Ethics of AI in Context @C4E Makes the (UofT) News

From U of T News:

Markus Dubber’s first brush with artificial intelligence, or AI, occurred in an unlikely place: a performance of his daughter’s choir. The director of the University of Toronto’s Centre for Ethics bumped into Ajay Agrawal, another proud parent who also happens to be a professor at U of T’s Rotman School of Management and the founder of U of T’s Creative Destruction Lab – a seed stage accelerator that specializes in scaling startups that employ AI technologies. Read more.

Underrated Philosophers? Alternative Careers?: New from Open Questions Podcast @C4E

Check out the new episode from Open Questions: An Ethics Podcast @UofTEthics hosted by Jeremy Davis & Eric Mathison, available on SoundCloudStitcher, and iTunes.

This week we hear from some of the philosophers we spoke to in previous episodes. They answer some general questions, like what they would be doing if they didn’t go into philosophy and which philosophers they think are underrated. Open Questions is a production of the Centre for Ethics at the University of Toronto. The music is written and performed by Markku Wainman.

Get the answers from Open Questions: An Ethics Podcast @UofTEthics hosted by Jeremy Davis & Eric Mathison, available on SoundCloudStitcher, and iTunes.

 

“Should I Order the Fish?” Another New Podcast from Open Questions @C4E

Check out the new episode from Open Questions: An Ethics Podcast @UofTEthics hosted by Jeremy Davis & Eric Mathison, available on SoundCloudStitcher, and iTunes.

We give and ask for advice all the time. But what makes advice good? What responsibility do we have in giving advice?

Get the answers from Open Questions: An Ethics Podcast @UofTEthics hosted by Jeremy Davis & Eric Mathison, available on SoundCloudStitcher, and iTunes.

New Event! Ethics of AI in Context: Hector Levesque, Rethinking the Place of Thinking in Intelligent Behaviour

Ethics of AI in Context: Hector Levesque, Rethinking the Place of Thinking in Intelligent Behaviour

It seems clear that in people, ordinary commonsense thinking is an essential part of acting intelligently.  Yet the most popular current approach to Artificial Intelligence downplays this thinking aspect and emphasizes learning from massive amounts of data instead.  This talk goes over these notions and attempts to make the case that computers systems based even on extensive learning alone might have serious dangers that are not immediately obvious.

Hector Levesque
Computer Science
University of Toronto

Tue, Nov 7, 2017
04:00 PM – 06:00 PM
Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
Rm 200, Larkin Building