace by Piece Initiative
    www.thepeacebypieceinitiative.com 

    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Jan 13, 2014
    Perspectives on Ethics, Ethics and the Public Interest
    Democracy without the Consent of the Governed

    Arthur Applbaum 2014.01.13 - Arthur Applbaum
    Adams Professor of Political Leadership and Democratic Values
    Professor of Ethics and Public Policy
    Harvard Kennedy School

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Jan 10, 2014
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop

    Difference, Critique, and Aesthetics

    Presenter: Matthew Hamilton

    Workshop Calendar

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Dec 10, 2013
    Events on Campus
    Annual Community Research Partnership in Ethics (CRPE) Conference

    John Duncan
    Director
    Ethics, Society and Law Program
    Trinity College
    (http://utoronto.academia.edu/JohnDuncan)

    01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Dec 6, 2013
    Book Workshop
    A.J. Julius

    EVENT POSTPONED

    Alexander J. Julius
    Department of Philosophy
    University of California, Los Angeles

    Niko Kolodny, Berkeley
    Véronique Munoz-Dardé, Berkeley
    Arthur Ripstein, Toronto
    Louis-Philippe Hodgson, York
    (registration required)

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 29, 2013
    Events on Campus, Book Workshop
    A Political Theory of Territory

    A manuscript workshop on A Political Theory of Territory by Margaret Moore (Queens University)

    Panelists:
    Margaret (Peggy) Kohn, Department of Political Science, U of T
    Loren King, Department of Political Science, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo
    Daniel Weinstock, McGill University

    Participants are expected to read Chapter 3. If you would like a link to this chapter, please contact ethics@utoronto.ca

    Table of Contents

    1. Why We Need a Theory of Territory. This is intended to be a non-technical, motivating introduction, which explains the relationship of territory to a number of pressing questions, including border disputes, secession, immigration, and global justice.

    2. What is Territory? This is a conceptual chapter, which explains in some detail what territory is; what rights are included in territorial rights; what is the relationship between territory and cognate notions, such as property; and also sets out what we expect a theory of territory to do.

    3. Foundations of a Theory of Territory: Individual Rights of Occupancy and Collective Rights of Self-determination. This is a foundational chapter, which sets out my theory of territory.  It aims to achieve three things: 1. defends moral right of occupancy (and what it means to ‘occupy’ a land ‘not unjustly’); 2. explains the conditions under which individuals form a people with claims to self-determination; and 3. explains why collective self-determination is valuable.

    4. Culturalist theories of territory. There are two rival theories of territory and the fundamental holder of territorial rights: statist theories and culturalist theories.  This chapter examines culturalist theories, with a focus on David Miller’s and Avery Kolers’ theories respectively.

    5. Statist/Functional Theories of territory. This chapter examines statist theories of territory, beginning with Kant, but also including Sidgwick, and encompassing contemporary accounts, such as Lea Ypi, Allen Buchanan, Jeremy Waldron, Anna Stilz, Cara Nine. These two chapters (3&4) are important because they are designed to show that the principal rivals have problems that are avoided in my theory.

    6. Heartlands, Contested Lands and Drawing Boundaries. Here I address questions about the physical extent of territory. This allows me to talk about cases which are of pressing contemporary importance, such as those involving boundary disputes between neighbouring states, claims of uninhabited islands, the seabed, the ocean generally, and the territorial claims of secessionists.

    7. Expulsions from Land and Corrective Justice. This chapter addresses the problem of territorial injustice.  Most people are settled on land which was previously occupied by another group, which might also make a claim to the same land (on historical grounds).  This chapter deals with how we should think about expulsions from territory and what corrective justice remedies are available and when they are appropriate (or superseded).

    8. Territorial Rights to Resources and Claims to Global Justice. This chapter, and the following two, deals with what are regarded as distinct rights over territory. Any theory of territory should have something to say about various sorts of territorial claims that are often associated with having ‘territorial rights’.  I disaggregate these claims and consider the extent to which the argument advanced above – in chapters 1-6 — have a bearing on the kind and extent of claims that are made to control borders or over natural resources or defensive rights.

    9. Self-determination and the Right to Exclude: Territorial Rights over Immigration. This chapter considers the implications of the argument advanced above for control over the flow of people and goods across borders (which is commonly associated with having sovereignty over a territory).

    10. National Defensive Rights. This chapter shows that the theory of territory developed in the chapters above can justify a right to national self-defence.  It is now widely accepted that much of the support in the popular imagination for defensive rights to war is based on an untenable reduction to individual self-defence or false analogy between individual self-defence and collective (or national) self-defence.  One of the ways in which this analogy does not work is that a defensive war is typically thought to be triggered by an attack on the territory of the state, even when no people would be killed if the defending state simply accepts the loss of territory.  The aggressor state, in other words, does not necessarily pose a lethal threat to people as it advances through (unpopulated) territory. This chapter explains and justifies defensive rights over territory.

    02:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 29, 2013
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop

    The Democratic Continuum: Edified Beasts and Political Animals

    Presenter: Emma Planinc

    Workshop Calendar

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Nov 28, 2013
    Events on Campus
    Ethics, Society and Law Students' Association Academic Seminar

    End-of-Life Care: Ethics and the Law

    The Ethics, Society, and Law Student’s Association are pleased to present our Fall Academic Seminar; End-of-Life Care: Ethics and the Law, with guest lecturer Wayne Sumner.

    If you are attending, please RSVP by sending us an email at:
    utethicssocietyandlaw@gmail.com

    01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 27, 2013
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon

    There’s no Bathing in the River Styx: The problem of Rule-Manipulation in Adversarial and Non-Adversarial Schemes

    Dominic Martin
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 18, 2013
    Perspectives on Ethics, Ethics and the Public Interest
    The Canadian One Percent

    Stephen Gordon 2013.11.18 - Stephen Gordon
    Department of Economics, Université Laval

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 15, 2013
    Events on Campus
    Judging Stories

    Noah Benjamin Novogrodsky
    Professor of Law
    University of Wyoming College of Law

    “Judging Stories” concerns the case of Mugesera v. Citizenship & Immigration (Canada) which I intervened in as the director of the International Human Rights Program at the Faculty of Law.  The ethical element of the story involved the anti-Semitic conduct of Mugesera’s lawyer — Guy Bertrand — who alleged that the Canadian Supreme Court was captive to a Jewish conspiracy and incompetent to hear the matter.

    The paper uses the Mugesera odyssey to address the emerging global treatment of hate speech and incitement to genocide.

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 248, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 15, 2013
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop

    Sophists, Statesmen, and the Philosopher: On the Problem of Political Authority in the Preface to Hegel’s Philosophy of Right

    Presenter: Jonas Schwab-Pflug
    Discussant: Ronnie Beiner

    Workshop Calendar

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 13, 2013
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon

    The For-Profit Misnomer in Canadian Corporate Law

    Carol Liao 2013.11.13 - Carol Liao
    PhD (UBC) / SJD (Toronto) (Joint Program); Law

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 6, 2013
    Events on Campus
    Banning Religious Clothing? The Quebec Charter of Secular Values: What’s It All About?

    5:30 pm – 7 pm
    Wednesday, November 6

    U of T Multi-Faith Centre
    596 Spadina Avenue, Room KP 113 (1st Floor)

    Join Prof. Benjamin Berger, Osgoode Law School, Prof. Ruth Marshall, Study of Religion, U of T, Prof. Simone Chambers, Pol. Sci., U of T, Ayesha Valliani, Grad Student, Study of Religion, U of T in a moderated discussion of the Quebec Charter of Values with Prof. Pamela Klassen, Director, Religion in the Public Sphere programme, U of T.

    Explore issues of state neutrality and religious accommodation vis a vis the proposed legislation of the Quebec’s Charter of Values. The proposed Charter includes banning public sector workers, including teachers and all civil servants from wearing “ostentatious” religious symbols. This includes: hijabs, turbans, and large crosses.

    https://www.facebook.com/events/230035077155696/

    05:30 PM - 07:00 PM
    Multi-Faith Centre
    569 Spadina Avenue

  • Mon, Nov 4, 2013
    Perspectives on Ethics
    From Now and to Eternity: Prioritarianism and Time

    Shlomi Segall 2013.11.04 - Shlomi Segall
    The Political Science Department and PPE
    The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    NB: Date corrected

    Abstract:

    What is the temporal unit of prioritarianism? The paper argues against complete-life prioritarianism and in favor of priority to those who are worse off at any given time-slice. With regard to equality, in contrast, we must adopt the opposite position, namely, we must be concerned with, and only with, complete lives. I propose to search for the temporal unit of prioritarianism by outlining five distinguishing features of the view (not meant as an exhaustive list). Prioritarianism is: an other-things-being-equal, non-comparative view that is concerned with aggregating an impersonal value that applies both inter-personally as well as intra-personally. I shall then assess the implications of these five features for time. I will attempt to show that prioritarianism cannot apply to anything longer than time slices. The paper concludes, however, that the implications of priority and time are no objection to prioritarianism, but that they do constitute an objection to what one might term anti-egalitarian prioritarianism. We ought, in sum, be prioritarians about time-slices, and egalitarians about complete lives.

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Oct 30, 2013
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon

    Empathy and Political Preferences 2013.10.30 - Peter Loewen

    Peter Loewen
    Director, Centre for the Study of the United States
    Department of Political Science, UofT-Mississauga

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 25, 2013
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop

    Virtue, Disagreement, and Skepticism in Montaigne and Zhuangzi

    Presenter: Lincoln Rathnam

    Workshop Calendar

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Oct 17, 2013
    Events on Campus
    Workshop: Practice of Ethics in Translation/Gandhi

    Ethics in Translation with Richard Sorabji:
    A Workshop for Graduate Students and Faculty

    Led by: Professor Richard Sorabji, Wolfson College, Oxford

    This half-day workshop will be based on Professor Sorabji’s book, Gandhi and the Stoics, accompanied by selected texts by Gandhi and the Stoic thinkers addressed in the book.  In addition to exploring the substantive themes of the volume by reading across texts, the workshop will also address the practice of bringing thinkers from radically different times and locations into conversation with one another.

    Registration:

    The workshop is open to graduate students and faculty at the University of Toronto; others may address a request to participate to Melissa Williams (melissa.williams@utoronto.ca). 

    Pre-registration is required. To register, please visit http://ethics-utoronto-ca.eventbrite.ca/.

    Preparation:

    All participants should have a copy of Gandhi and the Stoics, and should have read the book well in advance of the workshop. (The UofT Bookstore is offering a special discount to workshop participants of 20% off the $35.00 cover price.  They are expecting a special shipment of the book in the first week of October. To purchase a discounted copy, go to the Information Desk on the 2nd floor of the bookstore, where copies will be set aside for workshop participants.) 

    Other readings will be posted on a website dedicated to the workshop, and information about access to the website will be circulated to registered participants.

    Webpage

    09:00 AM - 12:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Oct 16, 2013
    Events on Campus
    Panel: Translations of Freedom: Gandhian Antecedents

    Richard Sorabji, Oxford
    Akeel Bilgrami, Columbia
    Ramin Jahanbegloo, York
    Brad Inwood, Toronto

    10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Oct 15, 2013
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Richard Sorabji – Gandhi and the Stoics

    2013.09.SorabjiRichard Sorabji
    Wolfson College, Oxford University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Oct 10, 2013
    Events on Campus
    The Charter of Quebec Values: whence, why and whither?

    Daniel Turp
    Professor, Université de Montréal and former MNA and MP

    Comment: Joseph Heath
    Director, Centre for Ethics and Professor of Philosophy

    Register:
    https://lacharte.eventbrite.com/

    The new proposed Charter of Quebec Values has generated
    much debate both within Quebec and across Canada. It has
    made international headlines. Daniel Turp and Joseph Heath will
    be discussing the genesis, content and goals of the Charter. The
    session will be moderated by Professor Irvin Studin, MPP
    Program Director at the School of Public Policy & Governance.

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    CG150
    14 Queens Park Crescent West

  • Fri, Oct 4, 2013
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop

    Nietzche and the Transfiguration of Nihilism

    Presenter: José Parra
    Discussant: Seth Jaffe

    Workshop Calendar

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Oct 2, 2013
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon

    Quantitative Ethics: Business Bribery Index (BBI) 2013.10.02 - Amir Farmanesh

    Amir Farmanesh
    Visiting Faculty, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Sep 25, 2013
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics at Noon

    “Can a Right to Reproduce Justify the Status Quo on Parental Licensing? 2013.09.25 - McLeod and Botterell

    Carolyn McLeod
    Visiting Professor, 2013-14, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario

    and

    Andrew Botterell
    Visiting Professor, 2013-14, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Department of Philosophy and Faculty of Law, University of Western Ontario

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Sep 20, 2013
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Workshop

    Karl Marx’s Radical Critique of Liberalism and the Future of Rights

    Presenter: Igor Shoikhedbrod
    Discussant: Ed Andrew

    Workshop Calendar

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Sep 16, 2013
    Perspectives on Ethics
    The Good, the Bad, and the Trivial

     

    September 16, 2013

    September 16, 2013

    Chrisoula Andreou
    Department of Philosophy, University of Utah

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Sep 13, 2013
    Events on Campus
    The Political Thought of C.B. Macpherson

    Macpherson poster

    You are all invited to a panel on the political thought of C.B. Macpherson on the occasion of the reissuing of his books by the Oxford and University of Toronto Presses, each book with a new introduction by U. of T. Political Science faculty.   The bookstore will be start selling the recently reissued books at 1:30 pm (the panel is from 2-4) – the bookstore will be set up outside of SSH 3130 and will be accepting cash, debit or credit cards, the books range from $20 – $30

    C.B. Macpherson was one of the preeminent political thinkers of the 20th Century, Macpherson’s academic career began as a student and continued as a professor in the U. of T. Department of Political Economy (and then Political Science).  His books, most translated into several languages, include Democracy in Alberta, The Political Theory of Possessive Individualism, Democratic Theory, The Life and Time of Liberal Democracy, Burke, and The Rise and Fall of Economic Justice

    02:00 PM - 04:00 PM
    Room 3130, Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George St.

  • Thu, May 9, 2013
    Events on Campus
    Later Spring Workshop

    Late Spring Workshop Program

    09:30 AM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Apr 15, 2013
    Author Meets Critics
    Graduate Associates: Author Meets Critics

    Author: 2013.04.15 - Jennifer Nedelsky
    Jennifer Nedelsky, Department of Political Science and Faculty of Law
    Law’s Relations: A Relational Theory of Self, Autonomy, and Law

    Graduate Critics:
    Luke Roelofs, Philosophy
    Teddy Harrison, Political Science
    Avery Au, Law

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Apr 12, 2013
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    The Conceptual Terrain of Trade-Union Theory
    Wayne Dealy

    Chair: Daniel Lee
    Discussant: Tom Malleson

    Workshop information

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Apr 5, 2013
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Agree to What? Or, a Rousseauian Republican Critique of the Liberal and Contemporary Republican Conceptions of Freedom
    Israela Stein

    Chair: Clifford Orwin

    Workshop information

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Apr 3, 2013
    Ethics at Noon
    Different and Unequal: Thinking Beyond Equality in Intimate Relationships

    Lauren Bialystok 2013.04.03-Lauren-Bialystok.jpg
    Humanities, Social Sciences & Social Justice Education (HSSSJE)
    OISE/University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Apr 1, 2013
    Public Lectures
    Attachment to Resources Is an Expensive Taste

    Lea Ypi 2013.04.01 - Lea Ypi
    London School of Economics and Political Science

    Abstract:

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 25, 2013
    Public Lectures
    Majorities and Minarets: Religious Freedom and Public Space

    Majorities and Minarets: Religious Freedom and Public Space 2013.03.25 - David Miller (alt)
    David Miller
    Professor of Political Theory
    Nuffield College
    Oxford

    2013.03.25 – David Miller (WEB)
    Abstract

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Seeley Hall
    Trinity College, 6 Hoskin Avenue

  • Fri, Mar 22, 2013
    Public Lectures
    What Makes Moral Judgments True?

    Russ Shafer-Landau 2013.03.22 - Russ Shafer-Landau
    Department of Philosophy
    University of Wisconsin

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 22, 2013
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Rights and Limits in a Constitutional State
    Jacob Weinrib

    Chair: Peggy Kohn

    Workshop information

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 20, 2013
    Public Lectures
    Malignant Accountability

    Yael (Yuli) Tamir
    Professor of Political Philosophy at Tel-Aviv University

    Event Co-sponsors: 2013.03.20 - Yael Tamir

    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto
    Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE/UT)
    School of Public Policy and Governance

    2013 03 20 – Yael Tamir (revised)

    Brief:

    07:00 PM - 09:00 PM
    Auditiorium 1180, Bahen Centre
    40 St. George Street

  • Mon, Mar 18, 2013
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Debating Political Secularism

    Jocelyn Maclure 2012.10.01 - James Bohman
    Department of Philosophy
    Université Laval

    (note change of date)

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Mar 15, 2013
    Events on Campus
    Theory and Practice: The Limits of Ethics for Guiding Action

    Centre for Ethics Graduate Conference 2013 - GA conference (blue)

    Keynote Speaker:
    Colin Farrelly
    Department of Political Studies

    Queen’s University
    “Empirical Ethics and Global Aging”

    Details: GACONFERENCECALLFORPAPERS docx

    Conference Schedule: GA Conference Schedule

    09:00 AM - 09:00 AM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 13, 2013
    Events on Campus
    Ethics, Society and Law Students Association

    Speaker: Paul Copeland, a Toronto-based Human Rights lawyer

    “Civil Disobedience as a Mode of Political Communication”

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 13, 2013
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethical Drones?

    Steven P. Lee 2013.03.13 - Steven Lee
    Visiting Professor, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    and
    Donald R. Harter ’39 Professor in the Humanities
    Department of Philosophy
    Hobart and William Smith Colleges
    Geneva, NY

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 6, 2013
    Ethics at Noon
    Getting the Trolley Problem Back on Track

    Andrew Stark
    Professor of Strategic Management, Department of Management, University of Toronto-Scarborough
    Professor of Political Science

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 4, 2013
    Events on Campus
    Responsibility to Protect – For and Against

    A Philosophers for Peace Debate

    For: Steven Lee

    Against: John Duncan

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 418, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Fri, Mar 1, 2013
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Nietzche’s Types and Typologies: Method and Prescription in Der Antichrist
    Tom Meredith

    Chair: Simone Chambers
    Discussant: Seth Jaffe

    Workshop information

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Feb 25, 2013
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Rights Forfeiture and Procedural Rights

    Christopher Heath Wellman 2012.11.26 - Michael Blake
    Department of Philosophy
    Washington University in St. Louis

    Abstract

    In this paper I defend the stark thesis that, absent special circumstances, there are no judicial procedural rights.  I first argue that there is no general moral right against double jeopardy.  Next I explain why punishing a criminal without first establishing her guilt via a fair trial does not necessarily violate her rights.  And finally, after responding to a number of possible objections, I consider the implications of my arguments for the human right to due process.

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Feb 13, 2013
    Ethics at Noon
    The Desirability of Rivalry, a Two-Steps Test

    Dominic Martin 2013.02.13 - Dominic Martin
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Feb 8, 2013
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Political Theory Research Workshop

    Wayne Dealy

    Workshop information

    02:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Feb 7, 2013
    Author Meets Critics
    God: Impossible or merely Improbable?

    A symposium on Colin Howson’s, Objecting to God 2013.02.07 - Colin Howson

    Moderator: Donald Ainslie, Toronto

    Logic: Colin Howson, Toronto
    Medieval: Peter King, Toronto
    Political: Joseph Heath, Toronto
    Epistemology: Jonathan Weisberg, Toronto

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Feb 1, 2013
    Events on Campus
    Seventh Annual Peace, Conflict & Justice Conference

    PCJ Conference

    07:00 PM - 10:00 PM


  • Fri, Feb 1, 2013
    Events on Campus
    TADA (Transatlantic Doctoral Academy)

    For more information please contact conference organizers: 
    thomas.beschorner@unisg.ch -or- sareh.pouryousefi@utoronto.ca

    2013 - Spring Term

    New Directions in Business Ethics 

    TADA Conference 2013, Friday – February, 1
    Location : Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Address: 15 Devonshire Place, Toronto ON Centre Website / Map / Directions 

    Speakers: Joseph Heath, Jeffery Smith, Andrew Crane, Dirk Matten,
    Chris MacDonald, & Wayne Norman

    9:00 – Welcome

    9:10 – Joseph Heath, University of Toronto:
    “Business Ethics: The Market Failures Approach”
    Commentary by Thorsten Busch, St.Gallen University/ HEC Montréal

    10:00 – break

    10:20 – Jeffery Smith, University of Redlands:
    “Corporate Responsibility and the Exercise of Authority”
    Commentary by Dominic Martin, University of Toronto

    11:10 – break

    11:30 – Wayne Norman, Duke University:
    “Whither Business Ethics?”
    Commentary by Sareh Pouryousefi, University of Toronto

    12:20 – Lunch

    1:30 – Dirk Matten, York University:
    “The embrace of institutional theory by CSR scholarship: The kiss of death or happy-ever-after?”
    Commentary by Laurence Vigneau, University of Nottingham, UK

    2:20 – break

    2:40 – Chris MacDonald, Ryerson University:
    “What Does Heath’s ‘Market Failures’ Model Require of Managers?”
    Commentary by Thomas Hajduk, University of St.Gallen

    3:30 – break

    3:50 – Andrew Crane, York University:
    “Modern slavery as a management practice: lots of business, 
    not too much ethics”
    Commentary by Matthias Schmidt, Beuth Hochschule Berlin, Germany

    4:40 – end of the conference

    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Jan 28, 2013
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Freedom of Complex Associations

    Jacob Levy 2013.01.28 - Jacob Levy
    Tomlinson Professor of Political Theory
    Department of Political Science
    McGill University

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Jan 23, 2013
    Ethics at Noon
    Justifying a Positive Social Discount Rate

    Joseph Heath 2013.01.23 - Joseph Heath
    Department of Philosophy
    and
    Director, Centre for Ethics

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Jan 14, 2013
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Preventing Regulatory Capture: Special Interest Influence and How to Limit It

    David A. Moss 2013.01.14 - David Moss copy
    John G. McLean Professor of Business Administration
    Harvard Business School

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Dec 6, 2012
    Ethics in Translation Lecture
    Bhakti and the Shaping of Social Imaginaries in Colonial India

    Dr Rinku Lamba 
    Assistant Professor
    Centre for Political Studies
    Jawaharlal Nehru University
    New Delhi, India

    Harold Coward India Research Fellow (August 2012 – December 2012)
    Centre for Studies in Religion and Society
    University of Victoria, Canada

    Abstract

    This event is co-sponsored by

    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    and
    Centre for South Asian Studies, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 30, 2012
    Political Theory Research Workshop, Events on Campus
    Political Theory Research Workshop – Paper 5

    ‘The (Political) Nature of the Firm’
    Abe Singer

    Discussant:  Professor Simone Chambers

    Workshop information

    01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 26, 2012
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Immigration, Jurisdiction and Exclusion

    Michael Blake 
    Professor of Philosophy and Public Affairs
    Department of Philosophy and Daniel J. Evans School of Public Policy
    University of Washington

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 21, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    Rethinking National Self-Determination

    Hege C. Finholt 
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics, University o Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 16, 2012
    Political Theory Research Workshop, Events on Campus
    Political Theory Research Workshop – Paper 4

    Ariel Zylberman, ‘Matters of International Concern: Human Rights as Conditions of Peace’ (Practice job talk)

    Please feel free to contact the workshop director (daniellee.lee@utoronto.ca) or the workshop coordinator (mauricio.suchowlansky@utoronto.ca) with any questions regarding the workshop.

    Workshop information

    01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 7, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    Children's Moral Conceptions of Lying: East-West Comparisons

    Kang Lee 
    Professor, Institute of Child Study – OISE/UT

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 5, 2012
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Tax is Not a Four Letter Word

    Alex Himelfarb 
    Director, Glendon School of Public and International Affairs
    York University

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 2, 2012
    Political Theory Research Workshop, Events on Campus
    Political Theory Research Workshop – Paper 3

    Workshop information

    ‘Society, Discord and the Politics of Equilibrium in Machiavelli’s Istorie Fiorentine
    Mauricio Suchowlansky,

    Discussant:  Ed Andrew

    01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Nov 1, 2012
    Author Meets Critics
    Reasoning: A Social Picture

    Anthony Simon Laden
    Professor of Philosophy, University of Illinois at Chicago

    Commentators:
    Simone Chambers, Department of Political Science
    Sergio Tenenbaum, Department of Philosophy
    Margaret Bowman, Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics

    http://www.amazon.com/dp/0199606196/?tag=newbooinhis-20#reader_0199606196

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Oct 24, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    Life is What Happens When You're Making Other Plans

    Margaret Bowman 
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 19, 2012
    Political Theory Research Workshop, Events on Campus
    Political Theory Research Workshop – Paper 2

    Lindsay Mahon (Political Science) will be presenting his paper ‘Inquiry and Storytelling in Herodotus: Sex, Murder and a Magic Dolphin’. To get full access to the paper, please contact our Workshop Director (daniellee.lee@utoronto.ca) or the Graduate Coordinator (mauricio.suchowlansky@utoronto.ca).

    Workshop information

    01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
    Room 214, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Oct 18, 2012
    Author Meets Critics
    Trust, Democracy and Multicultural Challenges

    Trust, Democracy and Multicultural Challenges

    Patti Tamara Lenard 
    Professor of Applied Ethics, Graduate School of Public and International Affairs
    University of Ottawa

    Law: Ayelet Shachar, Toronto
    Philosophy: Idil Boran, York
    Political Science: Margaret Kohn, Toronto

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Oct 10, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    Counting the Numbers Fairly: The Equal Proportional Satisfaction of Incommensurable Values

    Bruce Chapman 
    Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto

    Paper available on request: admin.ethics@utoronto.ca

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 5, 2012
    Political Theory Research Workshop, Events on Campus
    Political Theory Research Workshop – Paper 1

    Workshop information

    01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Oct 1, 2012
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Interdependence and the Sources of Domination

    James Bohman 
    Department of Philosophy
    St. Louis University

    Abstract:

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Sat, Sep 29, 2012
    Events on Campus
    Critical Theory Roundtable XX

    20th Annual Critical Theory Roundtable, 2012
    University of Toronto
    September 28-30, 2012

    12:00 AM - 12:00 AM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Sep 17, 2012
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Collective Responsibility and Collective Obligation

    Tracy Isaacs 
    Department of Philosophy
    Department of Women’s Studies and Feminist Research
    University of Western Ontario

    Abstract

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Sep 14, 2012
    Political Theory Research Workshop, Events on Campus
    Political Theory Research Workshop – Orientation Meeting

    Workshop information

    01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, May 28, 2012
    Public Lectures
    Violence, Fear and Sacrifice: The Forging of a People

    Uday Singh Mehta
    CUNY Graduate Centre

    01:30 PM - 03:30 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, May 16, 2012
    Public Lectures
    Tired of Capitalism? How about Something Better

    David Schweickart
    Professor of Philosophy, Loyola University of Chicago

    02:00 PM - 04:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Apr 18, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    he Democratic Legitimacy of Border Coercion: Freedom of Association, Territorial Dominion, and Self-Defence

    Arash Abizadeh
    Professor of Political Science, McGill University

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Apr 4, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    Toward a Theory of Modern Constitutional Law

    Jacob Weinrib
    PhD Candidate, Department of Philosophy and Doctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics

    12:00 AM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 28, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    Antigone's Right: Generation and Justice

    Kathryn Walker
    SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 19, 2012
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Leaving Consequentialism Behind

    Allen W. Wood 
    Department of Philosophy
    Stanford University

    See http://www.indiana.edu/~phil/people/allen-wood.shtml
    and
    http://philosophy.stanford.edu/profile/Allen+Wood/

    Abstract:

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 14, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    London Calling: How Imaginaries and Ideologies Answer for a Social Explosion

    John Grant
    SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Toronto
    Department of Political Science

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 7, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    Self-interest vs. the Common Good: On a Central Issue in Economic Ethics

    Manuel Wörsdörfer
    Chair of Economic Development and Integration
    Goethe-University Frankfurt
    and
    Visiting Fellow, Centre for Ethics

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Mar 5, 2012
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Discrimination as Negligence

    Sophia Reibetanz Moreau
    Professor of Philosophy and Law
    University of Toronto
    http://www.law.utoronto.ca/faculty_content.asp?profile=71&cType=facMembers

    Abstract:

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Feb 29, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    The Psychological Presuppositions of Capitalism: Ethics and the Market (again)

    Mark Peacock
    York University, Departments of Business and
    Society, Social and Political Thought

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Feb 8, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    Business Ethics as Value Alignment

    Chris MacDonald
    Saint Mary’s University, Halifax
    Department of Philosophy

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Jan 30, 2012
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Velleman's Constructivism

    Philip Clark 
    Department of Philosophy
    University of Toronto

    Abstract:

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Jan 25, 2012
    Ethics at Noon
    Modernity and Postcolonial Nationhood: Mahatma Gandhi and Sun Yat-sen

    Theresa Lee
    University of Guelph, Department of Political Science and
    Visiting Faculty Fellow, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Jan 16, 2012
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Intercultural Political Theory, Globalization, and Democratic Agency

    Melissa Williams 
    Department of Political Science
    University of Toronto
    http://politics.utoronto.ca/faculty/profile/?id=98

    Abstract

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Dec 7, 2011
    Ethics at Noon
    The Cultivation of Responsiveness and the Problem of Thoughtlessness

    Jacob Schiff
    University of Toronto,
    Department of Political Science

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Nov 30, 2011
    Ethics at Noon
    Mainland Chinese Adolescents' Reasoning about Rights, Freedoms and Democratic Principles

    Charles Helwig
    Department of Psychology, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 28, 2011
    Perspectives on Ethics
    When the State Speaks, What Should it Say? How Democracies Can Protect Expression and Promote Equality

    Corey Brettschneider 
    Department of Political Science, Brown University
    and
    Rockefeller Faculty Fellow, Princeton University Centre for Human Values (2010-2011)
    Webpage:http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Political_Science/people/Website.html
    SSRN Author page: http://ssrn.com/author=655991

    Abstract

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Nov 22, 2011
    Ethics at Noon
    Disorderly Pluralism and the Function of Legal Rights

    James Sherman
    SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Philosophy, University of Toronto
    and Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Nov 15, 2011
    Ethics at Noon
    Must there be Basic Action?

    Douglas Lavin is the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Humanities, Department of Philosophy, Harvard University. His main interests are in ethics and the philosophy of action. His current work includes “Practical Reason and the Possibility of Error”, Ethics 114 (April 2004), which he hopes is the first in a series of papers on the conditions of rational agency. He also has teaching interests in the history of ethics and the philosophy of law, especially criminal law.

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Nov 14, 2011
    Public Lectures
    What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do When You Don't Know What to Do…

    Andrew Sepielli 
    Department of Philosophy
    University of Toronto

    Abstract

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 4, 2011
    Events on Campus
    Politics in Hard times through the Prism of the New Hard Times

    Department of Political Science: Toronto International Relations Seminar Series

     With: Peter Gourevitch

    For more information please contact: th.hall@utoronto.ca

    12:00 PM - 01:30 PM
    Room 3130, Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George St.

  • Thu, Nov 3, 2011

    Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists and the Remaking of the British Empire

    Trinity College and the Munk School of Global Affairs present:

    The 2011 Margaret MacMillan Lecture in International Relations

    With: Dr. Maya Jasanoff

    Please RSVP at: cera@trinity.utoronto.ca or 416-946-3346

    05:00 PM - 12:00 AM
    George Ignatieff Theatre, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Nov 3, 2011

    Vindicating Autonomy: Kant, Sartre and O'Neill

    Department of Philosophy: Modern Philosophy Research Group Talk

    For more information please contact: kheubner@utsc.utoronto.ca

    03:15 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 418, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Wed, Nov 2, 2011

    Suicide: A Qualified Defence

    Joint Centre for Bioethics: Seminar Series

    With: David Benatar

    For more information please contact: beth.woods@utoronto.ca

    04:10 PM - 05:30 PM
    Room 754, Health Sciences Building
    155 College St.

  • Wed, Nov 2, 2011
    Ethics at Noon
    Office is a Thing Borrowed: Jean Bodin between Sovereignty and Legality

    Daniel Lee
    Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Oct 28, 2011
    Events on Campus
    Islam & Its Heritage of Non-Violence

    Noor Cultural Centre

    With: Amitabh Pal and Dr. Ramin Jahanbegloo

    Cost: $5

    For more information please go to: www.noorculturalcentre.ca

    07:00 PM - 09:00 PM
    Noor Cultural Centre
    123 Wynford Dr.

  • Fri, Oct 28, 2011
    Events on Campus
    Eros at the Core of Philosophy

    CPAMP Talk

    With: Paul Woodruff

    For more information please contact: cpamp@chass.utoronto.ca

    03:15 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 418, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Fri, Oct 28, 2011
    Events on Campus
    Misunderstanding Justice and Rights

    Faculty of Law: Legal Theory Workshop

    With: Richard Wright

    For more information please contact: n.gulezko@utoronto.ca

    01:00 PM - 02:30 PM
    Dining Room, Flavelle House, Faculty of Law
    78 Queen's Park Avenue

  • Fri, Oct 28, 2011
    Events on Campus
    Writing Empire's Garden: Assam and the Making of India

    Munk School of Global Affairs
    Centre for South Asian Studies
    Asian Institute

    with: Jayeeta Sharma

    Register Online: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?EventID=10601

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    208N, Munk School
    1 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Oct 27, 2011
    Reading Series
    Fukuyama's Origins of Political Order

    For more information please contact: spouryousefi@gmail.com or luke.roelofs@utoronto.ca

    01:00 PM - 03:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Oct 25, 2011

    Safeguarding Data: Looking at Privacy Order HO-07

    The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health

    Brown Bag Research Ethics Discussion Groups 2011

    With: Rex Roman

    For more information please contact: Susan.Pilon@camh.net

     

    12:00 PM - 01:00 PM
    Room 2022 ELCLC
    33 Russell Street

  • Mon, Oct 24, 2011

    The Arab Revolutions: Democracy and Historical Consciousness

    With: Abdou Filai-Ansary

    Register at: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/EventDetails.aspx?eventid=10882

    For more information please contact: louis.pauly@utoronto.ca

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Oct 20, 2011
    Ethics at Noon
    Corporate Criminal Responsibility

    Ian Lee
    Faculty of Law, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Oct 17, 2011
    Public Issues Forum
    On the very good idea of a good war: Afghanistan ten years in

    Our Afghan Decade: A roundtable discussion on the past, present and future of Canada’s mission in Afghanistan http://this.org/magazine/2011/09/23/10-years-in-afghanistan/

    THE PANELSTS:

    Amir Attaran is Professor in the Faculties of Law and Medicine at the University of Ottawa, and holder of the Canada Research Chair in Law, Population Health and Global Development Policy.

    Cheshmak Farhoumand-Sims is a peace and human rights educator, researcher, and consultant specializing both in women’s rights in conflict-affected contexts, and in Afghanistan.

    Graeme Smith is an award-winning foreign correspondent for /The Globe and Mail/, based in Kandahar for three years, and since reporting from India, Pakistan, Libya, and beyond.

    John Duncan is the director of the Ethics, Society, and Law program at the University of Trinity College in the University of Toronto.

    MODERATOR:

    Melissa S. Williams is Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto.

    CO-SPONSORS:

    •Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    •The Provost, Trinity College
    •The Margaret MacMillan Trinity One Programme, Trinity College
    •The International Relations Programme, Trinity College
    •Victoria College
    •Ethics, Society & Law Students’ Association, Trinity College

    03:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Cartwright Hall, 1st Floor, St. Hilda's Residence
    44 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Oct 13, 2011
    Author Meets Critics
    Assisted Death: A Study in Ethics and Law

    Wayne Sumner
    University Professor Emeritus
    Department of Philosophy

    Commentators:
    Prof. Donald Ainslie
    Department of Philosophy, University of Toronto
    Principal, University College

    Prof. Bernard Dickens
    Faculty of Law and Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto
    Co-Director, International Reproductive and Sexual Health Law Programme 

    Dr. James Downar
    Palliative Care and Intensive Care
    University Health Network, University of Toronto

    *The book will be available for purchase and signing by the author.

    Click here to view a description of the book

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Oct 6, 2011

    Freedom and Necessity in Hegel's 'Philosophy of History' and 'Philosophy of Right'

    Sally Sedgwick, University of Illinois at Chicago

    03:15 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 100A, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Wed, Oct 5, 2011

    Advocacy in Health Care: Documents and Demonstrations

    Philip Berger                                                                                                                                  MD, Chief, Dept. of Family and Community Medicine, Medical Director, Inner City Health Program, St. Michael’s Hospital

    04:10 PM - 05:30 PM
    Room 754, Health Sciences Building
    155 College St.

  • Wed, Oct 5, 2011
    Ethics at Noon
    Responsibility and Response-dependence

    Christine Tappolet
    Department of Philosophy, Université de Montréal
    and Visiting Faculty Fellow, Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Oct 3, 2011
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Right in the Middle: Normativity and Idealized Subjective Theories of Well-Being

    Valerie Tiberius
    Department of Philosophy
    University of Minnesota
    http://www.tc.umn.edu/~tiberius/

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Mon, Sep 26, 2011
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Continuous and Discontinuous Persons: Two Dimensions of Ethical Life

    Continuous and Discontinuous Persons: Two Dimensions of Ethical LifeMichael Lambek, FRSC
    Professor of Anthropology & Canada Research Chair
    University of Toronto at Scarborough
    http://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/~socsci/lambek/

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Sep 22, 2011
    Public Lectures
    Doubting and Defending the Principle of Fairness

    Richard Arneson
    Department of Philosophy
    University of California, Berkeley
    http://philosophyfaculty.ucsd.edu/faculty/rarneson/

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Jul 27, 2011
    Author Meets Critics
    Hannah’s Turn – A play about Hannah Arendt and Martin Heidegger

    Written by Mark Migotti and Richard Sanger
    Directed by Mary Francis Moore
    With: Severn ThompsonRichard Clarkin and Leora Morris
    Discussion introduced and moderated by Mark Kingwell

     

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM


  • Wed, May 4, 2011
    Public Issues Forum
    The Ethics of Ghost Authorship in Biomedical Research: Concerns and Remedies

    Trudo Lemmens, LicJur (KULeuven),
    LLM, DCL (McGill)
    Associate Professor
    Faculty of Law, University of Toronto
    Hamid Reza Raziee, MD. MSHc. (Bioethics)
    Research Associate, Faculty of Law, and
    Member, Joint Centre for Bioethics,
    University of Toronto
    Simon Stern, J.D. (Yale)
    Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto
    08:30 AM - 05:00 PM
    (Classroom A) Flavelle House, Faculty of Law
    78 Queen’s Park Avenue