Events @ C4E

  • Tue, Jan 8, 2019

    "Grace" by Jane Doe (Nightwood Theatre)

    Grace by Jane Doe – January 8-26, 2019 at Streetcar Crowsnest. A Nightwood Theatre production in association with Crow’s Theatre. Directed by Andrea Donaldson, starring Michaela Washburn, Rose Napoli, Brenda Robins and Conrad Coates.

    Exquisitely told in a stunning blend of documentary theatre, striking visual projections and choreography, Grace is a searing piece that ignites a pertinent discussion on the failures and limitations of the legal system. “There was no justice, there was just a legal outcome.” In the wake of a young woman’s disclosure of childhood sexual assault, a family presses charges. A true story about survival, hope, and the pursuit of justice at a time when provability still usurps truth in our courtrooms.

    ☛ tickets $25-$40 at crowstheatre.com.

    co-sponsored by, among others:

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Streetcar Crowsnest
    345 Carlaw Avenue

  • Wed, Jan 23, 2019
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Étienne Brown

    Misinformation and Freedom of Expression

    With the rise of ‘fake news,’ European liberal democracies are currently in the midst of a debate about the value of laws that aim to regulate the spread of false information on the internet. One central objection directed against such laws is that they represent undue violations of our individual right to freedom of expression. In this presentation, I argue that they do not. More precisely, I contend that legal prohibitions against the intentional spread of false information can be justified on three main philosophical accounts of free speech: the epistemic account, the civic duties account, and the harm-based account. I then consider the objection according to which any legal prohibition against intentional misinformation will unjustly set back the interests of individuals who unintentionally misinform others.

    ☛ please register here

    Étienne Brown
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Jan 23, 2019
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics in the City
    Ethics & Film: The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces (Ethics in the City Film Series)

    watch preview here

    This highly influential film in architecture and planning circles by William H. Whyte analyzes the success and failures of urban spaces. Observing the natural order of spaces and the way people move through them, Whyte provides an intuitive critique of urban spaces and ways these spaces can be improved. (IMDB; Luke Keller)

    Join us for a screening plus discussion (and cookies)!

    ☛ please register here

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Jan 28, 2019
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Rachel Nolan

    The Ethics of International Adoption

    Illegal or gray adoptions are most frequently associated with armed conflicts and dirty wars in Argentina, Francoist Spain, and Nazi Germany. Cross-racial forcible adoption also has a painful history as part of settler colonial projects in Canada, the U.S., and Australia. This talk will consider a case that combines elements of both historical patterns: Guatemala during the twentieth century. International adoptions began during Guatemala’s civil war (1960-1996) and grew rapidly–overtaking other “sender” countries until 1 in 110 children born in Guatemala was relinquished at the height of the adoption boom. This talk will draw on oral histories, judicial records, and all of the state adoption files from the period to consider the adoptions of indigenous children during the most violent years of the war (1982-1986) without meaningful parental consent as part of a wider project to erase indigenous peoples. Forcible adoption is just now beginning to be understood, like sexual violence, as a tool of war and social control.

    ☛ please register here

    Rachel Nolan
    Columbia University
    Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race

    co-sponsored by:

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Jan 29, 2019
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Kelly Hannah-Moffat

    Risk, Intersectional Inequalities and Racial Proxies: How Is Machine Learning and Big Data Shaping Legal and Criminal Justice Analysis of “Risk”? 

    CJS and social justice organizations and individuals are challenging and redefining conventional risk episteme(s) through the use of big data analytics, which are shifting organizational risk practices, challenging social science methods of assessing risk, and affecting knowledge about risk. I argue that big data reconfigures risk by producing a form of algorithmic risk, which is different from the actuarial risk techniques already in use in many justice sectors; that new experts are entering the risk gametechnologists who make data public and accessible to a range of stakeholders; and that big data analytics can be used to produce forms of usable knowledge but questions still persist on whether or not these technologies can learn how to limit bias and inequality.

    ☛ please register here  

    Kelly Hannah-Moffat
    University of Toronto
    Criminology & Sociolegal Studies

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Jan 30, 2019
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Brian Price

    Boredom, Objectivity and the Picture of Solidarity

    In this talk, I will propose that objectivity is only accessible in a state of boredom, and that boredom is an experience that is much rarer than we regularly suppose it to be. One consequence of this claim will be to add ballast, in temporal terms, to Richard Rorty’s well known contention that solidarity is a more reliable way of accessing agreement in the social, and for the sake of social change, than is any appeal we might make to objectivity. Yet, in my account, what follows or interrupts boredom are acts of picturing—attempts to feature for ourselves a different way of relating to what appears to us in the rare instant of boredom, and that divide us from each other just as much as unite us. At issue, then, will be the extent to which acts of picturing—described as a particular way of thinking and of regarding thought in relation to the failure of objectivity—produce an imaginative density across perceivers that might inhibit solidarity by virtue of the same procedures that compel it. At the heart of my discussion will be a little-seen film, Sleeping Dogs Lie (2006, d. Bobcat Golthwaite).

    ☛ please register here

    Brian Price
    University of Toronto
    Cinema Studies

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Mon, Feb 4, 2019
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Sorry to Bother You

    Presenter:
    Daniel Adleman
    Writing and Rhetoric
    Innis College, University of Toronto

    ☛ please register here

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 6, 2019
    Ethics in the City
    Ethics in the City: Robert Vipond

    What Does It Take To Be ‘One of Us’? Lessons from the History of a Toronto Public School

    Robert Vipond
    University of Toronto
    Political Science

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 6, 2019
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics in the City
    Ethics & Film: The Human Scale (Ethics in the City Film Series)

    Half of the human population lives in urban areas. By 2050, this will increase to 80%. Life in a megacity is both enchanting and problematic. Today we face peak oil, climate change, loneliness and severe health issues due to our way of life. But why? The Danish architect and professor Jan Gehl has studied human behavior in cities through four decades. He has documented how modern cities repel human interaction, and argues that we can build cities in a way, which takes human needs for inclusion and intimacy into account. ‘The Human Scale’ meets thinkers, architects and urban planners across the globe. It questions our assumptions about modernity, exploring what happens when we put people into the centre of our planning. (IMBD; Final Cut for Real)

    Join us for a screening plus discussion (and cookies)!

    ☛ please register here

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Feb 12, 2019
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Sheila McIlraith

    Sheila McIlraith
    University of Toronto
    Computer Science

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Feb 12, 2019
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics of AI Film Series
    Ethics & Film: Black Mirror (Ethics of AI Film Series)

    ☛ please register here

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 13, 2019
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Ashley Rubin

    Ashley Rubin
    University of Toronto
    Sociology

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Feb 26, 2019
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Chelsea Barabas

    Chelsea Barabas
    MIT
    Media Lab


    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Feb 27, 2019
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Thilo Schaefer

    Thilo Schaefer
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Doctoral Fellow

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Mon, Mar 4, 2019
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Jennifer Morton

    Jennifer Morton
    City College of New York
    Philosophy

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Mar 12, 2019
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Virginia Eubanks

    Virginia Eubanks
    SUNY Albany
    Political Science

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Mar 12, 2019
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics of AI Film Series
    Ethics & Film: Westworld (Ethics of AI Film Series)

    ☛ please register here

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Mar 13, 2019
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Tom Parr

    Tom Parr
    University of Essex
    Department of Government

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Mar 27, 2019
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Benjamin Berger

    Benjamin Berger
    York University
    Osgoode Hall Law School

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Mar 27, 2019
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics in the City
    Ethics & Film: Metropolis (Ethics in the City Film Series)

    In a futuristic city sharply divided between the working class and the city planners, the son of the city’s mastermind falls in love with a working class prophet who predicts the coming of a savior to mediate their differences. (IMDb)

    Join us for a screening plus discussion (and cookies)!

    ☛ please register here

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, May 3, 2019
    Conferences
    The Ethics of Roles: Public, Professional, Personal (C4E Graduate Student Conference)

    The 7th Annual Graduate Student Conference
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    May 3-4, 2019

    Call for Papers (due January 31, 2019)

    The Ethics of Roles: Public, Professional, Personal will explore the place of roles within our ethical lives, such as the ways in which roles can alter our moral duties, improve or corrupt our moral character, and shape our understanding of others. We will also consider the ethical dimensions of specific roles, for example: public servants, lawyers, medical professionals, business professionals, academics, artists, religious or spiritual advisors, citizens, parents, siblings and friends. The hope is for this breadth of focus to reveal common questions and further our understanding of roles and their ethics.

    The conference will feature a public keynote address by Arthur Applbaum, Adams Professor of Political Leadership and Democratic Values at Harvard University. Applbaum is the author of Ethics for Adversaries: The Morality of Roles in Public and Professional Life. His work has appeared in journals such as Philosophy & Public Affairs, Journal of the American Medical Association, Harvard Law Review, Ethics, and Legal Theory.

    Keynote Speaker:
    Arthur Applbaum
    Lerman Neubauer Professor of Democracy and Public Policy
    Brandeis University

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, Jun 27, 2019
    Events on Campus
    Media Ethics: Human Ecology in a Connected World

    The 20th Annual Convention of the Media Ecology Association
    International Conference
    Toronto, 27-30 June 2019

    Presented by:

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
    St Michael's College
    81 St. Mary Street

Past Events