Upcoming Events @ C4E: Info & Registration

  • Mon, Jan 25, 2021
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Loubna El Amine, Status, Hierarchy, and the State: Women in the Confucian Classics (Perspectives on Ethics)

    Status, Hierarchy, and the State: Women in the Confucian Classics

    Early Confucian philosophical texts, like the Analects and the Mencius, rarely mention women but the other ancient Classics, including the Rituals and the Annals, a chronicle of events from the city of Lu, are full of descriptions and ancedotes about them. In this talk, I analyze these descriptions and ancedotes, arguing that the place of women in social and political life, and the distinction between men and women, were not key issues of concern in those Classics dating from the Warring States period (479-221 BCE)—a time when the boundaries of the political community were only loosely defined. It is only after the rise of the Han Dynasty in the 3rd century BCE that ideas about what women as a general category should or should not do, in contradistinction with men, start significantly appearing in the Classics. Gender can be viewed as part of a larger attempt by the Han to fashion a new centralized, and strongly defined, political entity. I also suggest that themes that structure how women are presented in early Greek writings, particularly in Greek Classical tragedies, are not nearly as prominent in the Chinese Classics: these themes are war and military prowess, pregnancy and birth, and, following from the previous two, the grieving mother. Finally, I return to the Confucian philosophical texts and attempt to make sense of the absence of women in them.

    ► please register here

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Monday, January 25. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Loubna El AmineLoubna El Amine
    Political Science
    Northwestern University

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Jan 26, 2021
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ishtiaque Ahmed, Whose Intelligence? Whose Ethics?: Ethical Pluralism and Postcolonial Computing (Ethics of AI in Context)

    Whose Intelligence? Whose Ethics?: Ethical Pluralism and Postcolonial Computing

    With the unprecedented advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in the last decade, several ethical concerns AI technologies have also emerged. Researchers today are concerned about bias, discrimination, surveillance, and privacy breaching in the use of AI technologies, just to mention a few. However, most of this discourse around “Ethics in AI” has become centered on western societies, and the concerns are emerging from and getting shaped by ethical values that more common in the West than in other parts of the world. To this end, my research explores this ethical concerns of AI in the context of the Global South, especially in the Indian Subcontinent. Based on my decade-long work in Bangladesh and India, I present in this talk, how data-driven AI technologies are challenging local faith, familial values, customs, and traditions, and imposing scientific rationality through various postcolonial computing practices. I further explore how a novel kind of intelligence can be imagined by incorporating local values and community participation.

    ► please register here

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Tuesday, January 26. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Ishtiaque Ahmed
    Computer Science
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Jan 27, 2021
    Ethics at Noon
    Juliette Ferry-Danini, What Is the Problem with the Opacity of Artificial Intelligence in Medicine? (Ethics@Noon-ish)

    What Is the Problem with the Opacity of Artificial Intelligence in Medicine?

    Artificial intelligence has been met with great enthusiasm by the scientific community. However, philosophers and especially ethicists have voiced some concerns. The concepts of “opacity” and “transparency” of algorithms have been coined with the presupposition that opacity in AI is something to avoid and conversely transparency is a goal to achieve in the field. Numerous guidelines have been published on the ethics of AI, resulting in several reviews (Jobin, Ienca, and Vayena 2019; Rothenberger, Fabian, and Arunov 2019; Hagendorff 2020). In these guidelines, transparency is routinely described as one of the key ethical principles the field of AI should follow. The concept, however, is not straightforward. It could first be defined in an epistemic way: an algorithm is transparent if and only if we understand how it works and we can explain it. Here transparency could be synonymous with “explainability.” In the case of medicine and decision-making algorithms, the main worry concerns how health professionals may be able to justify a diagnostic without being able to explain how they came to it and why (Goodman 2016). However, it could be argued that such an epistemic opacity is already constitutive of evidence-based medicine, where mechanisms are often not known and explanations of efficiency never certain (London 2019). Yet, there is at least a second meaning attached to the concepts of “transparency” or “opacity” which goes beyond the issue of explainability. In the ethics of AI’s literature, notably, the issues at stake have also been framed as how we came to the knowledge we now claim to have and more specifically, how the data have been selected to build a specific algorithm.

    The aim of this talk will thus be twofold: first, to map the different meanings of the concept of “transparency” and its mirror concept “opacity” both in the ethics of AI, on the one hand, and in the philosophy of medicine and bioethics, on the other hand. Second, my goal will be to pave the way to understand in which sense – ethical and/or epistemological – opacity should be avoided both in medicine and in AI (and a fortiori in AI in medicine). What is the problem with the opacity of artificial intelligence in medicine?

    ► please register here

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Wednesday, January 27. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Juliette Ferry-Danini
    Centre for Ethics Postdoctoral Fellow in Ethics of Artificial Intelligence
    Philosophy, Sorbonne Université

    12:30 PM - 01:45 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Jan 27, 2021
    Ethics of AI in Context: Emerging Scholars
    Kamilah Ebrahim, The Limits of Anti-Trust Regulation: Reorienting Towards Considerations of Epistemic Power (Ethics of AI in Context: Emerging Scholars)

    The Limits of Anti-Trust Regulation: Reorienting Towards Considerations of Epistemic Power

    The current monopoly over data production, collection and information centralizes epistemic power and the capacity to accumulate economic capital through data. At the same time this process dispossesses marginalized and racialized communities from the data they are producing. The result is a dynamic that mirrors the dispossession created through colonialism in a new form of “techno-imperialism”. Current debates surrounding monopoly structures in technology tend to focus on the economic effects rather than the epistemic consequences, this talk will refocus this conversation and consider the pros and cons of anti-trust policy solutions currently being considered in Canada.

    ► please register here

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Wednesday, January 27. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Kamilah Ebrahim received a B.A. in Economics from the University of Waterloo in 2019 and is currently pursuing a Masters of Information in Human Centred Data Science at the University of Toronto. Kamilah is a 2020-21 Graduate Fellow at the University of Toronto Centre for Ethics focusing on the intersection between race, economics and data monopolies in Canada. Prior to joining the University of Toronto she held roles at the United Nation Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UN ESCAP), as well as the Canadian federal government.

    04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Thu, Jan 28, 2021
    Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars
    Nisrine Rahal, A Real Battlefield for Emancipation: The Hamburg Kindergarten Movement 1849-1852 (Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars)

    A Real Battlefield for Emancipation: The Hamburg Kindergarten Movement 1849-1852

    From 1849 to 1852 a network of kindergartens were opened in the German port city of Hamburg. These kindergartens were funded and supported by the dissenting German-Catholic Congregation (established in the city in 1847), the Women’s Association to Support the German-Catholics, the Social Association for the Reconciliation of Confessional Differences, and the Women’s Association to Support Poor Welfare. These associations and the dissenting congregation provided the space for a new women’s activism that was centered on essentialized feminine characteristics such as maternal love and care. Love for these associations united women across religious lines and was essential for the project of social and cultural reform not only in the city-state but also for humanity. This love needed to be cultivated and practiced in educational and welfare institutions for the benefit of all of society. The kindergarten, these activists believed, was the ideal location for this love and care.  My presentation will focus on unpacking these associations and their support for the kindergarten in Hamburg. It will shed light on the new language of rights, women’s activism, and religious freedom that characterized the movement for the kindergarten during the revolutionary 1840s and early 1850s in German-Speaking Europe.

    ► please register here

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Thursday, January 28. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Nisrine Rahal is a doctoral candidate at the Department of History at the University of Toronto. Her dissertation, A Garden of Children and the Education of Citizens: The German Kindergarten Movement from 1837 to 1880 examines the early children’s education institution as a social reformist movement tied to the revolutionary 1840s. Her dissertation project follows the movement as a way to examine histories of social reform, gender, liberalism, and state power. Between June 2017 and March 2018, she was a doctoral fellow at the Leibniz Institute of European History. She also held a Leo Baeck Fellowship between October 2015 and October 2016. Her project received support from the Central European History Society, the Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz, and the Bibliothek für Bildungsgeschichtliche Forschung (BBF) des Deutschen Instituts für Internationale Pädagogische Forschung (DIPF).

    Nisrine Rahal
    History
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Fri, Jan 29, 2021
    Author Meets Critics, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics in the City
    Smart Cities in Canada: Digital Dreams, Corporate Designs (Author Meets Critics)

    Smart Cities in Canada: Digital Dreams, Corporate Designs (Mariana Valverde & Alexandra Flynn eds., 2020)

    Mariana Valverde
    Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies
    University of Toronto

    Alexandra Flynn
    Peter A. Allard School of Law
    University of British Columbia

    Commentators:
    Beth Coleman
    (Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology & Faculty of Information, University of Toronto)
    Renee Sieber
    (Geography, McGill University)
    David Murakami Wood
    (Sociology, Queen’s University)

    Moderator:
    Jamie Duncan
    (Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies, University of Toronto)

    “Smart cities” use surveillance, big data processing and interactive technologies to reshape urban life. Transit riders can see the bus coming on a map on their phones. Cities can measure and analyze the garbage collected from every household. Businesses can track individuals’ movements and precisely target advertisements.

    Google’s failed Sidewalk Labs proposal in Toronto, which drew sharp criticism over surveillance and privacy concerns, is just one of the many smart city projects which have been proposed or are underway in Canada. Iqaluit, Edmonton, Guelph, Montreal, Toronto and other cities and towns are all grappling with how to use these technologies. Some cities have quickly partnered with digital giants like Uber, Bell and IBM. Others have kept their distance. Big tech companies are hard at work recruiting customers and shaping – sometimes making – public policy on data collection and privacy.

    Smart Cities for Canada: Promise and Perils is the first book on smart cities in Canada. In this collection, experts from across the country investigate what this new approach means for the problems cities face, and expose the larger issues about urban planning and democracy raised by smart city technology.

    ► please register here

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Friday, January 29. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, Feb 4, 2021
    Critical Race Studies, Race, Ethics + Power
    Yolonda Wilson (Critical Race Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Thursday, February 4. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Yolonda WilsonYolonda Wilson
    Philosophy
    Howard University

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Fri, Feb 5, 2021
    Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars
    Ola Muhammed (Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Friday, February 5. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Ola MuhammedOla Muhammed
    Black Studies
    York University

    04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Feb 9, 2021
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Devin Guillory (The Ethics of AI in Context)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Tuesday, February 9. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Devin GuilloryDevin Guillory
    Computer Science
    UC Berkeley

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Feb 10, 2021
    Ethics at Noon
    Miriam Hird-Younger (Ethics@Noon-ish)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Wednesday, February 10. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Miriam Hird-Younger
    Centre for Ethics Doctoral Fellow
    Anthropology
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 01:45 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Feb 10, 2021
    Ethics, Aesthetics, Feminisms
    Anjo-Marí Gouws, “EXTREMELY BAD MONOLOGUE IN HEAD”: Failure and Form in Anne Charlotte Robertson’s Confessionals (Ethics, Aesthetics, Feminisms)

    “EXTREMELY BAD MONOLOGUE IN HEAD”: Failure and Form in Anne Charlotte Robertson’s Confessionals

    In therapy since the age of 17, filmmaker Anne Charlotte Robertson had, she noted, been given a range of diagnoses over the course of her life: “adult life-crisis adjustment, anxiety, borderline psychotic, manic-depressive, obsessive.” Little documentation survives of these diagnoses; from what does survive, it seems that the diagnoses most consistently made were that of bipolar depression, and of schizoaffective disorder. Her magnum opus Five Year Diary (1981-1998), a multi-modal diary project that includes a forty-hour long Super 8-diary film, at different instances both facilitated her obsessive states of delusion and became a tool for pushing back against the nonsensical. In this talk I am interested in how Robertson employed particular formal devices to make sense of her illness to herself, but also, in an expanded manner, to make sense of her illness to others. She did so through her use of the close-up, in a register of confessional sequences that proliferate throughout the latter part of the film; and through an incorporation of the failure of her apparatus into a larger conversation about the failure of her body. Throughout this analysis I position Robertson’s interventions against the backdrop of the larger history of women’s psychiatric profiling and its capture on camera.

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Wednesday, February 10. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Anjo-Marí Gouws

    Dr Anjo-marí Gouws is a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Cinema and Media Arts at York University. She is working on a monograph titled Recording the Work of a World: Anne Charlotte Robertson and the Domestication of Cinema.

     

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Thu, Feb 11, 2021
    Critical Race Studies, Race, Ethics + Power
    Dorothy Kim (Critical Race Studies: Interdisciplinary Perspectives)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Thursday, February 11. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Dorothy KimDorothy Kim
    English & Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies
    Brandeis University

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Mon, Feb 15, 2021
    Ethics & Caribbean Philosophy
    Kris Sealey, Creolizing the Nation: Nationalism and Caribbean Philosophy (Ethics & Caribbean Philosophy)

    Creolizing the Nation: Nationalism and Caribbean Philosophy

    Kris Sealey is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fairfield University. Her scholarship is in the areas of Critical Philosophy of Race, Caribbean Philosophy and Decolonial Theory. In her most recent book, Creolizing the Nation, Dr. Sealey investigates how everyday practices of freedom shape both subject formation and community formation in decolonial contexts. Her book offers creolization as a conceptual tool through which such formations might be theorized and brought to bear on contemporary understandings of the nation. In her talk, we will discuss her new book.

    ► please register here

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Monday, February 15. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Kris SealeyKris Sealey
    Philosophy

    Fairfield University

    06:00 PM - 07:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Thu, Feb 18, 2021
    Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars
    Senthuran Varatharajah (Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Thursday, February 18. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Senthuran Varatharajah
    Philosopher and Novelist

    04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Feb 23, 2021
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Elettra Bietti, From Ethics Washing to Ethics Bashing: Viewing Tech Ethics from Within Moral Philosophy (Ethics of AI in Context)

    From Ethics Washing to Ethics Bashing: Viewing Tech Ethics from Within Moral Philosophy

    The word ‘ethics’ is overused in technology policy circles. Weaponized in support of deregulation, self-regulation or hands-off governance, “ethics” is increasingly identified with technology companies’ self-regulatory efforts and with shallow appearances of ethical behavior. So-called “ethics washing” by tech companies is on the rise, prompting criticism and scrutiny from scholars and the tech community at large. In parallel to the growth of ethics washing, its condemnation has led to a tendency to engage in “ethics bashing.” This consists in the trivialization of ethics and moral philosophy now understood as discrete tools or pre-formed social structures such as ethics boards, self-governance schemes or stakeholder groups.

    The misunderstandings underlying ethics bashing are at least three-fold: (a) philosophy is understood in opposition and as alternative to law, political representation and social organizing; (b) philosophy and “ethics” are seen as a formalistic methodology, vulnerable to instrumentalization and abuse, and thus ontologically flawed; and (c) engagement in moral philosophy is downplayed and portrayed as mere “ivory tower” intellectualization of complex problems that need to be dealt with through alternative and more practical methodologies.

    This talk argues that the rhetoric of ethics and morality should not be reductively instrumentalized, either by the industry in the form of “ethics washing,” or by scholars and policy-makers in the form of “ethics bashing.” Grappling with the role of philosophy and ethics requires moving beyond simplification and seeing ethics as a mode of inquiry that facilitates the evaluation of competing tech policy strategies. In other words, we must resist narrow reductivism of moral philosophy as instrumentalized performance and renew our faith in its intrinsic moral value as a mode of knowledge-seeking and inquiry. Far from mandating a self-regulatory scheme or a given governance structure, moral philosophy in fact facilitates the questioning and reconsideration of any given practice, situating it within a complex web of legal, political and economic institutions. Moral philosophy indeed can shed new light on human practices by adding needed perspective, explaining the relationship between technology and other worthy goals, situating technology within the human, the social, the political.

    ► please register here

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Tuesday, February 23. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Elettra Bietti
    Harvard Law School

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Feb 24, 2021
    Ethics of AI in Context: Emerging Scholars
    Suzanne Kite and Scott Benesiinaabandan, (Ethics of AI in Context: Emerging Scholars)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Wednesday, February 24. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Suzanne KiteSuzanne Kite
    Oglala Lakota Performance Artist

     

     

     

     

    Scott BenesiinaabandanScott Benesiinaabandan
    Anishinabe Intermedia Artist

     

    04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Thu, Feb 25, 2021
    Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars
    Gayathri Naganathan (Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Thursday, February 25. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Gayathri NaganathanGayathri Naganathan
    General Surgery Resident
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Mon, Mar 1, 2021
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Clare Hemmings (Perspectives on Ethics)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Monday, March 1. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Clare HemmingsClare Hemmings
    Gender Studies
    LSE

    12:30 PM - 01:45 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Mar 3, 2021
    Ethics, Aesthetics, Feminisms
    Jodi Byrd (Ethics, Aesthetics, Feminisms)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Wednesday, March 3. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Jodi ByrdJodi Byrd
    Illinois
    English

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Thu, Mar 4, 2021
    Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars
    Seong-gee Um (Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Thursday, March 4. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Seong-gee UmSeong-gee Um
    Researcher
    Wellesley Institute

    04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Mar 9, 2021
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ben Green (Ethics of AI in Context)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Tuesday, March 9. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Ben GreenBen Green
    Applied Mathematics
    Harvard

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Mar 10, 2021
    Ethics, Aesthetics, Feminisms
    Rey Chow & Austin Safar, "We Other Victorians"? Novelistic Remains, Therapeutic Devices, Contemporary Televisual Dramas (Ethics, Aesthetics, Feminisms)

    As part of our Ethics, Aesthetics, Feminisms series, the Centre for Ethics is excited to present a unique seminar event with Dr. Rey Chow and Austin Safar where they will discuss their recent co-authored paper, ‘”We Other Victorians”? Novelistic Remains, Therapeutic Devices, Contemporary Televisual Dramas.’ This seminar will take place on Wednesday, March 10th, 4-5:30pm EDT. This event will not be live-streamed, so attendees must register in advance to receive the seminar’s Zoom link. We will be capping the event at 100 participants. Please register with your name and email using this form. Attendees should also read the paper in advance of our meeting. You can find the paper here. Please contact Doctoral Fellow Amanda Greer with any questions or concerns at amanda.greer@mail.utoronto.ca.

    Rey ChowRey Chow
    Literature
    Trinity College of Arts and Sciences, Duke University

     

     

     

    Austin Sarfan is a Ph.D. candidate in the Program in Literature at the Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. He is completing a dissertation on the postcolonial reception of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, with broad research interests in literary modernism, poststructuralism, and the cultural study of the emotions.

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Thu, Mar 18, 2021
    Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars
    Jonathan Kwan (Race, Ethics + Power: Emerging Scholars)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Thursday, March 18. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Jonathan KwanJonathan Kwan
    Postdoctoral Fellow, Applied Ethics
    Santa Clara University

    04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Mon, Mar 22, 2021
    Ethics & Caribbean Philosophy
    Miguel Gualdrón Ramírez, Édouard Glissant’s Ethics (Ethics & Caribbean Philosophy)

    Édouard Glissant’s Ethics

    Miguel Gualdrón Ramírez is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at The University of North Texas. His work focuses on the interconnection between history, politics, and aesthetics in Latin America and the Caribbean, and philosophical attempts at approaching these topics collectively. In his Ethics and Caribbean Philosophy presentation, we will discuss his recent essay “To ’stay where you are’ as a decolonial gesture: Glissant’s philosophy of Caribbean history in the context of Césaire and Fanon.”

    ► please register here

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Monday, March 22. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Miguel Gualdrón RamírezMiguel Gualdrón Ramírez
    Philosophy

    University of North Texas

    06:00 PM - 07:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Mar 24, 2021
    Ethics, Aesthetics, Feminisms
    Grace Lavery (Ethics, Aesthetics, Feminisms)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Wednesday, March 24. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Grace LaveryGrace Lavery
    English
    University of California, Berkeley

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Mar 31, 2021
    Ethics of AI in Context: Emerging Scholars
    Julian Posada (Ethics of AI in Context: Emerging Scholars)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Wednesday, March 31. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Julian PosadaJulian Posada
    Faculty of Information
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Apr 7, 2021
    Ethics, Aesthetics, Feminisms
    Ara Osterweil (Ethics, Aesthetics, Feminisms)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Wednesday, April 7. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Ara OsterweilAra Osterweil
    English
    McGill

    04:00 PM - 05:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Apr 14, 2021
    Ethics of AI in Context: Emerging Scholars
    Noam Kolt (Ethics of AI in Context: Emerging Scholars)

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel on Wednesday, April 14. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream. (For other events in the series, and to subscribe, visit YouTube.com/c/CentreforEthics.)

    Noam KoltNoam Kolt
    Law
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Fri, Jul 9, 2021
    Conferences
    Conference: The Ethics of Human Rights

    The Ethics of Human Rights

    This international and interdisciplinary conference tackles several key questions concerning human rights today: What is the most claims to human rights can achieve? How can human rights be a starting point for making claims on the nation-state? Are human rights claims necessarily addressed to nation-states? And what alternative political visions do human rights exclude? Panels of leading anthropologists, legal theorists, political scientists, and philosophers will discuss and debate these questions. Workshop proceedings will appear as a symposium in the Centre’s open-access journal.

    Preliminary Schedule

    12pm [= 9am Pacific/5pm UK/6pm Central Europe]
    Panel 1: Field Notes on Human Rights
    Catherine Bolten
    , Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of Notre Dame
    Ayça Çubukçu, Associate Professor in Human Rights and Co-Director of LSE Human Rights, London School of Economics

    1pm [= 10am/6pm/7pm]
    Panel 2: The Borders of Rights
    Angela Riley,
    Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law
    Ayten Gündoğdu, Tow Associate Professor of Political Science, Barnard College
    Yanilda Gonzalez, Assistant Professor of Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

    2:30pm [= 11:30am/7:30pm/8:30pm]
    Panel 3: Human Rights and Ethical Claims
    Benjamin Davis
    , Post-doctoral Fellow in Ethics, University of Toronto, Centre for Ethics
    Kelly Staples, Director of Learning & Teaching, Politics & International Relations, University of Leicester

    This is an online event. It will be live streamed on the Centre for Ethics YouTube Channel at 12pm, Friday, July 9 [= 9am Pacific/5pm UK/6pm Central Europe]. Channel subscribers will receive a notification at the start of the live stream.

    12:00 PM - 03:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto

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