Events @ C4E

  • Mon, Sep 25, 2017
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI: Mark Kingwell, Respect and the Artificial Other

    What role do personhood, respect, tolerance, and sympathy play in our relations to future AI developments? Do other concepts familiar from political-theoretic likewise apply, and if so, how? In this talk I will sketch some ideas for how to think productively about human-AI relations as their complexity advances in both the short- and long-term.

    Mark Kingwell
    Department of Philosophy
    University of Toronto

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Sep 27, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Eva-Lynne Jagoe

    The Ethics of the Individual

    This discussion will revolve around the disjuncture between the ethical stance of the individual and the structures of late capitalism. What beliefs and stories do we tell ourselves about our own personal decisions and our responsibilities in the face of the challenges that our society faces as we move into an uncertain future?

    Eva-Lynne Jagoe
    Professor of Comparative Literature & Spanish and Portuguese
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Sep 29, 2017

    Master Class: Sheila Jasanoff, Post-Modern Democracy: Truth and Trust in the Public Sphere

    Post-Modern Democracy: Truth and Trust in the Public Sphere

    Even before Donald Trump was elected president of the United States in 2016, political commentators began expressing concerns about the decay of truthfulness in the public sphere. How, they asked, could any form of political legitimacy be maintained in a world where there were no agreed upon facts. Among the responses to this dilemma, one that has found widespread favor among liberals and progressives is that scientific consensus must be respected and held apart from politics. In a democracy, so the truism goes, people are entitled to their own opinions but not to their own facts. This analysis, however, is flawed. It is both ahistorical and asymmetrical in relegating public facts to a position outside of politics and society, a move that denies the contingent, constructed, and culturally situated character of truth in the public sphere. This presentation will propose an alternative view based on findings from Science and Technology Studies. The common misconception that recognizing the contingency of facts is equivalent to radical relativism will be discussed and set aside.

    Please note: This Master Class is open to graduate students at the University of Toronto. If you’re interested in attending, please contact ethics@utoronto.ca. Space is limited and registration is required.

    Sheila Jasanoff
    Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies

    Director, Program on Science, Technology and Society
    Harvard Kennedy School

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Sep 29, 2017
    Public Lectures
    Sheila Jasanoff, Ethical Futures: Imagination and Governance in an Unequal World

    Ethical Futures: Imagination and Governance in an Unequal World

    A C4E Public Lecture by

    Sheila Jasanoff
    Pforzheimer Professor of Science and Technology Studies
    Director, Program on Science, Technology and Society
    Harvard Kennedy School

    Can we responsibly design a future that does not connect to its pasts?  Can we govern a future that we cannot imagine?  As technology becomes the most powerful instrument for shaping the human future, these questions have assumed greater importance for moral engagement and analysis.  Using examples such as nuclear risk, assisted reproduction, and agricultural biotechnology, I will show that choices of how to live with technology are shaped and constrained by prior, institutionalized visions of the public good.  New and emerging technologies, reflecting longstanding socioeconomic disparities among human societies, threaten to override such cross-cultural variations in moral imagination and associated norms of democratic self-governance.  How should global societies respond to that challenge?  Contemporary debates around gene editing, especially of the human germline, offer an opportunity for further reflection on this point.

    Eventbrite - Ethical Futures: Imagination and Governance in an Unequal World (w/ Sheila Jasanoff)

    co-sponsored by:


     

     

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Vivian and David Campbell Conference Facility
    1 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Oct 3, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Weiner

     

     

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, Oct 5, 2017
    Ethics at Noon, Professing Ethics
    Ethics@Noon: Sunit Das

    Medical, Legal and Ethical Definitions of Futility

    What is medical futility? How do we define it? How does uncertainty about the meaning of what is futile direct us in the practical work of patient care? And how do we reconcile these questions with legal understandings of medical futility?

    In this seminar, we will attempt to address these concerns through an exploration of both conceptual and practical issues of the ethics of medical futility.

    Dr. Sunit Das
    Division of Neurosurgery
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Oct 11, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: François du Bois

    Corrective Justice and Deterrence: A Partial Reconciliation?

    This talk will subject the two dominant theoretical accounts of private law to a critical assessment proceeding from the fundamental commitment of a liberal legal order to treating persons as ethically reasoning agents. The conclusions reached will then be used to explain why private law in many jurisdictions (not least Canada) fails to conform fully to the ideals articulated by either account but exhibits features of both corrective justice and deterrence.

    François du Bois
    Professor
    Leicester Law School

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Oct 17, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Tangerine

     

     

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Oct 18, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Lucia Zedner

    Policing Civility in Public Space: Civil Orders and Uncivil Practices

    Public policing is increasingly sidelined by the rise of publicly owned private spaces, private security and the proliferation of alternate civil and regulatory measures. This paper examines a raft of civil measures introduced in the UK to police those whose presence is deemed inimical to a contrived idea of public civility. One particularly egregious example are Public Spaces Protection Orders, which allow officials to impose infinite restrictions and exclusions upon those whose conduct has, or might in future have, a ‘detrimental effect on the quality of life of those in the locality’. The paper considers their implications for justice, for those ‘uncivil’ citizens subjected to their prohibitions, and for participation in public life. It suggests that such disciplinary measures erode the very safeguards by which citizens are – or should be – protected against the unwarranted exercise of state coercive power. Targeting the poor, the homeless, the young, and marginalized, orders that seek to manufacture the appearance of civility arguably do little more than cosmetically conceal the underlying injustices of modern urban life.

    Lucia Zedner
    Faculty of Law & All Souls College
    Oxford University

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, Oct 19, 2017
    Events on Campus
    Radical Black Political Thought in the 20th and 21st Centuries

    New date: Oct. 19, 2017

    Working with and through a black radical/critical intellectual and political tradition, this talk–hosted by the Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education–will map another genealogy of critical theory which posits that the central issues of our time are our modes of production of the human and freedom. It will argue that contemporary black radical political thought (including the contributions of WEB DuBois, Sylvia Wynter, Frantz Fanon and Aimé Césaire) opens up spaces for the reframing of current critical theory.

    Speaker:bbogues_photo_
    Professor Anthony Bogues, Asa Messer Professor of Humanities and Critical Theory, Professor of Africana Studies & Director of the Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice (CSSJ), Brown University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
    252 Bloor Street West

  • Fri, Oct 20, 2017
    Conferences
    Conference: The Ethics of Apology: Interdisciplinary & International Perspectives

    Today, apologies seem to be everywhere. Individuals apologize, offenders, doctors, lawyers, as do corporations, organizations, universities, police departments, cities, countries, and governments. We crave apologies, we seek and demand them, insisting that we “deserve” them. And sometimes, but not always, we “get” an apology, or at least we get a promise to get one later.

    Apologies may be ubiquitous, and yet they remain little understood. This workshop will consider questions such as: Why do we seek apologies? And why do we give them? How do they work (if they work)? What do apologies do? What do they mean, in different contexts, at different times, to different people? What makes a good apology, an effective one, a sincere or genuine or heartfelt one? What distinguishes apologies from apparent social, legal, rhetorical, or communicative alternatives like expressions of regret or sympathy and acknowledgments of fault, of responsibility, or of guilt? In general, is there an ethics of apology, a set of substantive and procedural norms that govern their performance, interpretation, and implementation in various cultural and historical settings?

    On the occasion of Canada’s 150th birthday, the proposed workshop sets out to explore the modern—or perhaps not-so-modern—phenomenon of the apology and its place in the ethos of contemporary Canadian society and politics. We will focus on certain apologetic moments in Canadian political life, placing them in a broad interdisciplinary and comparative context; these include, for instance, the various apologies offered for state wrongs committed against indigenous people over the past 150 years of Canadian history and, most recently, the demand that the federal government issue an official apology for “state sponsored discrimination against Canada’s LGBTQ2SI communities” (EGALE 2016), in contrast to remedies for unjust government actions offered elsewhere (expungement or pardon of convictions in the UK and Australia, compensation in Germany). It is one thing to regard an official apology as an acceptable symbolic alternative to an elusive concrete and enforceable legal remedy. Under what circumstances might an apology be regarded not as merely acceptable, but as preferable?

    To shed light on the ubiquitous yet still mysterious, and mysteriously powerful, phenomenon of the apology through open debate across modes and subjects of inquiry, this workshop brings together an interdisciplinary and international group of scholars, students, and activists at the Centre for Ethics, the University of Toronto’s interdisciplinary centre aimed at advancing research and teaching in the field of ethics, broadly defined. The results of this exercise in communal critical analysis will be widely shared beyond the walls of the university through dissemination on the Centre’s online open-access journal and YouTube channel, with the aim of stimulating and facilitating public debate about the role and continued salience of apologies in contemporary social, political, and ethical discourse, in Canada and beyond.

    Participants:
    Doug Elliott (Cambridge LLP, Toronto), “So Sorry: The Legal Myths and Social Realities of the Official Apology”
    Teddy Harrison (University of Toronto, Political Science), “Apologies and Violence in Criminal Justice”
    Cindy Holder (University of Victoria, Philosophy), “Whose Wrong Is It Anyway? Reflecting on the Public-ness of Public Apologies”
    Matt James & Jordan Stanger-Ross (University of Victoria, Political Science & History), “Impermanent Apologies: On the Dynamics of Timing and Public Knowledge in Political Apology”
    Patrick Keilty (University of Toronto, Faculty of Information), “Sorry/Not Sorry: Sexual Regulation and Apology at the Toronto Police Service”
    Mark Kingwell (University of Toronto, Philosophy), “Apologies: A Stylistic Investigation”
    Daryl Koehn (DePaul University, Philosophy), “The Business Ethics of CEO Apologies”
    Nico Lacetera (University of Toronto, Management), “Corporate Apologies and the Ethics of Trust”
    Steven Maynard (Queen’s University, History), “Sorry Seems to be the Easiest Word: The Gay Pardon in Canada and the ‘Rehabilitation’ of Queer History”
    John Ricco (University of Toronto, Art History), “On Queer Forgiveness”
    Mayana Slobodian (University of Toronto, Centre for Criminology & Sociolegal Studies), “Finding Canada’s Official Apology at the Truth & Reconciliation Commission”
    Nick Smith (University of New Hampshire, Philosophy), “Apologies as Remedies/Apologies as Weapons” (Keynote)
    Simon Stern (University of Toronto, Law & English), “Atonement, Closure, and Narrative”

    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Oct 20, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Simon Lambek, Theorizing Rhetorical Democracy: World-Building and Critique 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 3130, Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George St.

  • Fri, Oct 20, 2017
    Public Lectures
    Nick Smith, Apologies as Remedies/Apologies as Weapons

    Apologies as Remedies/Apologies as Weapons

    A C4E Public Lecture by

    Nick Smith
    Professor of Philosophy & Department Chair
    University of New Hampshire

    Apologies pervade our news headlines and our private affairs, but how should we evaluate these complex rituals? An apology can save a marriage, salvage a career, reduce settlement damages by millions, shave years off of criminal sentences, or even prevent a war. Whether from a child nudged to apologize to a sibling or an offender expressing remorse in hopes of avoiding execution, expressions of contrition can convey meaning across many different kinds of value and we suffer from considerable confusion about the moral meanings and social functions of these interactions.

    Beyond apologies from individuals, collective apologies add layers of intricacy and policy implications. If an executive publicly apologizes for a faulty product while corporate counsel simultaneously denies wrongdoing and obscures personal responsibility of anyone in the organization, how does this correspond to common expectations that accepting blame and changing behavior are cornerstones of good apologies? If a head of state draws attention to and apologizes for the offenses of a previous administration and provides only symbolic redress, how should we understand the value of such political theater?

    co-sponsor:

    03:30 PM - 05:00 PM
    Room 100, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Mon, Oct 23, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: George Pavlakos

    A Plea for Moderate Optimisation: On the Structure of Constitutional Principles as Interpersonal Reasons

    In this talk I will make a modest effort to overcome the dichotomy between a teleological and deontological understanding of constitutional rights, which I argue underpins the debate on the principle of proportionality in constitutional law. In an opening part I will introduce a standard account of constitutional principles as optimization requirements, which has come to be known as Theory of Principles [Prinzipientheorie], and then draw a distinction between a demanding and a moderate conception of optimisation. I will suggest that while the demanding conception is incompatible with the deontological character of rights, it is also one that does not find strong support in the standard account. Conversely the standard account lends support to a moderate conception of optimisation, which may be rendered compatible with the deontological character of constitutional rights. Whether it can be thus rendered, depends on the possibility of reconciling deontological with other impersonal (teleological) reasons, which I set out to explore in the third part of the talk. There I discuss the familiar distinction between agent-neutral and agent-relative reasons with an eye to demonstrating that no sharp separation can be maintained between these two conceptions of reasons, at least not in the Kantian framework within which the standard account of Theory of Principles operates.

    In concluding, I will suggest out that a relaxation of the tension between agent-neutral and agent-relative reasons can contribute to a better understanding of the claim that legal principles aim at optimisation. A notable consequence is that proportionality control is better understood in terms of determination of abstract normative reasons (principles) than in terms of balancing between disparate or conflicting standards.

    George Pavlakos
    School of Law
    University of Glasgow

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Thu, Oct 26, 2017
    Author Meets Critics
    Author Meets Critics: Alan Brudner

    The Owl and the Rooster: Hegel’s Transformative Political Science (Cambridge 2017)

    Alan Brudner
    Albert Abel Professor of Law Emeritus
    University of Toronto

    Since 1945, there have been two waves of Anglo-American writing on Hegel’s political thought. The first defended it against works portraying Hegel as an apologist of Prussian reaction and a theorist of totalitarian nationalism. The second presented Hegel as a civic humanist critic of liberalism in the tradition of Rousseau. The first suppressed elements of Hegel’s thought that challenge liberalism’s individualistic premises; the second downplayed Hegel’s theism. This book recovers what was lost in each wave. It restores aspects of Hegel’s political thought unsettling to liberal beliefs, yet that lead to a state more liberal than Locke’s and Kant’s, which retain authoritarian elements. It also scrutinizes Hegel’s claim to have justified theism to rational insight, hence to have made it conformable to Enlightenment standards of admissible public discourse. And it seeks to show how, for Hegel, the wholeness unique to divinity is realizable among humans without concession or compromise and what role philosophy must play in its final achievement. Lastly, we are shown what form Hegel’s philosophy can take in a world not yet prepared for his science. Here is Hegel’s political thought undistorted.

    hosted by:

    co-sponsored by:

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Faculty of Law, Conference Centre
    78 Queen's Park

  • Fri, Oct 27, 2017
    Conferences
    Conference: Judgement, Relationality, Care: A Celebration of the Work of Jennifer Nedelsky

    This is a symposium devoted to a discussion of the work of Jennifer Nedelsky. It will begin with introductory reflections on Jenny’s first book devoted to the theme of property and American Constitutionalism and then proceed with three panels each devoted to an important theme of Jenny’s subsequent work: political judgement, law’s relations and work-care relations.

    co-sponsored by:


    09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Nov 1, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Amber Riaz

    Moral Learning and Experience

    Many philosophers think that although experience sometimes plays a crucial role in putting one in a position to attain moral knowledge, moral knowledge is not empirical knowledge. In a recent paper defending this Orthodox View (“Moral Knowledge and Experience”), Sarah McGrath argues that at best experience can play an enabling, triggering and sensitizing role in the acquisition of moral knowledge, but that it neither gives moral knowledge, nor provides evidence for it. In this talk, I will consider and reject some arguments for the Orthodox View. In addition, I will provide an alternative account according to which there is at least some moral learning by experience, and experience provides an important evidential role in the acquisition of moral knowledge.

    Amber Riaz
    Assistant Professor

    Department of Humanities & Social Sciences
    LUMS (Lahore University of Management Sciences)

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Nov 3, 2017
    Critical Ethics
    Extractive Moralities?: The Impact of the Refugee Boom in the Republic of Nauru

    Extractive Moralities?: The Impact of the Refugee Boom in the Republic of Nauru

    As market fundamentalism shapes an increasing “world of things,” this paper draws attention to a new site of commodification: the human as refugee. In the wake of more refugee flows and the political potency of refugee scares, governments have brokered trade deals to extend the geographies of refugee processing and distribution into new sites far beyond their borders. Drawing on 15 months of fieldwork conducted between Geneva, Australia, Fiji, and the Republic of Nauru, this paper follows a supply chain in refugees through to its grounded operations. Under 2001 then 2012 agreements, Nauru, the world’s smallest island state, bankrupt in the 1990s from days of phosphate wealth, resurged on the back of refugee wealth, importing Australia’s maritime asylum seeking populations. This paper examines the impact of the refugee boom on Nauruans’ quotidian lives, in which global media and social movements have come to play a powerful role in extraterritorially shaping local communities, resulting in fractious social relations. The moral values attached to Nauru’s latest extractive project signal a resource curse far more socially repercussive than the environmental destructions of the nation’s past phosphate boom. I discuss the implications of outsourcing refugee systems, and the unequal labor practices that the fetishization of the refugee obscures and reproduces.

    Julia Morris
    Post-doctoral Fellow
    The New School Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility.

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Nov 3, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Daniel Sherwin, Comparative Political Theory in Canada: Engaging Indigenous Resurgence 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Nov 6, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Valsamis Mitsilegas

    The Ethos of European Criminal Law

    The development of EU powers in the field of criminal law has been, and remains to date, a contested enterprise from the perspective of both state sovereignty and the protection of fundamental rights. In looking at the Ethos of European Criminal Law, the presentation will cast light on the main challenges underpinning the evolution of European Criminal Law by examining closely four fundamental questions:  the ‘why’ question (why has supranational integration in the field evolved and what are the main legal interests upheld by Europeanisation); the ‘how’ question (how has Europeanisation occurred and what are the forms of governance in European criminal law); the ‘what’ question (what is the content of European criminal law); and the ‘for whom’ question (who is European Criminal Law entitled to address and/or protect). Answers to these questions will lead to an analysis of the Ethos of European Criminal Law placed within the broader EU and domestic constitutional context.

    Valsamis Mitsilegas
    Queen Mary University of London
    Professor of European Criminal Law, Head of the Department of Law and Dean for Research (Humanities and Social Sciences)

     


     

    03:00 PM - 05:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Nov 7, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Roger & Me

     

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Nov 13, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Sophia Vasalou
    Approaching the Virtues in the Islamic Tradition

    Over the last few decades, there has been a dramatic surge of interest in moral character and the virtues among philosophers and psychologists. This has led to a fresh concern to explore the different ways in which the virtues have been approached historically, not only in philosophical but also in religious contexts. In this talk, my aim is to reflect on—and open a discussion of—the place of the virtues in the Islamic tradition. Within this tradition, there were several genres of ethical writing that we might identify as having hosted an engagement with the virtues. These include works of philosophical ethics, Sufi treatises, works of literature (adab), and mirrors for princes. Yet just how comfortably can we indeed identify the moral concepts that govern these works with the virtues, as these are often understood? How seriously do these works take what we would call character? Using the philosophical tradition as my foil—including the work of the well-known ethicist Abū ʿAlī Miskawayh—I will tackle these questions by focusing on the eminent 11th-century theologian Abū Ḥāmid al-Ghazālī. In the Revival of the Religious Sciences, al-Ghazālī drew on Sufi and philosophical ideas to articulate a vision of the ethical and spiritual life that pivoted on the realisation of certain kinds of valued internal states. In true eudaimonist style, these states are viewed as playing an indispensable role in the achievement of happiness. Yet is al-Ghazālī talking about the virtues? Just how robust is the concept of character at work in his thinking? And what does this have to tell us about the prospects of locating the virtues within the Islamic tradition more broadly?

    Sophia Vasalou
    Library of Arabic Literature Fellow
    Department of Theology and Religion
    University of Birmingham
    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Nov 17, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Emily Nacol, The Politics of Contagion: Immunity and Community in Modern Plague Narratives 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Nov 21, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: The White Ribbon

     

     

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Nov 22, 2017
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Antje du Bois-Pedain

    Punishment and the Passage of Time

    Antje du Bois-Pedain
    Senior Lecturer
    Faculty of Law
    Cambridge University

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Dec 1, 2017
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Danny Hutton Ferris, Three Theories of Political Representation 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Dec 5, 2017
    Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Iron Eaters

     

     

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Dec 6, 2017

    Master Class: James Forman Jr.

    James Forman Jr.
    Professor of Law
    Yale Law School

    co-sponsored by:

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Dec 6, 2017
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: James Forman Jr.

    James Forman Jr.
    Professor of Law
    Yale Law School

    co-sponsored by:

     

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Jan 10, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Audrey Macklin

    Audrey Macklin
    Director, Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
    Professor of Law and Chair in Human Rights
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Jan 15, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Joshua Knobe

    Joshua Knobe
    Yale University
    Program in Cognitive Science &
    Department of Philosophy

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, Jan 19, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Constantine Vassiliou, Montesquieu and Hume's English Affinities: The Nature of Honour and Its Function in Polite Commercial Society 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Jan 24, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Richard Moon

    Richard Moon
    Professor of Law
    University of Windsor

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Feb 2, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Chi Kwok, Personal Autonomy and Workplace Justice 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Feb 5, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Jennifer Carlson

    The Police Man’s Burden: Emotional Labor, Masculinity and the Ethics of Force

    Use of force is central to police work, yet the contours of the use of force for American police have changed dramatically in recent years. First, police have become increasingly prepared to use force due to changes in training and equipment amid threats of mass shootings, domestic terrorism, and so forth. Second, police are increasingly policing contexts that are gun-rich and gun law-lax, with over 13 million people licensed to carry guns in the US. Third, police have increasingly faced public outcry related to the use of force, especially with regard to racial disparities in excessive force. In what contexts do police embrace, versus accept or even avoid, the use of force? Is police use of force equally ‘non-negotiable’ (see Bittner, 1973) across social settings? If not, why not—and to what ends? To explore these questions, this talk draws on interviews with nearly 80 police chiefs across Arizona, California, and Michigan. While policing scholarship has documented how “hard charger” masculinist approaches to policing mediates the central role of firearms in constituting “real” policework (see Herbert, 2001), I draw on the concept of ‘moral wages’ (see Kolb, 2014) to show how guns operate not just as means of violence but also as gendered tools of emotional management. Examining how police evaluate more versus less moralistic uses of force and at times even opt out of force, I show that police make ethical sense of the use of force by framing it as masculine carework. Further situating these findings within the divergent contexts of Arizona, California and Michigan (especially their respective gun cultures) reveals that the boundaries between police and broader society are more porous than often acknowledged: police sensibilities about legitimate force are patterned by more localized norms regarding the use of force as well as by the socio-legal regimes in which police are embedded.

    Jennifer Carlson
    University of Arizona
    School of Sociology & School of Government and Public Policy

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Wed, Feb 7, 2018
    Conferences
    Conference: Collective and Temporally Extended Rights and Wrongs

    Collective and Temporally Extended Rights and Wrongs

    Paradigmatic cases of moral obligations and wrongdoing involve a single act of an individual towards specific persons. However many cases of moral obligations and wrong do not have this structure. I can wrong a student by repeatedly failing to call on her in class, even if I am not obligated to call on her on any specific occasion. It seems also that we together can wrong others even though no individual act of any of us wrongs any specific other person. A similar structure presents itself in the theories of practical reason and collective rationality. Philosophers have examined the rational demands on behaviour that obtain in virtue of projects, plans, and commitments that extend through time. In the area of collective action, we may ask how my participation in a collective action contributes to the assessment of what is rational for me to do.

    Sergio Tenenbaum
    Professor of Philosophy
    University of Toronto
    09:00 AM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 14, 2018
    Author Meets Critics
    Author Meets Critics: Mara Marin

    Connected by Commitment: Oppression and Our Responsibility to Undermine It (Oxford 2017)

    Mara Marin
    Postdoctoral Affiliate, Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    Commentators:
    Shannon Dea
    (Philosophy, University of Waterloo)
    Kerry Rittich (Law, University of Toronto)
    Meredith Schwartz (Philosophy, Ryerson University)
    Torrey Shanks (Political Science, University of Toronto)

    Saying that political and social oppression is a deeply unjust and widespread condition of life is not a terribly controversial statement. Likewise, theorists of justice frequently consider our obligation to not turn a blind eye to oppression. But what is our culpability in the endurance of oppression?

    In this book, Mara Marin complicates the primary ways in which we make sense of human and political relationships and our obligations within them. Rather than thinking of relationships in terms of our intentions, Marin thinks of them as open-ended and subject to ongoing commitments. Commitments create open-ended expectations and vulnerabilities on the part of others, and therefore also obligations. By this rationale, our actions sustain oppressive or productive structures in virtue of their cumulative effects, not the intentions of the actors.When we violate our obligations we oppress others.

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Feb 16, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Cáit Power, The Jew in Speech: Conceiving the City, God, and Man 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Feb 26, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Kali Nicole Gross

    Kali Nicole Gross
    African American Studies
    Wesleyan University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 28, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: John-Stewart Gordon

    John-Stewart Gordon
    Professor & Head of the Research Cluster for Applied Ethics
    Vytautas Magnus University Kaunas

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Mar 2, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Thilo Schaefer, Laneways of the Imagination: The Importance of "Utopia" for City Building 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Mar 7, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Simon Lambek

    Simon Lambek
    Doctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Mar 12, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Jessica Rosenfeld

    Jessica Rosenfeld
    Department of English
    Washington University in St. Louis

    co-sponsored by

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Wed, Mar 14, 2018

    Ethics@Noon: Jeremy Davis

    Jeremy Davis
    Doctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Mar 16, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Zhichao Tong, Epistemic Democracy and International Relations 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Mar 26, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics, Events on Campus
    Shai Lavi

    Shai Lavi
    Director, Van Leer Jerusalem Institute

    hosted by:

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 100, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Wed, Mar 28, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Ryan Liss

    Crime at the Limits of Sovereignty

    Ryan Liss
    Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow
    Centre for Ethics

    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, May 3, 2018

    Master Class: Rainer Forst

    Rainer Forst
    Professor of Political Theory & Philosophy
    Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M.

    co-sponsored by:

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, May 4, 2018
    Events on Campus
    Rainer Forst

    Rainer Forst
    Professor of Political Theory & Philosophy
    Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M.

    hosted by:

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Solarium, Faculty of Law
    84 Queen's Park, Falconer Hall

  • Fri, May 11, 2018
    Conferences
    Globalization and Its Critics in the 21st Century

    The 6th Annual
    University of Toronto
    Centre for Ethics

    Graduate Student Conference
    May 11-12, 2018

    Globalization and Its Critics in the 21st Century will take the opportunity to consider the ethical implications of the resurgence of anti-globalization movements, in an interdisciplinary setting. We will look at the categories and concepts that different disciplines have used to understand, defend, or critique globalization and its critics, and ask whether they remain adequate frameworks for thinking about contemporary developments.

    Keynote Speaker:
    Bernard Yack
    Lerman Neubauer Professor of Democracy and Public Policy
    Brandeis University

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

Past Events