Events @ C4E

  • Mon, Jan 15, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics, Understanding Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Joshua Knobe

    Norms and Normality

    People ordinarily distinguish between ways of behaving that are “normal” and those that are “abnormal.” But how exactly is this distinction to be understood? This talk will discuss a series of experimental studies designed to explore people’s ordinary notion of normality. The key result is that people’s ordinary notion of normality is not a purely statistical one (e.g., the type of behavior that is most frequent) or a purely prescriptive one (e.g., the type of behavior that is ideal) but rather one that mixes together statistical and prescriptive considerations. I discuss implications of these findings for ethics and for research in cognitive science.

    Joshua Knobe
    Yale University
    Program in Cognitive Science &
    Department of Philosophy

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Tue, Jan 16, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Timbuktu

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Jan 17, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Audrey Macklin
    Resettler Society: Private Refugee Sponsorship and Citizenship 

    How does the project of making refugees into citizens remake the citizenship of those who undertake it? That question animates an empirical research project focused on private refugee  sponsors. I will introduce the conceptual framework that structures the inquiry, and consider (provisionally) cosmopolitanism as motive for sponsorship, privatization as mode, and citizenship as effect.

    Audrey Macklin
    Director, Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies
    Professor of Law and Chair in Human Rights
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Jan 19, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Constantine Vassiliou, Montesquieu and Hume's English Affinities: The Nature of Honour and Its Function in Polite Commercial Society 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Jan 24, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Richard Moon

    Ktuxana Nation v. BC and the Shape of Religious Freedom 

    The main criticism of the recent Supreme Court of Canada decision in Ktuxana is that the court in its s. 2(a) (freedom of religion) analysis relies on a “Protestant” or “Christian” conception of religion – that focuses on personal belief rather than collective practice or shared ways of living. I will argue, however, that this criticism of the court’s approach to s. 2(a) fails to understand the practical limits of religious freedom in a spiritually and culturally diverse political community.

    Richard Moon
    Professor of Law
    University of Windsor

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Jan 30, 2018
    Science|Ethics|Tech, Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Frank Rudzicz, The Future of Automated Healthcare

    As artificial intelligence and software tools for medical diagnosis are increasingly used within the healthcare system generally, it will be important that these tools are used ethically. This talk will cover recent advances in machine learning in healthcare, current approaches to ethics in healthcare, likely changes to regulation to allow for increased use of AI, and new challenges, both technical and societal, that will arise given those changes.

    Frank Rudzicz
    University Health Network & Computer Science
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Jan 30, 2018
    Science|Ethics|Tech, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics of AI Film Series
    Ethics of AI Film Series: Blade Runner

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Fri, Feb 2, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Chi Kwok, Personal Autonomy and Workplace Justice 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Feb 5, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Jennifer Carlson

    The Police Man’s Burden: Emotional Labor, Masculinity and the Ethics of Force

    Use of force is central to police work, yet the contours of the use of force for American police have changed dramatically in recent years. First, police have become increasingly prepared to use force due to changes in training and equipment amid threats of mass shootings, domestic terrorism, and so forth. Second, police are increasingly policing contexts that are gun-rich and gun law-lax, with over 13 million people licensed to carry guns in the US. Third, police have increasingly faced public outcry related to the use of force, especially with regard to racial disparities in excessive force. In what contexts do police embrace, versus accept or even avoid, the use of force? Is police use of force equally ‘non-negotiable’ (see Bittner, 1973) across social settings? If not, why not—and to what ends? To explore these questions, this talk draws on interviews with nearly 80 police chiefs across Arizona, California, and Michigan. While policing scholarship has documented how “hard charger” masculinist approaches to policing mediates the central role of firearms in constituting “real” policework (see Herbert, 2001), I draw on the concept of ‘moral wages’ (see Kolb, 2014) to show how guns operate not just as means of violence but also as gendered tools of emotional management. Examining how police evaluate more versus less moralistic uses of force and at times even opt out of force, I show that police make ethical sense of the use of force by framing it as masculine carework. Further situating these findings within the divergent contexts of Arizona, California and Michigan (especially their respective gun cultures) reveals that the boundaries between police and broader society are more porous than often acknowledged: police sensibilities about legitimate force are patterned by more localized norms regarding the use of force as well as by the socio-legal regimes in which police are embedded.

    Jennifer Carlson
    University of Arizona
    School of Sociology & School of Government and Public Policy

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    200 Larkin

  • Tue, Feb 6, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Mireille Hildebrandt

    Mireille Hildebrandt
    Law and Technology, Vrije Universiteit Brussels
    Computing & Information Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 7, 2018
    Conferences
    Conference: Collective and Temporally Extended Rights and Wrongs

    Collective and Temporally Extended Rights and Wrongs

    Paradigmatic cases of moral obligations and wrongdoing involve a single act of an individual towards specific persons. However many cases of moral obligations and wrong do not have this structure. I can wrong a student by repeatedly failing to call on her in class, even if I am not obligated to call on her on any specific occasion. It seems also that we together can wrong others even though no individual act of any of us wrongs any specific other person. A similar structure presents itself in the theories of practical reason and collective rationality. Philosophers have examined the rational demands on behaviour that obtain in virtue of projects, plans, and commitments that extend through time. In the area of collective action, we may ask how my participation in a collective action contributes to the assessment of what is rational for me to do.

    Sergio Tenenbaum
    Professor of Philosophy
    University of Toronto
    09:00 AM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Feb 13, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Richard Zemel

    Richard Zemel
    Computer Science & Vector Institute
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Feb 13, 2018
    Science|Ethics|Tech, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics of AI Film Series
    Ethics of AI Film Series: Star Trek TNG

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 14, 2018
    Author Meets Critics
    Author Meets Critics: Mara Marin

    Connected by Commitment: Oppression and Our Responsibility to Undermine It (Oxford 2017)

    Mara Marin
    Postdoctoral Affiliate, Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    Commentators:
    Shannon Dea
    (Philosophy, University of Waterloo)
    Kerry Rittich (Law, University of Toronto)
    Meredith Schwartz (Philosophy, Ryerson University)
    Torrey Shanks (Political Science, University of Toronto)

    Saying that political and social oppression is a deeply unjust and widespread condition of life is not a terribly controversial statement. Likewise, theorists of justice frequently consider our obligation to not turn a blind eye to oppression. But what is our culpability in the endurance of oppression?

    In this book, Mara Marin complicates the primary ways in which we make sense of human and political relationships and our obligations within them. Rather than thinking of relationships in terms of our intentions, Marin thinks of them as open-ended and subject to ongoing commitments. Commitments create open-ended expectations and vulnerabilities on the part of others, and therefore also obligations. By this rationale, our actions sustain oppressive or productive structures in virtue of their cumulative effects, not the intentions of the actors.When we violate our obligations we oppress others.

    12:00 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Feb 16, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Cáit Power, The Jew in Speech: Conceiving the City, God, and Man 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Feb 26, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Kali Nicole Gross

    Kali Nicole Gross
    African American Studies
    Wesleyan University

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Feb 27, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: No No: A Dockumentary

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Feb 28, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: John-Stewart Gordon

    John-Stewart Gordon
    Professor & Head of the Research Cluster for Applied Ethics
    Vytautas Magnus University Kaunas

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Mar 2, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Thilo Schaefer, Laneways of the Imagination: The Importance of "Utopia" for City Building 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Mar 6, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Vincent Chiao

    Vincent Chiao
    Law
    University of Toronto

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Mar 7, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Simon Lambek

    Simon Lambek
    Doctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Mar 12, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics
    Perspectives on Ethics: Jessica Rosenfeld

    Jessica Rosenfeld
    Department of English
    Washington University in St. Louis

    co-sponsored by

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Mar 13, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: The Second Mother

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Mar 14, 2018

    Ethics@Noon: Jeremy Davis

    Jeremy Davis
    Doctoral Fellow, Centre for Ethics
    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Fri, Mar 16, 2018
    Political Theory Research Workshop
    Zhichao Tong, Epistemic Democracy and International Relations 03:00 PM - 04:30 PM
    Room 3130, Sidney Smith Building
    100 St. George St.

  • Tue, Mar 20, 2018
    Ethics of AI in Context
    Ethics of AI in Context: Kathryn Hume

    Kathryn Hume
    integrate.ai

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Mon, Mar 26, 2018
    Perspectives on Ethics, Events on Campus
    Shai Lavi

    Shai Lavi
    Director, Van Leer Jerusalem Institute

    hosted by:

    04:00 PM - 06:00 PM
    Room 100, Jackman Humanities Building
    170 St. George St.

  • Tue, Mar 27, 2018
    Science|Ethics|Tech, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!, Ethics of AI in Context, Ethics of AI Film Series
    Ethics of AI Film Series: Her

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Wed, Mar 28, 2018
    Ethics at Noon
    Ethics@Noon: Ryan Liss

    Crime at the Limits of Sovereignty

    Ryan Liss
    Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow
    Centre for Ethics

    University of Toronto

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Tue, Apr 10, 2018
    Ethics & the Arts, Ethics & Film: Lights, Camera, Ethics!
    Ethics & Film: Moonlight

    06:00 PM - 08:00 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

  • Thu, May 3, 2018

    Master Class: Rainer Forst

    Rainer Forst
    Professor of Political Theory & Philosophy
    Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M.

    co-sponsored by:

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Room 200, Larkin Building
    15 Devonshire Place

  • Fri, May 4, 2018
    Events on Campus
    Rainer Forst

    Rainer Forst
    Professor of Political Theory & Philosophy
    Goethe-Universität Frankfurt a.M.

    hosted by:

    12:30 PM - 02:00 PM
    Solarium, Faculty of Law
    84 Queen's Park, Falconer Hall

  • Fri, May 11, 2018
    Conferences
    Globalization and Its Critics in the 21st Century

    The 6th Annual
    University of Toronto
    Centre for Ethics

    Graduate Student Conference
    May 11-12, 2018

    Globalization and Its Critics in the 21st Century will take the opportunity to consider the ethical implications of the resurgence of anti-globalization movements, in an interdisciplinary setting. We will look at the categories and concepts that different disciplines have used to understand, defend, or critique globalization and its critics, and ask whether they remain adequate frameworks for thinking about contemporary developments (Call for Papers).

    Keynote Speaker:
    Bernard Yack
    Lerman Neubauer Professor of Democracy and Public Policy
    Brandeis University

    12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
    Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto
    Rm 200, Larkin Building

Past Events